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Nareed
Nareed
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March 3rd, 2012 at 9:38:11 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does carecer differ from faltar?



What the Argentinian said.

Quote:

Ella fue tan bonita que carecí el valor para le hablar. = She was so pretty I lacked the courage to talk to her.



"Ella ERA tan bonita que carecí Del valor para hablarLE."

If you use "fué" you mean she used to be pretty but no longer is. And "hablarle" is not the same as "le hablar." The latter, in fact, is gibberish.

Paco, I've never heard anyone ever use the word "faltarse."
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 3rd, 2012 at 9:46:04 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Paco, I've never heard anyone ever use the word "faltarse."



I don't mean that people use "faltarse". That is what they teach you in grammar classes if you are going to use:
me falto
te faltas
se falta
nos faltamos
se faltan

instead of:
yo falto
tu faltas
el falta
nosotros faltamos
ellos faltan

It is referred to as a "reflexive conjugation", or sometimes a "pronomial" use of the verb.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
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March 3rd, 2012 at 2:14:36 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

And "hablarle" is not the same as "le hablar." The latter, in fact, is gibberish.



Thanks. However, this comes as a surprise to me. I thought it was optional to put the direct object in front of the verb, or attach it to the end.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
aluisio
aluisio
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March 3rd, 2012 at 2:33:39 PM permalink
Carecer en sudamerica también tiene el significado de necesitar.
Como en "yo carezco de tu ayuda"
No bounce, no play.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 3rd, 2012 at 4:12:29 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks. However, this comes as a surprise to me. I thought it was optional to put the direct object in front of the verb, or attach it to the end.



Actually "le" is an indirect object pronoun, "lo" is a direct object pronoun, and the "rule" you are referring to is when you have two verbs (one conjugated, and the second as an infinitive).

Lo quiero ver.
Quiero verlo.

Pronoun review
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 3rd, 2012 at 5:08:49 PM permalink
Quote: aluisio

Carecer en sudamerica también tiene el significado de necesitar.
Como en "yo carezco de tu ayuda"



La frase "caracer de" significa "necesitar".

carecer: lack.
carecer de: be in need of, want (for), lack.
encarecer: recommend, exaggerate, raise the price.
encarecerse: go up in price, take a jump.
YoDiceRoll11
YoDiceRoll11
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March 3rd, 2012 at 7:31:14 PM permalink
So I asked the mom of the Argentinian, the old Argentinian, and she says that carecer is exactly used for a lack of character or some other trait and that faltar is for physical items (cosas).
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 3rd, 2012 at 8:24:48 PM permalink
Quote: YoDiceRoll11

So I asked the mom of the Argentinian, the old Argentinian, and she says that carecer is exactly used for a lack of character or some other trait and that faltar is for physical items (cosas).



People are not always 100% reliable about their own language. She may say that because traits are permanent, and she always uses that verb for "lack of some trait". I can find many example written in reliable sources where a trait is not even being discussed. In particular when used with "de" which often means it is not only lacking, but it is needed.

Dejaría de ser otro organismo vivo para transformarme en algo totalmente absurdo, por carecer de los requisitos imprescindibles para ser.
El laberinto, Augusto Casola

Durante más de una hora permanecieron con las turbinas en funcionamiento por carecer de equipo de puesta en marcha en tierra y con el alto riesgo de ser detectados por los británicos. (From Argentina) Prensa reporting on Falklands war.
YoDiceRoll11
YoDiceRoll11
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March 3rd, 2012 at 8:31:34 PM permalink
Of course paco. So just take it as, that's what most Argentinian's she knows (herself included) use it as. Kind of a connotation versus denotation type of thing. No worries.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 3rd, 2012 at 9:24:21 PM permalink
Quote: YoDiceRoll11

Of course paco. So just take it as, that's what most Argentinian's she knows (herself included) use it as. Kind of a connotation versus denotation type of thing. No worries.



I'm not sure what that you are saying.

If you ask an English speaker to define the verb with the conjugations have, has, had, having, most English speakers will say the verb means "to own" or " to possess".

But that definition will be confusing to a Spanish speaker, since there are at least 8 different meanings of the verb "have". It is one of the most common verbs in the English language, and it is used for a lot of situations

(1) He has a new car.
(2) He has finished
(3) Mary has her back to me.
(4) You donít have to accept this situation.
(5) I had a good time at the party.
(6) He had a look round.
(7) God have mercy on me!
(8) She had a letter from Mark.

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