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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 25th, 2012 at 9:38:26 AM permalink
Penny: I don't care if Richard Feinman was a purple leprechaun who looked at my butt.
Sheldon: Penny meant if he were a purple leprechaun. Penny forgot to use the subjunctive.


In English the use of the subjunctive looks like you are using plural past tense instead of singular (even though the subject is singular). Also the failure to use it (Penny) still produces a perfectly understandable sentence.

In Spanish you have a present subjunctive, and technically you have two past tense subjunctives. But one of them has atrophied to the point where it just sounds highbrow (i.e. "fuera" and it's highbrow version "fuese" for the verb "be"). Furthermore, in Spanish, unlike English, the subjunctive is not optional.
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 25th, 2012 at 10:56:25 AM permalink
Fecha: Feb 25, 2012
Palabra: Rayo


I think a previous SWD was relámpago = lightning. As I recall, the word rayo also came up. The search feature doesn't help us find where in this thread this came up, so forgive me for bringing up anything old. Anyway, as near as I can tell, relámpago refers to the flash of the lightning, and rayo refers to where it struck.

However, I think there are other usages for rayo, especially in idioms. It can also mean a beam or ray of light. What makes me bring it up is I'm having a hard time translating the qué rayos part of this sentence:

Y los chicos come Ronnie McCoy se rascan la cabeza, extrañados, preguntándose qué rayos ha sucedido.

I tend to think it is an expression of emphasis, like the English "damn." My best guess at the translation of the above would be.

And those boys like Ronnie McCoy scratch their head, surprised, asking themselves what the hell happened.

If I may push my luck, what specifically does extrañados mean. I'm having trouble with the "dos" part. It doesn't seem to be any conjugation of extrañar.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 25th, 2012 at 12:55:33 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

If I may push my luck, what specifically does extrañados mean. I'm having trouble with the "dos" part. It doesn't seem to be any conjugation of extrañar.



It's a participle, not a conjugation. You would use it with compound verbs like "We have surprised everyone in the room." The past participle can also be used as an adjective, as in this case.

expresar -( past participle) expresado
extrañar - ( past participle) extrañado


The idiom "qué rayos" does literally mean "which ray", but is translated as "what the hell".
My guess is that is similar to the English idiom "lightning never strikes in the same place twice".

---
English reminder.
Regular English verbs use the same ending for simple past, as they do for past participle.
We talked all night. We have talked until I was hoarse.
Irregular English verbs use a different ending.
I mowed the lawn. I have mown the lawn, many times before.

In Spanish the past participle is never the same as the simple past. But some verbs are irregular in that they don't end in "ando" or "iendo".
Nareed
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February 25th, 2012 at 1:04:18 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, I think there are other usages for rayo, especially in idioms.



Yes. But:

Quote:

It can also mean a beam or ray of light.



That's not an idiom.

Quote:

What makes me bring it up is I'm having a hard time translating the qué rayos part of this sentence:

Y los chicos come Ronnie McCoy se rascan la cabeza, extrañados, preguntándose qué rayos ha sucedido.



It's the Spanish way of saying "what the heck happened?" Which is a cleaned up, sort of, version of "¿que diablos ha pasado?" which naturally means "what eh hell happened?" if you want to dial it up, you say, at least in Mexico, "¿qué chingados pasó?" = "What the f*** happened?"

Quote:

If I may push my luck, what specifically does extrañados mean.



Bemused, bewildered, confused.

Quote:

I'm having trouble with the "dos" part. It doesn't seem to be any conjugation of extrañar.



Think of "extraño" meaning "strange."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 27th, 2012 at 5:03:15 PM permalink
Fecha: 27 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: maldecir


Today's SWD means to curse. A related word is maldición, which means a curse.

A question for the advanced reader is what is the difference between a maldición and a maleficio?

Ejemplo time.

No dices "siete" a la mesa de craps, o debes maldecir los dados. = Don't say "seven" at the craps table, or you'll curse the dice.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
aluisio
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February 27th, 2012 at 5:16:06 PM permalink
No dices "siete" a la mesa de craps, o vas a maldecir los dados.

Recordate que el verbo deber es como "must" en ingles!

I believe that a maldición is exactelly what a curse is, instead of maleficio that is something bad in a most general way, for example something ilicit or against the law. Even something that will cause harm to others...
No bounce, no play.
pacomartin
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February 27th, 2012 at 5:49:22 PM permalink


Maldicion de Malinche written by Gabino Palomares and sung by Amparo Ochoa Y Gabino Palomares is one of the most famous protest songs written in Latin America in the 1970's.

History Present Day
Del mar los vieron llegar  Se nos quedó el maleficio 
mis hermanos emplumados de brindar al extranjero
Eran los hombres barbados  Nuestra fe, nuestra cultura, 
de la profecía esperada nuestro pan, nuestro dinero.
Se oyó la voz del monarca  Y les seguimos cambiando 
de que el dios había llegado. oro por cuentas de vidrio
Y les abrimos la puerta  Y damos nuestras riquezas 
por temor a lo ignorado. por sus espejos con brillo.
Iban montados en bestias  Hoy, en pleno siglo veinte 
como demonios del mal nos siguen llegando rubios
Iban con fuego en las manos  Y les abrimos la casa 
y cubiertos de metal. y les llamamos amigos.
Sólo el valor de unos cuantos  Pero si llega cansado 
les opuso resistencia un indio de andar la sierra
Y al mirar correr la sangre  Lo humillamos y lo vemos 
se llenaron de verguenza. como extraño por su tierra.
Porque los dioses ni comen  Tu, hipócrita que te muestras 
ni gozan con lo robado humilde ante el extranjero
Y cuando nos dimos cuenta  Pero te vuelves soberbio 
ya todo estaba acabado. con tus hermanos del pueblo.
Y en ese error entregamos  Oh, maldición de Malinche, 
la grandeza del pasado enfermedad del presente
Y en ese error nos quedamos  ¿Cuándo dejarás mi tierra..?
trescientos años esclavos. ¿cuándo harás libre a mi gente?



Video with translations in Portuguese and English
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 28th, 2012 at 8:51:12 AM permalink
Nareed

Is the phrase: victoria pírrica common in Mexico?
Nareed
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February 28th, 2012 at 9:26:09 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Ejemplo time.

No dices "siete" a la mesa de craps, o debes maldecir los dados. = Don't say "seven" at the craps table, or you'll curse the dice.



I really ought to be working, but I just have to retranslate this one:

"You don't say "seven" to the craps table, or you must curse the dice."

I'll take on the rest later.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 28th, 2012 at 10:39:52 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

No dices "siete" a la mesa de craps, o debes maldecir los dados. = Don't say "seven" at the craps table, or you'll curse the dice.



I think you need imperative mood for the first verb, and future tense for the second verb.

No digas 7 cerca la mesa de craps, o maldeciré los dados.

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