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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 24th, 2012 at 1:51:10 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

We should seriously explore the possibility of a bilingual comedy routine :)



I'm glad you enjoy it. Most Spanish-speakers I torture up here with my Español horrible respond in English if they can.

Quote:

"Moza" is a rather archaic term and it means "girl." The male form, "mozo" means what you'd expect, but it also applies, sometimes, to male waiters and janitors.



Thanks. I probably saw mozo somewhere and assumed that moza meant waitress, which would make sense to me if I had anything to do with it.

Quote:

Do you tip more for a mixed drink than, say, a shot of whiskey?



Based on my 2/16 radio show, if it is a simple mixed drink like a Vodka & Tonic, then no. However, my wife always orders fancy effeminate drinks like piña coladas and strawberry daiquiris. Assuming they even agree to bring something that fancy, they usually make it out like it is a major bother, to obligate me to tip more.

Quote: Paco

mezcal=from Aztec (Nahuatl): metl (“maguey (agave)”) + ixcalli (“stew”).



Interesting. What other Aztec words are part of everyday Spanish now?

Trivia time! What aboriginal word was the first to be adopted into English?

Finally, I have another idiom: No faltaba más.

Also, I'm having trouble with the end of this sentence:

Si eras el que corría rápido de la clase, las tenía locas a todas.

Thanks for all your help, as always.
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Doc
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February 24th, 2012 at 6:12:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Trivia time! What aboriginal word was the first to be adopted into English?

Man, I have this vague recollection of a story about explorers asking the natives what they called the land/territory. The response was the native expression for "I don't understand you" or something like that, but that answer was taken as the English name for the land. I can't remember the word, but is that the aboriginal word you had in mind?

I wish I could remember such stories with all the details.
Nareed
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February 24th, 2012 at 7:05:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm glad you enjoy it. Most Spanish-speakers I torture up here with my Español horrible respond in English if they can.



That's far from enthusiastic agreement... Granted bilingual comedy is rare and has a limited market.

Quote:

Thanks. I probably saw mozo somewhere and assumed that moza meant waitress, which would make sense to me if I had anything to do with it.



Words are funny that way, and in other ways.

Quote:

Based on my 2/16 radio show, if it is a simple mixed drink like a Vodka & Tonic, then no. However, my wife always orders fancy effeminate drinks like piña coladas and strawberry daiquiris. Assuming they even agree to bring something that fancy, they usually make it out like it is a major bother, to obligate me to tip more.



You think Piña Colada is fancy? It's just cream of coconut, pineaple juice and rum, blended. I learned to make them at age six in Acapulco. A Martini is more complicated.

Quote:

Finally, I have another idiom: No faltaba más.



It can mean two things, depending on the tone of voice and attitude of the person saying it:

1) "By all means," or "Certainly I can acommodate your request," or "please go ahead," or a lot more. Basically it means you're graciously granting permission for something.

2) "Are you insane? Have you any idea what you're asking?" or maybe "have you lost what little was left of your mind, you insensitive prick!" In other words, you're being asked something outrageous and reacting angrily or sarcastically (or both). Remember one I used recently, "Y tu nieve de que sabor"? That's what it means.

Quote:

Also, I'm having trouble with the end of this sentence:

Si eras el que corría rápido de la clase, las tenía locas a todas.



You're not the only one. the first clause has no logical connection to the second. Literal translation: "If you were the one running quickly out of class, you drove the girls crazy." That sounds a lot like "If you wore the red sweater, the panda bear is pregnant."
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Nareed
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February 24th, 2012 at 7:11:07 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

Man, I have this vague recollection of a story about explorers asking the natives what they called the land/territory. The response was the native expression for "I don't understand you" or something like that, but that answer was taken as the English name for the land. I can't remember the word, but is that the aboriginal word you had in mind?



I've heard two versions of that as a joke. here's one:

A Mexican is sight-seeing in new York City. Whenever he comes upon an imposing skyscraper, he asks some passer-by "Oye, ¿quien cosntruyó este edificio?" Always the answer is "Excuse me?"

Later on he sees a big funeral procession. Curious he asks one of the mourners "¿Quien es el difunto?" The mourner repleis "Excuse me?" And the Mexican says "¡Lastima! ¡tan buen arquitecto que era!"

It's not a particualrly good joke, but the translation is left as an exercise to the class ;)
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Doc
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February 24th, 2012 at 10:36:13 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

..."Oye, ¿quien cosntruyó este edificio?" ...

... the translation is left as an exercise to the class ;)



Typos in a language I don't know can really trip me up.

The story I was referring to was not (supposedly) a joke but a genuine misunderstanding that resulted in the English adopting a completely inappropriate name for a land. It may have been in Australia, but I can't remember the details of the story.
pacomartin
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February 24th, 2012 at 11:14:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Interesting. What other Aztec words are part of everyday Spanish now?
Trivia time! What aboriginal word was the first to be adopted into English?



The most prominent Aztec (Nahuatl) words in English are chocolate, tomato, coyote, avocado, chiclets, shack and chile or chili. Also words that sound native like achiote, avocado, cocoa , guacamole, jicama, mesquite, mezcal, mole, ocelot, and tamale.

Aboriginal is sometimes used to refer to non-Indo European tribes that lives in Europe before the IE invasion. Germans are part of the IE people. The aboriginal people would include Finns and Estonians and other tribes who did not survive to the present day. They had been living in the rest of northern Europe for thousands of years before the Germanic invasion.

But I am guessing that by first aboriginal word you mean Algonquian languages. So I am assuming it is raccoon, moose, skunk, chipmunk, wampum. tomahawk, or moccasin.

Mexican Word Nahuatl Word English Translation
Aguacate Ahuacatl Avocado
Amate Amatl paper made from bark
Asquel āskā-tl A small ant
Atole Atolli prehispanic drink popular in Mexico and Central America
Azteca Asteka From Aztlan
Cacahuate Tlacucahuatl Peanut
Cacles Cactli Shoes / Sandals
Camote Camotli Sweet potato
Capulín Kapol-in Cherry
Chamaco Chamahuac Young Boy
Chante Chāntli Home
Chapopote Chapopotli Tar
Chapulin chapol-in Grasshopper
Chayote Chayotli A type of Mexican squash
Chicle Chictli Gum
Chile Chilli chilli pepper
Chipotle Chilpoctli Chipotle (same name) type of red chile
Chiquito tzitz quit Very small
Chipotle xipoctli A type of chile
Chocolate Chocolatl Chocolate (same name)
Copal Copalli Incense made from tree resins
Coyote Coyotl Coyote (same name)
Cuate Cuatl Twin or slang for buddy
Elote ēlō-tl Corn on the Cob
Escuincle Itzcuintli Small Child (also is a hairless prehispanic dog)
Guacamole Ahuaca-molli Guacamole (same name)
Guajolote wueh-xōlō-tl Turkey
Huacal Huacalli Cage made from sticks
Huarache kwarachi Sandal (actually a word from purepecha)
Hule Olli Rubber
Jicama Xicamatl crispy, sweet, edible root from Mexico
Jícara Xicalli cup or cup made from Jicaro tree
Jitomate Xictomatl Tomato Variety
Mecate Mecatl Rope
Mescal Mexcalli Mescal (same name)
Mezquite Mizquitl Mesquite (same name)
Molcajete Molcaxitl Kitchen Mortar
Malacate malacatl Winch
Mayate Mayatl Beetle
Mole Molli Mexican Sauce containing chiles, chocolate, peanutes and other ingredients used usually on chicken, pork or beef
Moyote Moyotl Flying Beetle or Horse Fly
Milpa Milpa Agricultural field
Mitote Mitotiqui Cause an Uproar, racket
Nopal Nopalli Nopal a cactus which is eaten
Ocelote Ocelotl Ocelot similar to a jaguar but smaller
Olote Olotl Corn Husk - espiga del maíz (sin los granos)
Papalote Papalotl Kite and Windmill
Petaca Petlacalli Suitcase
Petate Petatl Weaved mattress
Peyote Peyotl Peyote (same name)
Popote Popotl Drinking Straw
Pozole Potzolli Traditional pre-Columbian soup or stew
Pulque Poliuhqui means spoiled but is an alcoholic drink with the same name
Tamale Tamalli Tamale (same name)
Tecolote Tecolotl Owl
Tequila Tequila (same name)
Tianguis Tianquiztli Market
Tlacuache Tlacuatzin Opossum
Tlapalería Type of hardware store sells paints and tools
Tocayo Toca-yō-tl Namesake
Tomate Tomatl Tomato (same name)
Zacate Saka-tl Grass, Weeds
Zopilote Tzopilotl Vulture
Zapote Tzapotl A tropical tree and its fruit
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 24th, 2012 at 12:45:13 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A Mexican is sight-seeing in new York City. Whenever he comes upon an imposing skyscraper, he asks some passer-by
"Oye, ¿quien cosntruyó este edificio?" Always the answer is "Excuse me?"
Later on he sees a big funeral procession. Curious he asks one of the mourners "¿Quien es el difunto?" The mourner replies "Excuse me?" And the Mexican says "¡Lastima! ¡tan buen arquitecto que era!"
It's not a particualrly good joke, but the translation is left as an exercise to the class ;)



It sounds like a cleaned up version of a common story. I think every culture has a similar joke.

Quote: Ungua Joke

The newly elected Prime Minister is addressing a crowd in a small native village where English is not spoken by most of the inhabitants.
"We'll make sure you get new houses!" he proclaims.
"Ungua!" replies the crowd.
"And better roads!" he bellows.
"Ungua!" the crowd roars.
"Yes, we'll make sure you're better treated under my government than the previous PM" he solemnly announces.
"Ungua! Ungua!"
Pleased with the obvious excitement during his speech he steps off the stage and meets with a local guide and they go off to tour a ranch. As they enter the pasture, the chief says, "Be careful you don't step in the ungua, Mr. Prime Minister."

Nareed
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February 24th, 2012 at 1:01:13 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

Typos in a language I don't know can really trip me up.



And yet you can recognize typos in this language you don't know. Cute :)

Quote:

The story I was referring to was not (supposedly) a joke but a genuine misunderstanding that resulted in the English adopting a completely inappropriate name for a land. It may have been in Australia, but I can't remember the details of the story.



It may have happened. Or it may be one of those urban legends that give rise to jokes.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 25th, 2012 at 7:59:55 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Quote: Wizard

Can you expand on that? Where does the fuera come into play?


afuera == outside
fuera == imperfect subjunctive of verb "ser" (either first or third person)

If you look at a standard conjugation of "to be" in English, you tend to think of present and past (see table). But there is also the subjunctive mood in phrases such as "If I were you". The verb tense is not past tense, but rather a "speculative" statement. In English we use the past tense of the verb, but in Spanish (and all other Romance languages) they have special sets of endings.



Sheldon makes an observation about Penny failing to use of the subjunctive (while playing bongos) on this week's episode of "The Big Bang Theory" (about 16 minutes into the episode).
Wizard
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February 25th, 2012 at 8:57:34 AM permalink
One can't just forward to that spot in question, CBS forces you to watch the commercials at certain points. So, to save others the trouble, here is the dialogue Paco is referring to.

Penny: I don't care if Richard Feinman was a purple leprechaun who lived in my butt.

Sheldon: Penny meant if he were a purple leprechaun. Penny forgot to use the subjunctive.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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