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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 20th, 2012 at 8:06:02 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I hope Paco will find interest in the fact that one of your versions uses the preterit and one uses the imperfect.



(1) "Me largué porque el jefe vino de muy mal humor"
(2) "Me largué porque el jefe venía de muy mal humor"

Well the two sentences say slightly different things.
The first sentence implies that the boss came into the office in a bad mood, as an isolated event. (possibly a traffic altercation)
The second sentence implies that the boss has been in a bad mood since he came into the office this morning.

In English we tend to use an adverb to convey the distinction.


Quote: Wizard

May I ask why ser/estar was incorrect?



"Me fuí porque el jefe venía de muy mal humor."

As Nareed pointed out the past preterite tense of ir and ser is the same words, as well as the "imperfect subjunctive" (the 'fuera' conjugation).

The past versions of "to go" and "to be" are pretty similar in meaning in English as well.

He went to the store.
He was at the store.
Nareed
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February 20th, 2012 at 8:07:00 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

For example, if I said, "El rey fue feo." How would you know if the king was ugly or went to ugly (let's say there is a village named "feo")?



I would say "el rey era feo," or "el rey estaba feo."

You're right "fue" can be used as well. But it's not too common. In your earlier example, since people go to their offices, the assumption was that the boss went or arrived in a bad mood.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 20th, 2012 at 10:24:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

For example, if I said, "El rey fue feo." How would you know if the king was ugly or went to ugly (let's say there is a village named "feo")?




Quote: Rocketlanguages


Identical Twins: IR and SER
One of the strangest things to happen to Spanish verbs is to take on the exact same irregular preterite form, and this happens with the very common verbs ir and ser. Who knows why these two verbs evolved over the course of time to have the same preterite past tense form, but they do make life complicated if you’re unfamiliar with them.

Going or Being? The Problem with FUI
Now that you’ve memorized the verb forms for ir and ser, you may be wondering how in the world you will ever know whether a sentence with the word fui means “I went” or “I was.” Quite simply, by context! You’ll have to figure out which verb is meant by the rest of the words in the sentence. It’s not as hard as it sounds. See if you can guess the meaning of the verbs in the examples below:
1. Nosotros fuimos a la piscina la semana pasada.
2. Ayer fue un día muy aburrido.
3. Tú fuiste la persona que me robó.
Answers:
1. We went to the pool last week. ir
2. Yesterday was a very boring day. ser
3. You were the person who robbed me. ser




The sources of the accidents in the conjugation are different Latin verbs:
1) vadere "to advance"
2) ire "to go"
3) fui suppletive perfective of esse "to be". (The preterites of "to be" and "to go" are identical in Spanish and Portuguese.)

The same thing happened in English. The verb "to go" merged with the verb "to wend". The present tense "wend" is now archaic, but the past tense "went" is used as the past tense of "to go".

And, of course, three different verbs merged to form the "to be" conjugation: So now we have: am, are, is, was, were, be, and been as "accidents" of the same verb. The English construction "Have you been to France?" has no simple present form. In addition the archaic forms thou art (second-person singular present indicative), thou beest (second-person singular present indicative), thou wert / wast (second-person singular past indicative), he, she, it beeth (third-person singular present indicative).

Vernacular English preserves some of the older grammar associated with "to be".
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 20th, 2012 at 11:08:19 PM permalink
Thanks for the clarifications above. No further comment on ir and ser from me, let's move on.

Fecha: 21 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Aguantar


Today's SWD means to tolerate. I usually see it in the context of suffering other people.

A question for the advanced readers is how does aguantar differ from soportar y tolerar, neither of which I seem to see as often.

Ejemplo time.

Uno debe aguantar muchos imbéciles, si la libertad de expresión gratis esta ser preservada. = One must suffer a lot of morons if the freedom of free speech is to be preserved.

I'm sure I blew the ending, but I didn't know how to say "is to be" any better.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 21st, 2012 at 5:52:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does aguantar differ from soportar y tolerar, neither of which I seem to see as often.



Well they are certainly synonymous.
DRAE definition Aguantar: Soportar, tolerar a alguien o algo molesto o desagradable.

But aguantar (related to English word gauntlet) seems to be a much loftier word. One website defines the word as to endure one's fate bravely and with a certain style. The word is possibly of Italian origin.

I get the impression you might tolerate a bad smell, or endur (soportar) an annoying barfly. But to challenge the great battles in life are more appropriately described as throwing down the gauntlet.
Nareed
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February 21st, 2012 at 7:34:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does aguantar differ from soportar y tolerar, neither of which I seem to see as often.



As Paco hints, it also means "to endure." Be it morally, emotionally or physically. For example, if you're given a big weight to carry, you may be asked "¿lo vas a aguantar?"

Quote:

Uno debe aguantar muchos imbéciles, si la libertad de expresión gratis esta ser preservada. = One must suffer a lot of morons if the freedom of free speech is to be preserved.



Look up "fallas de origen" :) "Freedom of free speech" is a pleonasm. Then you made some mistaked. let's see:

"[..], si la libertad de libre expresión será preservada." And that's plaonasmic (is that a word?) as well. So:

[..] si la libre expresión será preservada."

Quote:

I'm sure I blew the ending, but I didn't know how to say "is to be" any better.



See above. But you made a more egregious error by using "gratis" to mean "free." The English "free" translates as two words in Spanish. 1) Gratis, meaning at no charge or no cost, and 2) Libre meaning without coercion or out of one's own will. So you in effect said "if freedom of no charge speech is to be preserved." :)

I wonder if we could make a bilingual comedy routine. I'd give you English sentences to translate, you'd mangle them and the audience would crack up :)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 21st, 2012 at 9:15:17 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed


Look up "fallas de origen" :) "Freedom of free speech" is a pleonasm. Then you made some mistaked. let's see:
"[..], si la libertad de libre expresión será preservada." And that's plaonasmic (is that a word?) as well. So:
[..] si la libre expresión será preservada."



I believe pleonastic (noun); pleonastic (adjective); and pleonastically (adverb); are all English words, but not pleonasmic. In any case the word is technical, and seldom used.

I have not seen the verb pair esta ser before, but it seems to be used in some blogs and posts.
The conjugation será is the future tense, which I would translate as "will be". I don't know if the following phrases work any better.
ha de ser == is to be
va a ser == will be

The phrase "fallas de origen" == "failures of origin" seems to be used in television broadcasts. It is customary in English to write sic (abbreviated from sic erat scriptum == "thus was it written" ) to indicate that the text is copied verbatim without any attempt to correct the grammatical errors.



Tu comentarios estaban cargados de sarcasmo.
buzzpaff
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February 21st, 2012 at 9:51:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Welcome to the SWD Buzz. Stick around a while. Try to speak some Español while you're here.

To abide by my own rules, here is a link to the famous winking Bettie Page (nudity warning).

That Spanish Bettie looks to be in the style of Little Annie Fannie.



I intend to get Roseeta Stone CD's or equivalent on CD's to listen to in car going to yards sales and hopefully a trip to Vegas later this year. I took 1 years of Spanish in High School but don't remember anything actually. Probably because the Xaverian Brothers placed more emphasis on the Latin class. Amo Amas Amat and Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres are burned into my brain. LOL


PS Thanks for the link. I never realized I was an art lover. A real bargain at only $2,000.
buzzpaff
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February 21st, 2012 at 9:54:16 AM permalink
Paco, care to translate what the photographer is saying ? PLEASE
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 21st, 2012 at 10:25:04 AM permalink


Quote: buzzpaff

Paco, care to translate what the photographer is saying ? PLEASE


¿Pero que significa esto? ¿Quienes son ustedes?
But what does this mean? Who are you?

From a memorium when she died.

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