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Nareed
Nareed
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February 19th, 2012 at 10:39:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for those translations. Seem to me the pretérito was used most of the time.



You're welcome.

Quote:

May I ask about the accent mark on the i? I hear the Academia Real has recently reversed itself, for the second time, on the accent marks on one-syllable verbs like fuí. They are now considered correct. How many points would I lose with you if I wrote fui without the accent mark? SpanishDict.com still leaves them off.



I pretty much put it on all verbs in the past tense out of habit. I'm not always right.

You don't lose any points. I often simply forget to use them.
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Wizard
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February 19th, 2012 at 10:50:59 AM permalink
Fecha: 19 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: asentir


Today's SWD means to agree. No to be confused with sentir, which means to feel, and that is not to be confused with sentar, which means to sit.

A question for the advanced readers is how does asentir differ from estar de acuerdo.

Ejemplo time.

Asentí a pasear el perro a menudo. = I agreed to walk the dog more often.
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pacomartin
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February 19th, 2012 at 11:18:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does asentir differ from estar de acuerdo.

Ejemplo time.

Asentí a pasear el perro a menudo. = I agreed to walk the dog more often.




Asentí means to agree, but also to "assent". I think in your example other synonymous verbs would be more commonly used. It sounds a little funny in English "I assented to walk.."

1) Estuve de acuerdo
2) Acepté
3) Accedí

I don't think the final phrase is complete "a menudo" means "often", but you want to say "more often":
1) más a menudo
2) con más frecuencia.
Nareed
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February 19th, 2012 at 1:39:23 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does asentir differ from estar de acuerdo.



Not much. It's a matter of usage. 99 out 100 people will say "estoy de acuerdo," or more often "no estoy de acuerdo," rather than use a form of "asentir." I dare say the person who uses "asentir" will use it wrong, too.

Quote:

Asentí a pasear el perro a menudo. = I agreed to walk the dog more often.



It looks ok to me. But I thought you were more of a cat person. Not that dogs and cats can't get along, depending on the cat (she migth enjoy having an animal for a pet as a novelty, I suppose). Usually cat people hate dogs and dog people hate cats.
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Wizard
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February 19th, 2012 at 10:00:27 PM permalink
Fecha: 20 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: largar


Today's SWD means to become scarce. There are some other meanings, but where I encountered it, larguense was a translation of "shoo shoo."

Ejemplo time

Me largué por que el jefe fuí en un mal humor. = I made myself scarce because the boss was in a bad mood.
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pacomartin
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February 19th, 2012 at 11:40:36 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

There are some other meanings, but where I encountered it, larguense was a translation of "shoo shoo."



I think it is normally somewhat stronger, like Get Out
Nareed
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February 20th, 2012 at 6:50:00 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 20 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: largar


Today's SWD means to become scarce.



I had no idea.

Quote:

There are some other meanings, but where I encountered it, larguense was a translation of "shoo shoo."



"Lárguense," or "lárgate" in the singular, means ""go away," or "get lost." The implication of the word is either anger, impatience or disgust.

Quote:

Me largué por que el jefe fuí en un mal humor. = I made myself scarce because the boss was in a bad mood.



Well, to begin with you sued the wrong pronoun in "fuí" which is in first person. So you're saying "I went away becasue the boss I went in a bad mood." Second, few people would apply the word "largué" to themselves. If someone rudely or angrily tells you to get lost you may chose to leave, but you wouldn't describe your action as "I got lost." You'd say "I left."

So: "Me largué porque el jefe vino de muy mal humor," or "Me largué porque el jefe venía de muy mal humor."

Better yet: "Me fuí porque el jefe venía de muy mal humor."
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Wizard
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February 20th, 2012 at 7:33:06 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

So: "Me largué porque el jefe vino de muy mal humor," or "Me largué porque el jefe venía de muy mal humor."

Better yet: "Me fuí porque el jefe venía de muy mal humor."



Thanks. Yes, the first person conjugation of ser was a stupid mistake, and one I seem to make often.

I see you're using venir (to come) for the boss. Did you assume the boss showed up to work in a bad mood, or is it an idiomatic thing that a bad mood comes upon a person?

May I ask why ser/estar was incorrect?

I hope Paco will find interest in the fact that one of your versions uses the preterit and one uses the imperfect.
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Nareed
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February 20th, 2012 at 7:37:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I see you're using venir (to come) for the boss. Did you assume the boss showed up to work in a bad mood, or is it an idiomatic thing that a bad mood comes upon a person?

May I ask why ser/estar was incorrect?



You were using "ir" not "estar." For that you'd need to have said "...el jefe estaba de mal humor."
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Wizard
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February 20th, 2012 at 8:03:30 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You were using "ir" not "estar." For that you'd need to have said "...el jefe estaba de mal humor."



I meant to use ser. The past tense conjugation of ser is the same as ir. I could imagine there might be situations where the speakers intent was not made clear due to this. For example, if I said, "El rey fue feo." How would you know if the king was ugly or went to ugly (let's say there is a village named "feo")?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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