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Nareed
Nareed
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February 13th, 2012 at 4:58:46 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Well, this is what a sink looks like in Britain, which is virtually unheard of in America.



Not all sinks I saw in Egnland were like that, though some were. I've also seen them in other places, notably at a fancy hotel in Guanajuato way back in the 70s.

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A standard American sink is what they call a mixed tap.



In Mexico, too. Decorated sinks, liek that in your photo, are more lilkley to be found at Mexican restaurants and hotles in "colonial" cities like Guanajuato or Queretaro, and then only the more traditional one like "Real De Minas."

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Of course in Japan a faucet is more likely to have a digital temperature readout, so that you don't actually splash your face with cold water, or burn your hands.



I wouldn't mind that, but ti seems like an unnecessary expense. With the single handle faucets that are all the rage these days, you can see how far to the left (hot) the handle is anyway.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 14th, 2012 at 7:29:29 PM permalink
Fecha: 14 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: Joyas


In honor of Valentine's Day today's SWD means jewelry. As part of the commercialization of the holiday, requisite gifts have grown from chocolate in heart-shaped boxes and greeting cards to diamonds and other jewelry. I say it is all a conspiracy, but what can one voice accomplish?

A questions for the advanced readers is how does joyas differ from alhajas?

Yet another question is what do the Georgetown Hoyas refer to? I know that is spelled with an H, but isn't the pronunciation the same?

Ejemplo time.

Para el día de San Valentín tenía un amarillo diamante pequeño por mi esposa. Sin embargo, ella no le gustaba. = For Valentine's Day I got a small yellow diamond for my wife. However, she didn't like it.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 14th, 2012 at 8:07:07 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A questions for the advanced readers is how does joyas differ from alhajas?



They mean the same thing. At a guess one is derived from Latin and the other from Arabic. Other than that, nothing.

Quote:

Para el día de San Valentín tenía un amarillo diamante pequeño. Sin embargo, mi esposa no le gustaba. = For Valentine's Day I got a small yellow diamond for my wife. However, she didn't like it.



You actually said "For Valentine's day I had a yellow small diamond." And you didn't add "para mi esposa" tot he original sentence.

Now the obligatory "when I was learning English" portion of the post. When I was learning English I had a hard time with the word "got." It seemed redundant, for example, in the Beatles' song "For I have got another girl."

Anyway, "tener" means "to have," not "to get." The latter translates as "conseguir."

So, "Para el día de San Valentin le conseguí a mi esposa un pequeño diamante amarillo."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 14th, 2012 at 8:18:27 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Now the obligatory "when I was learning English" portion of the post. When I was learning English I had a hard time with the word "got." It seemed redundant, for example, in the Beatles' song "For I have got another girl."



I admit people sometimes talk like that, but I don't think "For I have got another girl" is correct English. As you said, the "got" is redundant. As I kid, my mother was always correcting me for saying "got" too much, and I think it is a frequently incorrectly used word in the language.

It seems kids are also always getting correcting for saying "me" instead of "I." When these kids grow up they still maintain a fear of using the word "me," even when it is correct, lest their old mothers still scold them.

Quote: Nareed

Anyway, "tener" means "to have," not "to get." The latter translates as "conseguir."



Yeah, I deserve some push ups for that error. For what it is worth I added a por mi esposa before you responded. As usual, I wasn't sure whether to use para or por.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 14th, 2012 at 8:45:17 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

They mean the same thing. At a guess one is derived from Latin and the other from Arabic. Other than that, nothing.

Now the obligatory "when I was learning English" portion of the post. When I was learning English I had a hard time with the word "got." It seemed redundant, for example, in the Beatles' song "For I have got another girl."



Yes, almost every word that starts with the letters "al" is from Arabic since al means "the" in Arabic. Including (surprisingly) "alcohol"( in arabic al-kuhul) which originally meant a cosmetic powder.

---------------

The English word "have" is used in two radically different ways. In one sense it means "tener", and in another sense it means "haber". There is also a difference in the past participle of "to get". In American English we generally say "gotten", while in British English they say "got".

So in American English it is proper to say "I have gotten drunk for the last time", while in British English you say "I have got drunk for the last time". So the phrase "I have gotten another girl" would be proper American English.

So I have got another girl is proper British English, but it naturally sounds redundant to a Spanish speaker. From the grammar of the sentence, the verb "have" is being used like a conjugation of haber. In Spanish it would be Yo he tenido un otra chica.
Wizard
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February 14th, 2012 at 8:52:50 PM permalink
I suppose "I have got another girl" would be different from "I have another girl," because the former emphasizes the capturing of the girl. It seems to imply the action is more important than the girl, like he just wanted any girl, probably to forget about a previous one.

I retract my objection to it, but it still isn't how I would say it.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 14th, 2012 at 9:01:18 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

it still isn't how I would say it.



In American English you would say "I got another girl" (simple past), or "I have gotten another girl" (present perfect).
Clearly the Beatles were also looking for a good word for the downbeat of the song.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 14th, 2012 at 9:14:55 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In Spanish it would be Yo he tenido un otra chica.



Actually that doesn't even make sense.

"He conseguido otra chica." That's the exact translation of "I have got another girl."
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Wizard
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February 14th, 2012 at 9:45:53 PM permalink
If I may change the topic, how would you translate this sentence, "No decían que andaban mal de dinero?"

And another, "Vamos a tirar la casa por la ventana."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
mrjjj
mrjjj
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February 14th, 2012 at 9:49:25 PM permalink
It would be kind of nice if the (ummm) Spanish speaking people here in the U.S., had an English word of the day....just sayin.

Ken

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