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Wizard
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Wizard 
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February 11th, 2012 at 2:32:20 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Desde que me mudé aquí, me parece que he tenido muchAs llantas pOnchadas."



I can see now that ponchada means punctured, but according to SpanishDict.com, pinchada is the past participle of pinchar, which means to puncture. I respectfully ask for a reconsideration of that correction.
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Nareed
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February 11th, 2012 at 3:45:42 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I can see now that ponchada means punctured, but according to SpanishDict.com, pinchada is the past participle of pinchar, which means to puncture. I respectfully ask for a reconsideration of that correction.



Sorry. You are right in the meaning, but it's just not used that way. It also sounds a bit like "pinche," which is a swear word here. And it's too close tot he right usage, "ponchada," that it sounds wrong even if it's not.

BTW there's no Spanish term for "flat tire." You can say "ponchada." If it's missing air but not flat, you say "está baja la llanta."
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pacomartin
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February 11th, 2012 at 4:31:33 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Sorry. You are right in the meaning, but it's just not used that way. It also sounds a bit like "pinche," which is a swear word here. And it's too close tot he right usage, "ponchada," that it sounds wrong even if it's not.



The DRAE gives as an example sentence: Sufrir un pinchazo una rueda . Do you think that sentence would be more likely said in Spain?
Wizard
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February 11th, 2012 at 4:44:08 PM permalink
Here is a passage from "Olivia la Princesa."

Resulta que al carro de la familia de Olivia se la había pincado un neumático, que fue por lo que no pudieron llegar a la fiesta.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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February 11th, 2012 at 4:58:57 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The DRAE gives as an example sentence: Sufrir un pinchazo una rueda . Do you think that sentence would be more likely said in Spain?




Leave it to Spaniards to mangle out language beyond recognition (yes, this joke is getting old...)

Consider the meaning: to suffer a puncture in a wheel.

Wheel does not mean tire. But leaving that aside, the tire suffers the puncture, not the person who drives or owns the car. See?
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Nareed
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February 11th, 2012 at 5:07:14 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Resulta que al carro de la familia de Olivia se la había pincado un neumático, que fue por lo que no pudieron llegar a la fiesta.



No doubt. It's not wrong, just not used that way.

I think many, if not most, Spanish translations are wither done by Spaniards or by people imitating Spaniard style. Back in high school we used to make fun of the language contained in books we were assigned. Let me tell you, few things will spoil a dramatic, sad scene in "All's Quiet on the Western Front" better than inappropriate language exactly in the right place.
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Wizard
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February 12th, 2012 at 2:24:33 PM permalink
Here is what my tutor said about the "flat tire."

Quote: Maestra de Español del Mago

I would say the most educated way to say is: "una llanta pinchada." In Mexico you might hear a different
adjective, in Argentina, for example we would say: una rueda pinchada.

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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February 12th, 2012 at 3:53:28 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is what my tutor said about the "flat tire."



The population of Mexico is over 110 million. That of Argentina around 40 million. Word usage is a matter of numbers. But leaving that side, "rueda" means "wheel," not "tire."
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pacomartin
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February 12th, 2012 at 7:01:43 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is what my tutor said about the "flat tire."



A red se ha hecho eco de toda esta vorágine hasta el punto en el que se han creado espacios virtuales para dejar fuera de juego a Lewis Hamilton. Es el caso de una página web en la que bajo el título Pincha La Rueda de Hamilton, en la que uno puede elegir el objeto con el que pinchar la rueda del piloto británico en el circuito de Brasil, donde este domingo se decide el Mundial.
Wizard
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February 12th, 2012 at 8:31:09 PM permalink
Fecha: 13 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: Grifo


Today's SWD means faucet.

A question for the advanced readers is what is the difference between a grifo and a canilla?

When I hear grifo what comes to my mind is a boligrafo (pen). Does this imply a pen is like a faucet of ink? They often become one when I put one in my pocket. Funny how they never just start leaking just laying around doing nothing at home. What is a boli anyway? The word for ink is tinta. Can I also call a pen a tintagrifo? Sorry to get so off topic.

Ejemplo time

Esto grifo goteando me está volviendo loco. = That dripping faucet is driving me crazy.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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