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Nareed
Nareed
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February 9th, 2012 at 8:35:58 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 9 de Febrero, 2012
Palabar: Acceder


Today's SWD means to agree.



Yeah, that didn't seem right. Actually it means "to consent" and "to enter or to go in."

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is how does it differ from acordar, which I seem to see/hear much more frequently.



See above. "Acordar" does mean "to agree," or "to reach an agreement."

Quote:

It seems to me that acceder is for the situation of agreeing to a request.



Yes, see above: to consent.

Quote:

Debido al accidente del carro, accedé a cancelar la apuesta. = Due to the car accident, I would agree to call off the bet.



I have to attempt a literal re-translation. it's funny:

"Due to the car having an accident, he consented to cancel the bet."

There's no exact match for "car accident" in Spanish. "Accidente del carro" implies the car had an accident, which would be true but not relevant to cancelling the bet with Hot Blonde. A better expression would be "traffic accident." In Spanish that comes to "accidente de transito," or "accidente vial." In this particular case, though, you can say the accident involved a car. So:

"Debido al accidente que tuvo con el carro, accedí a cancelar al a apuesta." "Due to the accident she had with a car, I consented to cancel the bet."
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YoDiceRoll11
YoDiceRoll11
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February 10th, 2012 at 12:01:15 AM permalink
Quote: YoDiceRoll11

Quote: Wizard

Yes, you can always say mil milliones, but doesn't it get redundant? With the enormous inflation Argentina has been known to go through, a billion pesos might have been quite achievable.



Hmmm, I'll have to ask the girl when we both get back from work. Yeah I don't think there is a word for billion. The Argentinian inflation stories are crazy, banks stealing money, etc, I've heard some of the stories about the early 2000's, and the 90's. Yikes.



OK guys, I asked the Argentinian and She says without a doubt the word for billion in Spanish is billon/billones. She says they use it in Argentina and South American countries. Wasn't sure about Spain or Mexico but said she thought it was the same there.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 10th, 2012 at 7:40:38 AM permalink
Quote: YoDiceRoll11

OK guys, I asked the Argentinian and She says without a doubt the word for billion in Spanish is billon/billones. She says they use it in Argentina and South American countries. Wasn't sure about Spain or Mexico but said she thought it was the same there.



In Mexico it's used to mean "one million million," or what in English is called a "trillion."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 10th, 2012 at 7:49:03 AM permalink
Fecha: 10 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: asombrosa


Today's SWD means wonderful, astonishing,or marvelous.

A question for the advanced readers is whether there is an etymology connection to the word sombra, which means shade.

Ejemplo time.

Tuve una semana asombrosa in el Cañón Grande. = I had a wonderful week in the Grand Canyon.
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Nareed
Nareed
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February 10th, 2012 at 7:58:08 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means wonderful, astonishing,or marvelous.



I'd have gone with "amazing." "Marvelous" is definetly "maravillosa/o"

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is whether there is an etymology connection to the word sombra, which means shade.



I don't know. Useless, but honest :)

Quote:

Tuve una semana asombrosa in el Cañón Grande. = I had a wonderful week in the Grand Canyon.



That's good, except "in" isn't a Spanish word. You meant to say "en." Also the Grand Canyon is translated as "El Grán Cañón." Sometimes it's referred to as "El Grán Cañón del Colorado." I find the latter superfluous, as there is not other Grand Canyon as far as I know.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 10th, 2012 at 3:46:18 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is whether there is an etymology connection to the word sombra, which means shade.



They are related, as they both comes from Latin subumbrare. The relationship is that of a shadow and a ghost.

A minor definition of sombra from the DRAE
sombra Espectro o aparición vaga y fantástica de la imagen de una persona ausente o difunta
asombroso Que causa asombro

Even in English umbra used to mean "phantom" or "ghost"

Poetically equating shade with dreams and the supernatural is an old correlation in English. From 400 years ago:

HAMLET: O God, I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.
GUILDENSTERN: Which dreams indeed are ambition, for the very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.
HAMLET: A dream itself is but a shadow.

Wizard
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Wizard
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February 11th, 2012 at 7:31:02 AM permalink
Fecha: 11 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: llanta


Today's SWD means tire. It is a frequently seen word in Vegas. Lots of small auto repair shops in Spanish-speaking parts of Vegas have big signs that say llantas. Meanwhile, you rarely see stores with big signs that say "tires."

A question for the advanced readers is how does a llanta differ from neumático?

Ejemplo time

Desde que vine aquí me parece que tener muchos llantas pinchadas. = Since I moved here I seem to get lots of flat tires.

This is true, by the way. It seems I'm always running over screws and nails, resulting in slow leaks.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 11th, 2012 at 7:51:57 AM permalink


The Spanish word "llanta" is derived from Latin "planta" which is used in English in medical terminology for the sole of your foot. The word also means "plant" as both the green kind, and the verb where you "plant your foot".

In Spain "llanta" refers to the wheel or the tire rim. In Latin America it has displaced the more correct word for tire, "neumático" which is obviously the same word as "pneumatic".

It's actually the English word tire which is the one with the complex etymology. From the late 1400's the word is a short version of attire which implies that the tire is the dressing of the wheel. The original spelling was tyre, which had shifted to tire in 17c.-18c., but since early 19c. tyre has been revived in Great Britain and become standard there.

pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 11th, 2012 at 10:28:40 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Desde que vine aquí me parece que tener muchos llantas pinchadas.



The DRAE gives as an example sentence: Sufrir un pinchazo una rueda or literally "To suffer a puncture of a wheel".
That may be the way you refer to a flat tire in Spain. Nareed will have to answer.


Rayo McQueen en el momento de sufrir el pinchazo de su rueda durante la carrera de la Copa Pistón.

"Copa Pistón" or "Piston Cup" is a championship race in the Cars Disney PIXAR movie.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 11th, 2012 at 10:47:01 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means tire. It is a frequently seen word in Vegas. Lots of small auto repair shops in Spanish-speaking parts of Vegas have big signs that say llantas. Meanwhile, you rarely see stores with big signs that say "tires."



That's odd. The shops that say "llantas" in Mexico are those that sell and install tires. The ones that service and fix tires are little hole-in-the-wall types of places, and their signs say "vulcanizadora." Oh, the big tire places will fix tires, too. But they charge a lot more. You don't fix a puncture there, unless it's covered by warranty.

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is how does a llanta differ from neumático?



I think they're synonyms. But in Mexico you won't hear many people say "neumático."

On the other hand, the metal wheel the tire is mounted on is called "rin" in Mexico, plural "rines."

Quote:

Desde que vine aquí me parece que tener muchos llantas pinchadas. = Since I moved here I seem to get lots of flat tires.



"Desde que me mudé aquí, me parece que he tenido muchAs llantas pOnchadas."
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