Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 25th, 2012 at 7:57:47 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I thought they'd fixed their funny money, like Brazil and others did.

In Mexico you can get a bank loan to buy a home, or credit with the home as colalteral. It's called "Hipoteca" or "Credito Hipotecario." I think you can get it for up to 20 years to pay back.



Argentina replaced the currency in 1970 at 100:1, in 1983 at 10,000:1 , in 1985 at 1,000:1 and in 1992 at 10,000:1. Then they fixed it to a dollar for 9 years, until the pressure became too intense. It's very different than Mexico who replaced the peso one time at 1,000:1 .

Inflation in Argentina in 2010 was 22% which means prices double in a little more than 3 years.

Connie Mack III made a proposal in 2000 that the US government extend an offer to governments in the Western Hemisphere that we will purchase all their currency in US paper currency. The idea was that the local government simply operates with the dollar as their currency. In addition the US government will make periodic payments to the local government to make up for their loss in seignorage. The advantage to the USA is more stability in the hemisphere, a better trading partner, and less pressure on illegal immigration (not a big factor for Argentina).

The bill was killed in committee and never put before a senate vote. The grounds were that the proposal had only fuzzy benefits to the USA.

El Salvador was anxiously awaiting the outcome of this proposed bill. When it was killed, they proceeded with the plan to dollarize the country anyway (but it cost the president the election).
---------------------------
The English word mortgage is from Latin "mort" for death, and "gage" which used the obsolete meaning of "to pledge". Originally, it was an 'interest only' payment for normally 5 to 7 years on a relatively small percentage of the equity (usually 50%). At the end of that time, you secured another mortgage or you paid off the interest completely. It was called a "dead pledge" because death came in terms of either a payoff, or foreclosure on the property. The idea of paying off the principal over a given number of years, and requiring a small down payment came about in the depression as home ownership was seen as crucial to economic recovery.

The Spanish word hipoteca is based on the original Latin word hypotheca which was a secured loan. The Mexican loans for 20 years are relatively recent. After the peso collapse in 1993 you could only get 5 to 7 year mortgages.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23441
January 25th, 2012 at 7:59:23 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It's called "Hipoteca" or "Credito Hipotecario." I think you can get it for up to 20 years to pay back.



Let's make that the SWD.

Fecha: 26 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Hipoteca


As Nareed mentioned, hipoteca means mortgage. This was mentioned before, but the word for racetrack is hipodromo. Let's look at some other words that start with hipo:

hipodermica = hyperdermic
hipocrita=hypocritical
hipofosfito=Hypophosphite
hipótesis=Hypothesis
hipotenusa=hypotenuse

If I'm not mistaken, the root "hipo" means under. A question for the advanced readers is a mortgage is under what? In Vegas most of them could mean "underwater."

Ejemplo time

¿Qué índice de interés estás pagando en tu hipoteca? = What interest rate are you paying on your mortage?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 25th, 2012 at 8:20:07 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Let's make that the SWD.

Fecha: 26 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Hipoteca


As Nareed mentioned, hipoteca means mortgage. This was mentioned before, but the word for racetrack is hipodromo. Let's look at some other words that start with hipo:

hipodermica = hyperdermic
hipocrita=hypocritical
hipofosfito=Hypophosphite
hipótesis=Hypothesis
hipotenusa=hypotenuse

If I'm not mistaken, the root "hipo" means under. A question for the advanced readers is a mortgage is under what? In Vegas most of them could mean "underwater."

Ejemplo time

¿Qué índice de interés estás pagando en tu hipoteca? = What interest rate are you paying on your mortage?



hipo (in English hypo) does mean "under". You have to be careful in your example since you gave an example with "hyper" which means "over" or "super". The correct word is hypodermic which means "under the skin".

Hypothecate does exist in English as well, but it is usually a technical legal term.

The word "hypothesis" is more common, it literally means a theory (or thesis) that is "put under".

The idea of going "under" is not related to being "under debt". It would be more common today to think of putting a hypothesis "on the table" or to "run it up the flagpole". I think there is an older concept of the thesis as being "under". It is easier with some medical terms like "hypoglycemic" which is "under the normal amount of sugar".
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
January 25th, 2012 at 9:54:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

As Nareed mentioned, hipoteca means mortgage. This was mentioned before, but the word for racetrack is hipodromo. Let's look at some other words that start with hipo:



I suppose there are two original Latin prefixes involving "hipo." One means under, one means horse.

Quote:

¿Qué índice de interés estás pagando en tu hipoteca? = What interest rate are you paying on your mortage?



By usage you should ask "¿Qué TASA de interés....?

"Tasa" means rate, more or less, usually applied to percentages.
"Taza" means cup.
"Tazza" is an overpriced brand of coffee.

It can get confusing.

In any case, I don't know why the "hipo" in 2hipoteca." More confusing, the suffix "teca" reffers to a palce where certain objets are kept or collected. For example, Library is Biblioteca, A newspaper archive (of actual newspaper copies) is known as "hemeroteca." But other words differ, too, like "Discoteca," which isn't a place where audio records are kept or collected.

Want more confussion? There's an upscale neighborhood in the suburbs called "Tecamachalco" (I used to live just next to it). It's commonly simply called "Teca"

There you ahve it: Latin, Spanish, English and some kind of Mexica language all conspiring to render suffixes meaningless :P
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 26th, 2012 at 8:21:29 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

In any case, I don't know why the "hipo" in "hipoteca." More confusing, the suffix "teca" reffers to a palce where certain objets are kept or collected. For example, Library is Biblioteca, A newspaper archive (of actual newspaper copies) is known as "hemeroteca."



El término hipoteca es una expresión compuesta, que procede de la lengua griega clásica, derivada de las palabras hypo (debajo) y teka (cajón, caja); es decir, que la hypo-teka era para los griegos algo que estaba oculto, aquello que permanecía escondido debajo del cajón, puesto que no existen signos externos de su existencia, al no conllevar la exigencia de la posesión en favor del acreedor hipotecario para ser constituida.

That's an etymology you would never guess in a million years.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
January 26th, 2012 at 8:24:14 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

That's an etymology you would never guess in a million years.



A million years is a long time :)

Look up "hipocampo."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 26th, 2012 at 9:08:29 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A million years is a long time :)

Look up "hipocampo."



If you unaware of the Greek alphabet, π= pi or the 'p' sound and μ = mu or the 'm' sound.

The word is from Greek (ἵ π π ο ς) hippo or horse, and ( κ ά μ π ο ς ) kampus or sea monster combined to get "sea horse".

The word in Greek is ( ὑ π ό ) or hypo or under. It is unrelated to the word (ἵ π π ο ς) or hippo.

I don't know what happened to the extra 'p' in the Spanish word hipocampo. It got lost somewhere. As we discussed earlier, this happened in English spelling as well. The words 'receipt', 'conceit', and 'deceit' are basically built on the same root word, but only one of them has the letter 'p'.

===============
In English the meaning of the prefix hypo- is clear in dozens of technical or medical words like: Hypostasis (underlying reality), Hypodermic (under skin), and Hypoxic (under oxygenated) but it is less obvious in the more common words.

Hypotenuse (the side under the right angle)
Hypothesize (the underlying thesis or argument)
Hypocrite (under the critical thought) which now means someone whose actions subvert their words.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23441
January 27th, 2012 at 10:12:06 PM permalink
Fecha: 28 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Lloriquear


Today's SWD means to whine/snivel. A related word is llorar, which means to cry.

A question for the advanced readers is how does "quear" suffix in general change a word? In this case it would seem to make it less forceful, or perhaps faked.

Ejemplo time.

lloriqueé porque tuve ir a cama mas temprano. = I whined because I had to go to bed early.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 28th, 2012 at 4:16:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does "quear" suffix in general change a word? In this case it would seem to make it less forceful, or perhaps faked.



I don't think it is a suffix so much as a choice for orthography (see examples).


blanco= the color of snow or milk (from German word blank)
blanquear = to turn white

llorica=person who cries frequently or without reason
lloriquear = to whimper

To go from a noun to an infinitive form of the verb, the c is replaced with 'que'.

Orthography basically means spelling, but it is more how the decisions are made for proper spelling. For example is the city Peking or Beijing, and is the city Philadelphia or Filadelfia. In Spanish sometimes we say a verb is irregular, but it is really just an orthographic decision. We say "traducir" for "to work". To say "I work" we insert a letter 'z' as in "traduzco". The verb is not classically irregular, but there is an spelling irregularity to aid in pronounciation. Another example is the "silent h" in Spanish.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23441
January 29th, 2012 at 5:55:22 PM permalink
Fecha: 29 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: enfadar


Today's SWD means to get angry.

A question for the advanced readers is the difference between enfadar and enojar, which also means to get angry. I apologize if we already went over this when we paid tribute to the Skipper in the Gilligan's Island series.

Ejemplo time

Estoy enfado porque el avión esta lleno y no puedo sentir en mi silla. = I'm angry because the airline overbooked and refused me my seat.

I know it is a terrible translation, but I didn't know how else to say it. Consider it my tribute to Hawaiian Airlines.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: