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Nareed
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January 15th, 2012 at 8:43:39 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That seems to be one definition, but I don't concede that I'm wrong either.



Maybe in South America or Spain. In Mexico you're wrong.

But then them foreigners use our language funny. For example, a "torta" is a sandwich made with a kind of roll. In other countries it means "cake." I think I've mentioned this before.

Point is if you are in Mexico and ask for buñuelos at, say, Krispy Kreme, they'll tell you they don't have any.
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Wizard
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January 15th, 2012 at 9:43:00 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

For example, a "torta" is a sandwich made with a kind of roll. In other countries it means "cake." I think I've mentioned this before.



Here too. However, I tend to think they use two slices of bread, put whatever between them, and then cook it.

Quote:

Point is if you are in Mexico and ask for buñuelos at, say, Krispy Kreme, they'll tell you they don't have any.



I'll whip out my dictionary and correct them.
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Nareed
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January 15th, 2012 at 10:24:29 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here too. However, I tend to think they use two slices of bread, put whatever between them, and then cook it.



A torta uses a kind of roll called bolillo or telera. It can have a hard or soft crust. Ideally they're made warm on a griddle. Some places make them cold.
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YoDiceRoll11
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January 15th, 2012 at 10:15:33 PM permalink
So of course, I had to ask the Argentinian (my fiance).

She overheard me say bunuelo, and mentioned you guys should check out masitas dulces.....

She says they look like this in the stores.


And these are her two favorites:

Alfajores con dulce de leche y coco (coconut)

Dulce de leche masitas dulces con cereza
pacomartin
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January 15th, 2012 at 11:49:37 PM permalink
Quote: YoDiceRoll11

She overheard me say bunuelo, and mentioned you guys should check out masitas dulces.....



They look wonderful. But masitas are pastries , and dulces masitas are "sweet pastries". A buñuelo involves fried dough (in whatever shape) which can be sweetened with powdered sugar. I don't think your fiancee was saying "masitas" and " buñuelo" are interchangeable words.


A Mexican torta served with cebollas or delicous grilled onions.
YoDiceRoll11
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January 15th, 2012 at 11:54:25 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I don't think your fiancee was saying "masitas" and " buñuelo" are interchangeable words.



I should have been more clear. Yes, you are correct! She was just mentioning them as a side thing. The bunuelos made her think of the masitas. They are definitely not the same.
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January 16th, 2012 at 2:22:34 AM permalink
Fecha: 16 de Enero, 2011
Palabaras: Tiempo, Clima


Sorry to change the topic, but it is a new day. Today we have two related words. As I understand it:

Tiempo = Weather/Time
Clima = Climate

Before going further, I think it would be good to review the English meanings of these words. As I understand it, weather is the kind of expected variance seen on a daily basis in temperature, wind, rain, etc.. Meanwhile, climate is more of what to expect on a long-term basis. For example, I might say "The weather is hot today." I might also say "Hawaii has a tropical climate."

Now, let me introduce the lovely Leticia Castro. Every weekday I switch away from The Big Bang Theory at about 6:18 P.M. to catch the weather on Univision Channel 15. The official reason in my house is that I'm trying to improve my Spanish. However, I must confess that the weather girl has something to do with it. Okay, she has todo to do with it.

To get back on topic, you can see the identify her segment as Tiempo in the video, but Clima on the web site. You can also hear her saying clima in the video, but my Spanish isn't good enough to make out the whole sentence. This brings up the question whether tiempo and clima are interchangeable in Spanish. Or, am I right above that clima means climate. In which case, don't you think the web site is using the word incorrectly, since the show is reporting on the day to day conditions. Everybody already knows what the Vegas climate is like.

Ejemplos time

Debes ponerse un abrigo en este tiempo. = You better put on a coat in this weather.
¿Crees que la clima está cambiando? = Do you believe the climate is changing?
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pacomartin
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January 16th, 2012 at 7:57:26 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Before going further, I think it would be good to review the English meanings of these words. As I understand it, weather is the kind of expected variance seen on a daily basis in temperature, wind, rain, etc.. Meanwhile, climate is more of what to expect on a long-term basis.



Another question in English is why do we use the same basic root word for long term average of weather <<climate>> as we use for <<climb>> and for <<climax>>. What is the common denominator? (good science question)

As near as I can tell in Mexico the two words <<tiempo>> and <<clima>> are interchangeable in most speech, but if you label a website <<tiempo>> you can't immediately tell if it is about weather or time since you don't have an immediate context.

There must be a standard phrase in spanish to indicate when you are using the English version of climate. As one dictionary defines it, climate is the average weather over a period of a minimum of 30 years and possibly much longer.
Wizard
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January 16th, 2012 at 8:29:05 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Another question in English is why do we use the same basic root word for long term average of weather <<climate>> as we use for <<climb>> and for <<climax>>. What is the common denominator? (good science question)



It seems pretty obvious that clim means to to go up, or perhaps the summit itself. I'd love to have a dictionary to help with questions like this.

Quote: pacomartin

As near as I can tell in Mexico the two words <<tiempo>> and <<clima>> are interchangeable in most speech.



It would seem that way from Univision. How did they handle the Spanish subtitles in the movie An Inconvenient Truth?
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pacomartin
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January 16th, 2012 at 11:48:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It seems pretty obvious that clim means to to go up, or perhaps the summit itself. I'd love to have a dictionary to help with questions like this.

It would seem that way from Univision. How did they handle the Spanish subtitles in the movie An Inconvenient Truth?



The root Greek word κλίμα (klima) meant “region, zone, originally slope” . It would make sense that people who lived in Europe would be unaware of the climatic changes associated with the Tibetan plateau, or the deserts of the world, or the places subject to tropical climates and rainstorms. In Europe, for the most part (with exceptions like the Alps), climate was associated with your latitude. If you change latitude, it changes the angle of the sun's rays. So different regions were associated with different angles of the sun's rays, which determined the length of the day and the "climate".

Today, we are familiar with a much broader range of the world. I've been on small islands in the Caribbean with tropical rain-forest only a few miles from deserts with cacti. The term <<micro-climate>> is much more widely used in Western USA. Plus we know a lot more about variations over time. Big changes are the "little ice age", other results from Volcanic activity, manmade global warming, and "el nino". We know that the gulf stream makes parts of Europe much warmer than parts of North America at the same latitude. So we only loosely associate climate with latitude or the incline angle of the sun's rays (or the height of the sun overhead in the sky).


Wikipedia: Grupo Intergubernamental de Expertos sobre el Cambio Climático.

In all but two cases the articles uses <<climático>> for climatic. The only two cases where they use <<clima>> it is clear that they are talking about weather, and not <<climate>>.

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