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Nareed
Nareed
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January 13th, 2012 at 10:58:02 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is whether it can be used to ponder something, as in "Let me chew on your question for a while."



No.


Quote:

¡Que asco! Masticas con tu boca cerrada. = How disgusting. Chew with your mouth closed.



A letter can make a big difference. You said "How disgusting! You chew with your mouth closed."

The proper wording here is "Mastica," without the final "S." I'll leave it to Paco to determine what grammar is involved, if any.
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Wizard
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January 14th, 2012 at 8:42:58 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The proper wording here is "Mastica," without the final "S." I'll leave it to Paco to determine what grammar is involved, if any.



I think I can explain it. Mastica is both the present form for el/ella/Ud., but also the imperative form for tú.

As a refresher, the imperative form is used when giving a command, as in ordering someone to chew with his mouth closed.

Quote: Imperative conjugation for Masticar

Yo: - (You can't order yourself to do something, except maybe in a split personality kind of situation)
Tú: mastica
El, ella, Ud.: mastique
Nosotros: mastiquemos
Ellos, ellas: mastiquen

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pacomartin
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January 14th, 2012 at 9:43:16 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is whether it can be used to ponder something, as in "Let me chew on your question for a while."



To "chew someone out", or "chewing on a problem" is relatively recent only seen in writing since WWII. It is unlikely that Spanish speakers would develop the same idiom.

Yes, Mike has the correct grammatical explanation. The proper verb mood is "Imperative" and not "Indicative". Hence the single "a", instead of "as".
Wizard
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January 14th, 2012 at 11:20:34 PM permalink
Fecha: 15 de Enero, 2011
Palabra: bisiesto


I'm not sure what bisiesto means by itself, but año bisiesto means leap year. I don't think it means leap, as in to jump. That would be saltar. Could it be derivative of siesta, which every Gringo knows means nap? The "bi" troubles me. Leap years happen every four years, and the prefix "bi" means two. This also makes me wonder what is the Spanish expression for "leap day." I probably should have saved all these questions for 2/29, but I'd probably forget.

Ejemplo time

No puedo creer que es un año bisiesto ya. = I can't believe it is leap year again.
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pacomartin
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January 15th, 2012 at 5:11:11 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm not sure what bisiesto means by itself, but año bisiesto means leap year.



It is from the Latin word bissextus, literally "the twice sixth-day," because the sixth day before the Calends of March was doubled. In the English calendar we acknowledge that the extra day makes festival leap one extra day in the week.

The word has no modern use in Spanish except for the calendar.
Wizard
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January 15th, 2012 at 5:44:47 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

It is from the Latin word bissextus, literally "the twice sixth-day," because the sixth day before the Calends of March was doubled. In the English calendar we acknowledge that the extra day makes festival leap one extra day in the week.

The word has no modern use in Spanish except for the calendar.



Hmm. That seems so lonely for a word to have only one usage. What if a doughnut shop had a promotion where every sixth time you ordered a doughnut they gave you two. Could the extra doughnut, or the entire promotion, be called a buñuelo bisiesto?
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Nareed
Nareed
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January 15th, 2012 at 6:23:07 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmm. That seems so lonely for a word to have only one usage. What if a doughnut shop had a promotion where every sixth time you ordered a doughnut they gave you two. Could the extra doughnut, or the entire promotion, be called a buñuelo bisiesto?



Aw! You were doing s well today...

"Buñuelo" is a type of pastry. But the word for "doughnut" is "dona."
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pacomartin
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January 15th, 2012 at 6:39:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That seems so lonely for a word to have only one usage. What if a doughnut shop had a promotion where every sixth time you ordered a doughnut they gave you two. Could the extra doughnut, or the entire promotion, be called a buñuelo bisiesto?



You are making me hungry


According to DRAE there is a little used colloquial phrase mudar alguien bisiesto

But I think it's meaning is very specifically tied to the decision by Julius Ceasar.
Nareed
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January 15th, 2012 at 7:03:01 AM permalink
This is what buñuelos look like:


Link
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Wizard
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January 15th, 2012 at 8:22:54 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

This is what buñuelos look like:



That seems to be one definition, but I don't concede that I'm wrong either.

Buñuelo
masculine noun
1. donut (cooking) (dulce); dumpling (de bacalao)
buñuelo de viento -> donut
Copyright © 2006 Chambers Harrap Publishers Limited
Buñuelo [boo-nyoo-ay’lo]
noun
1. Fritter made of flour and eggs, and fried in oil; pancake. (m)
2. Anything poorly done or spoiled; a failure. (Colloquial) (m)

Source: buñuelo from SpanistDict.com
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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