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Wizard
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Wizard
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December 25th, 2011 at 8:41:02 PM permalink
Fecha: 25-12-11
Palabra del día: Pelea


Un otro mas Navidad una otra mas pelea. La pelea es todavía la misma. Todo es mi culpa. Soy egoista. No Tengo espíritu de Navidad. Nunca ayudo con algo. Trabajo solomente dos horas por día. Soy un imbécil en negocios. No tengo nada valor como un marido or uno padre. Este es mi vida.

Lo siento por mi español horrible.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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December 25th, 2011 at 9:54:48 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra del día: Pelea



A veces quieres huir a Puerto Vallarta y beber tequila en una playa.
Wizard
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December 26th, 2011 at 6:48:27 AM permalink
Thanks for the idiom/phrase help Nareed.

Quote: pacomartin

A veces quieres huir a Puerto Vallarta y beber tequila en una playa.



Prefiero San Jose del Cabo. Afortunadamente, no salgo el país por alcohol. Tengo una abundancia aqui para consolarme.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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December 26th, 2011 at 6:55:39 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for the idiom/phrase help Nareed.



You're welcome.

The missing one, I've yet to look up. "Capricho" means "whim." So "caprichosa" would be a woman or girl given to acting on whim, or driven by whim. I just don't know of an English one-word equivalent. And, no, "whimsy" and "whimsical" are not it.

Sorry about your other problems. I wish I could say something to help. As it is all I can offer is my support, for what little that's worth. If you want to rant or talk about it, you know how to PM me.
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pacomartin
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December 26th, 2011 at 7:47:21 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Capricho" means "whim." So "caprichosa" would be a woman or girl given to acting on whim, or driven by whim. I just don't know of an English one-word equivalent. And, no, "whimsy" and "whimsical" are not it.



Capricious is an adverb in English, but it is not often used in ordinary conversation. Arbitrary and Capricious (A&C) is a often used legal term if you are requesting a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO).

I am familiar with it in environmental law. For example you refuse to shut down a dredging operation that because the machinery kills a sea turtle once in a while. Your argument is that the operation has been going on for decades and there are still plenty of sea turtles. The activist group requests a TRO on the grounds that no environmental impact statement was prepared. The judge grants a TRO on the basis that the decision was A&C.

This book is making the charge that the Supreme Court has been A&C in their entire operations.
Wizard
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December 26th, 2011 at 6:54:33 PM permalink
Fecha: 26-12-11
Palabra: Merienda


Merienda means "snack." A related word is the verb merender, which means to eat a snack. Merienda is a nice sounding word; I think it would make for a good girl's name.

Ejemplo time.

¿Quieres helado para una merienda? = Would you like ice cream for a snack?

Quote: Nareed

Sorry about your other problems. I wish I could say something to help. As it is all I can offer is my support, for what little that's worth. If you want to rant or talk about it, you know how to PM me.



Thanks for listening, and the offer. Like most Germans, I don't communicate well, and just silently stew when I get angry. However, my pot is about ready to boil over.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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December 27th, 2011 at 4:43:38 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Merienda means "snack." A related word is the verb merender, which means to eat a snack. Merienda is a nice sounding word; I think it would make for a good girl's name.

Ejemplo time.

¿Quieres helado para una merienda? = Would you like ice cream for a snack?



It seems as if that is a fairly complicated word.

First the English word snack only seems to have acquired it's present day meaning in the last two centuries. Before that it was more related to snatch and referred to the way that a hungry dog will take food. The vulgar definition of "snatch" also refers to a 16th century definition for quick sex.

The Spanish word merienda is derived from the same Latin word that gives us the word "merit", and is also related to food that you give a dog. Dog trainers never give a dog any food, unless they respond to some command first. The word seems to have evolved just like the English word into a quick bite for people to eat.

The phrase "merienda de negros" refers to a confusion of items. I don't think that the word "negros" necessarily refers to dark skinned people in Spanish like it does in English. The equivalent British phrase would be "dog's breakfast" or "dog's dinner" which also means a confusion of items. The obvious implication is that everything got so mixed up that if you were cooking, then the result would only be fit to feed the dog.

The phrase juntar meriendas means to join forces, or to pool one's resources.

The word "merienda" is also a colloquial for hump, presumably because a camel store's fat in their hump to provide nourishment if food is not readily available.
Nareed
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December 27th, 2011 at 3:21:09 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Merienda means "snack." A related word is the verb merender, which means to eat a snack.



That would be "merendAr".

About "merienda," as I understadn it the custom is, or was, to eat a light meal late in the afternoon or early in the evening before diner. In Mexico, and as I understand in most Spanish-spakig countries, diner is around 8 pm or later. I've never partaken of the custom, though.

A similar meal is "almuerzo" (verb "almorzar"). That's a light meal eaten late in the morning or very early in the afternoon before the mid-day meal (usually call "comida"). the mid-day meal is the big meal of the day, with two courses at least (msot times), and it takes palce around 2-3 pm for most people. Again that's not something I ever did. There was a "lunch" period at school, around noon, but that was more like a snack.

Quote:

Merienda is a nice sounding word; I think it would make for a good girl's name.



I suggest you try it on a dog first :)

Quote:

¿Quieres helado para una merienda? = Would you like ice cream for a snack?



Ah, this I do know. It's "¿quieres helado para LA merienda?" You'd ask the same way if it were diner or another meal, ie "¿quieres pizza para la cena?"

Quote:

Thanks for listening, and the offer.



You're welcome. listening is about all I can do, but the offer is still open.

Quote:

Like most Germans, I don't communicate well, and just silently stew when I get angry.



I'm like that, too, and I'm not German (go figure). It must be a simple peculiarity. I do communicate well, when I want to. Much of the time, though, I'm repressing things. And that makes me angry...
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Wizard
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December 27th, 2011 at 5:24:54 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A similar meal is "almuerzo" (verb "almorzar"). That's a light meal eaten late in the morning or very early in the afternoon before the mid-day meal (usually call "comida"). the mid-day meal is the big meal of the day, with two courses at least (msot times), and it takes palce around 2-3 pm for most people. Again that's not something I ever did. There was a "lunch" period at school, around noon, but that was more like a snack.



Somewhere I read about this before. Maybe it was here. So, it would seem there are four meals a day in Mexico:

desayuno = breakfast
almuerzo = snack/first lunch
merienda = lunch
cena = dinner

Where it gets confusing for me is the word comeda seems to also carry connotations of "lunch," and comer can mean to eat lunch.

Is there any word that just means "food" in general? I know you said that your job is selling food, but how would you put that in Spanish? If you use the word comida in your repuesta, how would the listener know you didn't just sell lunch food?

Here is the passage from the book I'm reading. This is a translation of an English book where the main character came home from school and had to baby sit a younger girl. The younger girl ordered her to eat her snack in a hurry so they could play:

"Date prisa. Tienes que merendar," ordenó a Ramona mientras su abuela veía la televisión y tejia. Resultó que la merienda era un jugo de piña y galletas de centeno,...

Finally, there is an interesting discussion of American vs. Mexican Coke in this thread.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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December 27th, 2011 at 9:29:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is the passage from the book I'm reading. This is a translation of an English book where the main character came home from school and had to baby sit a younger girl. The younger girl ordered her to eat her snack in a hurry so they could play:

"Date prisa. Tienes que merendar," ordenó a Ramona mientras su abuela veía la televisión y tejia. Resultó que la merienda era un jugo de piña y galletas de centeno,...



Quote: Original English

"Hurry up and have your snack," she ordered, while her grandmother sat watching television and crocheting.
The snack turned out to be pineapple juice and Rye Crisp,...



A few observations:
1) date prisa means exactly "hurry up"
2) tienes que + infinitive means "you have to ..." whatever the infinitive verb says {Very useful phrase}
2a) Useful sentence: Que tienes que hacer hoy? means "What do you have to do today?"
3) ordenó a Ramona : the translation uses past preterite as it is an action completed in the past. Note that the translation spells out who is the recipient of the order to make it clear.
4) veía is the imperfect indicative past, while the English uses the "past progressive" tense. The literal translation for "was watching" is "estaba viendo", but it would be unlikely that a Spanish speaker would say it that way.
5) resultó is the past preterite form of "resultar" or "to turn out"
6) era is the past imperfect form of "ser" or "to be (essentially)" (*further discussion)
7) galletas are both cookies and crackers. Sometimes you see galletas saladas which are salad crackers which removes any doubt.

*Note that the English uses the infinitive form "to be", while Spanish uses the past imperfect form of "ser", or "era". It seems to me that you don't actually use "ser" in the infinitive form as often as we say "to be" in English. I have no statistics to back that up.

A natural question is what does it mean to be the preterite past of a verb ser? Certainly existence almost by definition is ongoing. The answer is that the preterite past of ser is the same as the preterite past of ir or "to go". The accidents are "fui, fuiste, fue, fuimos, fueron".

Notice that the verb "to be" in Spanish is an amalgamation of different latin verbs. It's conjugation is highly irregular. Where the infinitive is ser, present tense is "soy" ,"eres", "es" while past imperfect is "era", "eras", "era" and past preterite is "fui", "fuiste", and "fue".

But you should note that the English verb is just as irregular. The infinitive is "to be", while the accidents are "am", "are", "is", "was". "were" and the participles are "being" and "been". In addition we have the archaic forms like "art", "werst", "beest" and "be all". In fact the English verb to be is an amalgamation of several different Anglo Saxon verbs.

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