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Nareed
Nareed
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December 24th, 2011 at 9:06:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought coger meant "to grab."



It does, but:

Quote:

Speaking of coger, my tutor made it very clear to not say that word in Argentina, as it is a strong way of saying the F word.



It's so in Mexico. I had no idea it meant that in Argentina, too. it doesn't in Spain. Spaniards in Mexico get into a lot of trouble using that verb. We say "agarrar" for grab.

Quote:

Meanwhile, it is all over the children's book I'm working my way through.



Many Spanish translations are Spaniard in origin. They use other "dirty" words like "culo" (ass and/or anus) quite openly, too. Not to mention other odd words no one else uses in the way Spaniards do. For example, to say "alubia" (a type of white bean) they say "judía," which isn't really a slur but it seems like one.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 24th, 2011 at 10:55:02 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

For example, to say "alubia" (a type of white bean) they say "judía," which isn't really a slur but it seems like one.



That is pretty close
judía = bean
judia = Jewish

This popular tree is known in English as the Judas Tree, and there is a long standing myth that it is the tree that Judas Iscariot hung himself from in guilt after betraying Jesus.


The more likely theory is that Spaniards called it a "bean tree" since it has pods that look like bean pods.


In the movie Dracula 2001, they start the myth that the rope broke when Judas tried to hang himself, and he was in reality the original vampire.

In the Caribbean and other places around the world they make representations of Judas Iscariot,called a Bobolee and hang him from a tree. On Good Friday they beat Judas to death in effigy. Undoubtedly at one time in history this tradition would deter real Jews from walking around on Good Friday.
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 24th, 2011 at 7:10:33 PM permalink
Fecha: 24-12-11
Palabra del día: Plazo


Plazo means a period of time. One usage is in paying for something on an installment (plazo) plan.

Ejemplo time

Mi dentista me dijiste que puedo pagar mi cuenta en plazos. = My dentist told me I can pay my bill in installments.
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Nareed
Nareed
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December 24th, 2011 at 7:23:53 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Mi dentista me dijiste que puedo pagar mi cuenta en plazos. = My dentist told me I can pay my bill in installments.



"Mi dentista me dijO..."

You actually said "My dentist you told me..." more or less.

"Plazo" is also the closest word in Spanish to "deadline." Example:

"Tienes de plazo hasta el 31 del presente para pagar." = "Your payment deadline is the 31st of this month."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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December 24th, 2011 at 8:10:56 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You actually said "My dentist you told me..." more or less.



That is what I wanted to say. I'm trying to use tenses other than the present more often. In this case, the dentist suggested a payment plan sometime in the past.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 24th, 2011 at 8:20:50 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That is what I wanted to say. I'm trying to use tenses other than the present more often. In this case, the dentist suggested a payment plan sometime in the past.


I think you are confusing dijo and digo.

The problem is not with your tense, but with the person of the verb. Nareed didn't change tense, but he changed person. The accident dijiste is past preterite 2nd person informal, and dijo is past preterite 3rd person.

Since the phrase "My dentist told me" could be re-phrased "he told me" using a pronoun, you want to use the 3rd person, or dijo.
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 24th, 2011 at 9:11:16 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The problem is not with your tense, but with the person of the verb.



D'oh! No excuse for that one. What is my punishment?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 24th, 2011 at 9:53:05 PM permalink
My tutor has been very busy lately so I hope I can ask about some idioms I ran across. Here are some of them:

  1. En cuanto a los suyos.
  2. Para colmo.
  3. Como sea.
  4. Echaba un poco de menos.
  5. Haya puesto.
  6. Ponerse caprichosa.
  7. Darle vueltas.
  8. Que te mejores.
  9. Estuvo a punto.
  10. Hará falta.
  11. A pesar de todo.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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December 24th, 2011 at 10:15:06 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My tutor has been very busy lately so I hope I can ask about some idioms I ran across.



They aren't all idioms.

Quote:

En cuanto a los suyos.



Regarding his/her/their family/friends/colleagues/team mates/etc

Quote:

Para colmo.



On top of everything else that happened (more or less)

Quote:

Como sea.



Whatever.

Quote:

Echaba un poco de menos.



I missed someone a little.

Quote:

Haya puesto.



He/she wrote/put/placed something.

Quote:

Ponerse caprichosa.



Let me get back to you on that one (not the meaning, but what I will do)

Quote:

Darle vueltas.



Turn it around, or beating a dead horse.

Quote:

Que te mejores.



Get well

Quote:

Estuvo a punto.



He/she/it nearly did/achieved something

Quote:

Hará falta.



Something will be needed or there won't be enough of something.

Quote:

A pesar de todo.



Despite everything.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 25th, 2011 at 5:23:43 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My tutor has been very busy lately so I hope I can ask about some idioms I ran across. Here are some of them:

  1. Como sea.



I saw this glamour photo shot posted with the very appreciative statement.
La que es bella, es bella como sea...y esta dama marca la pauta!
That one is beatiful, she is beautiful as is .. and this lady sets the pace.


The phrase como sea could mean "whatever", but it could mean "however". But literally "como" means "what" or "how" or "as".

The verb sea is the English verb "is" (and also "am") but in the subjunctive and not indicative mood; so it's mood is about the hypothetical or desire.

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