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pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 23rd, 2011 at 4:00:37 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

try this one: "Rayo Vende"



Rayo Vende looks like it is literally "ray sales". It seems like a common phrase, but I can't associate it with any one kind of product. Is it an idiom for "internet sales"?
Nareed
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December 23rd, 2011 at 7:15:02 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Rayo Vende looks like it is literally "ray sales".



Not bad. "Rayo" means either beam, lightning or ray.

Quote:

It seems like a common phrase, but I can't associate it with any one kind of product. Is it an idiom for "internet sales"?



Yes and no. Another simialr one is "Mattar Vende," like that with two t's.

In this case "rayo" and "Mattar" are names, and in the sentence the're the subject. In other words "Rayo sells." The object is implied because you'll find signs saying "Rayo vende" on houses for sale. This means Rayo is the realtor involved.

I remembered it because back in high school a candidate running for class president (sort of) was a girls known as "Rayo" I never found it whether it was a nickname, family anme, or even aprt of her name. She had a well-developed sense of self-promotion, though, and hung lot sof signs, hand made, with the name "Rayo" emphasised. It was a memorable campaign for really nothing at all.

This happened at the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Suepriores de Monterrey Campus Estado de México. More popularly known, understandbly so, as "El Tec," ro sometimes "El Tec de Monterrey."
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Wizard
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December 23rd, 2011 at 7:23:38 PM permalink
Fecha: 23-12-11
Palabra: Aguantar


Today's word, aguantar means to hold. It can also mean to stand or bear something.

Ejemplo time.

Fue aguantando la bolsa cuando la policia me agarraron. = I was holding the bag when the police caught me.
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Nareed
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December 23rd, 2011 at 9:02:48 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's word, aguantar means to hold.



Not quite.

Quote:

It can also mean to stand or bear something.



That's more right, if I may incur the wrath of Sheldon Cooper ;)

See, in English, "to hold" applies to vary different actions such as holding someone's hand, and a beam holding up a roof. It doesn't work that way in Spanish. Aguantar means more holding up something, or the ability to carry something heavy. So:

Quote:

Fue aguantando la bolsa cuando la policia me agarraron. = I was holding the bag when the police caught me.



Side comment: "fuÍ," not "fuÉ" and "la policia me agarrÓ"

You need another word "Estaba sosteniendo la bolsa cuando..." works better, but ti sounds stilted and wordy. A more natural way would be tos ay "cargaba la bolsa cuando..." even though that emans "I was carrying the bag when..."

As to the word of the day, it's used more for stand or bear, as in "No aguanto más este trabajo" = "I can't stand this job any more." Used in a way that's related to holding: "¿Aguantas la caja?" = "Can you carry the box?" with the implication that the box is ehavy and you may drop it.
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pacomartin
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December 23rd, 2011 at 11:26:59 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's word, aguantar means to hold.



"To grab" is probably closer. It is related to the Italian words "agguantare" and "guantelete" (gauntlet in English). A gauntlet in it's original sense was an armored glove.

The DRAE also offers a definition of resistir pesos or "resisting weight" so it doesn't mean holding a light bag.

Quote: Nareed

A more natural way would be tos ay "cargaba la bolsa cuando..." even though that emans "I was carrying the bag when...".



The verb form cargaba is 'past imperfect' tense, which is the correct tense to use when you are talking about an action that was going on in the past when another action occurred.

As Nareed pointed out estaba sosteniendo or estaba cargando is basically the way you would say it in English, but it isn't necessary to use progressive tense in Spanish.


"cuando la policia me agarrÓ" - The interrupting action verb uses the past preterite tense.
Wizard
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December 24th, 2011 at 6:15:24 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

"To grab" is probably closer. It is related to the Italian words "agguantare" and "guantelete" (gauntlet in English). A gauntlet in it's original sense was an armored glove.



I thought coger meant "to grab." Speaking of coger, my tutor made it very clear to not say that word in Argentina, as it is a strong way of saying the F word. I asked someone down there about it and he said she was right. Meanwhile, it is all over the children's book I'm working my way through.

Quote:

As Nareed pointed out estaba sosteniendo or estaba cargando is basically the way you would say it in English, but it isn't necessary to use progressive tense in Spanish.



On my Argentina trip I started reading a pretty good book titled Breaking out of Beginner's Spanish by Joseph J. Keenan. It covered a lot of interesting and difficult topics that beginners tend to have a hard time with, but in a fun way. It devoted a few pages to the difference between the preterit and imperfect past tenses. What I took away from it is that the preterit is a softer form for something that happened once and was over. Like:

El perro ladró ayer. = The dog barked yesterday. It implies the dog did it once and it was over, as if the barking was not itself important.

The imperfect is a stronger form, for something that usually happens but this time got interrupted somehow. When using the imperfect it leads to the question, "what happened next?" For example,

El perro ladaba ayer. also means "The dog barked yesterday." However, it implies the dog usually barks, but yesterday there was something different about it. Perhaps something caused the dog to suddenly not bark, but what?

Hopefully I'm not entirely wrong in my explanation of this.
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pacomartin
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December 24th, 2011 at 6:41:25 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What I took away from it is that the preterit is a softer form for something that happened once and was over. Like:

El perro ladró ayer. = The dog barked yesterday. It implies the dog did it once and it was over, as if the barking was not itself important.

The imperfect is a stronger form, for something that usually happens but this time got interrupted somehow. When using the imperfect it leads to the question, "what happened next?" For example,

El perro ladaba ayer. also means "The dog barked yesterday." However, it implies the dog usually barks, but yesterday there was something different about it. Perhaps something caused the dog to suddenly not bark, but what?

Hopefully I'm not entirely wrong in my explanation of this.


I have never heard them described as soft or hard, but you are basically correct.

In English we often convey the "imperfect past" with either the qualifier "used to" + "present tense" (I used to eat) or we use the "past progressive" (I was eating). That conveys that it is the habitual, or it changed somehow.

In English we often convey the "preterite past" with the qualifier "did"+"present tense" (I did eat) which conveys that it was a once and done event in the past. "I did eat in breakfast this morning".

The simple past tense in English "I ate" conveys very little specific information.
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The imperfect past is for the case of something that got interrupted, but it is also for other cases such as:
(1) "The dog was barking, and my sister was shouting". Two actions going on at the same time in the past.
(2) "The dog was barking, and the door slammed". An action going on in the past, when another action occurred.
(3) "The dog used to bark every day when my sister came home". Habitual action in the past. Notice how English uses present tense.
(4) "I wanted to kill myself ...". Emotional states in the past.
(5) "It was 4:00 o'clock ...". Time of day in the past.
(6) "The dog was barking for three hours, when my sister went outside and played with him". Action in the past that lasts for specific length of time, interrupted by an event.
(7) "My sister said the dog needed to come inside". An indirect quotation in the past.

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You can imagine how difficult it is for many Spanish speakers who say "coger" as often as English speakers say "get". Spanish speaking girls visiting Argentina find that they are practically soliciting men just in the natural course of speech.

Although the verb "get" can have a sexual innuendo in English as in "I am going get some of that", it is not really vulgar. But try to avoid the verb entirely, and see how hard it is.

The six most common verbs in English are conjugations of be, have, do, say, get, & make (according to Oxford English Dictionary research).
FrGamble
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December 24th, 2011 at 7:24:41 AM permalink
Feliz Navidad y Feliz Hanukkah!
Wizard
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December 24th, 2011 at 7:38:33 AM permalink
Quote: FrGamble

Feliz Navidad y Feliz Hanukkah!



Olvidaste Kwanza.
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pacomartin
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December 24th, 2011 at 7:48:49 AM permalink
24 de diciembre - Las Calendas son fiestas populares que anuncian las celebraciones de los santos patronos de los templos de Oaxaca. Estas celebraciones fueron introducidas en la época de la colonia por los franciscanos, actualmente, éstas se han extendido a otras poblaciones del estado.



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