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pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 6th, 2011 at 9:01:17 AM permalink

I heard Lupe Ontiveros speak in San Diego. She has played a maid on TV, movies, or in the theater over 150 times in a career that stretches over 35 years.
Nareed
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December 6th, 2011 at 10:22:57 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

So I take it you would describe yourself as an "Ashkenazi Jew".



If I must.

Quote:

I often saw rice and pasta with the comida corrida in Oaxaca, but in Tijuana there is only one fine dining restaurant that serves Mexican food. The other ones are strictly French, Italian, Steakhouses, Seafood, or Mediterranean.



Overall there are few "fine" Mexican restaurants. There's a widespread notion that real Mexican food is low quality (corriente), and the best is at street stands, street markets, or in backwater towns too poor to have running water.

Take "Los Panchos." It's a middle-high level restaurant that serves some of the best carnitas in town. Sometimes my coworkers go there. But instead of sitting down in the dining room and ordering soup or an apetizer to go with their tacos, they prefer to order just tacos curb-side and eat standing up, balancing their plate precariously in one hand <sigh>

I'm a lot more high maintenance than that, of course ;) So I very seldom join them there.

Anyway, most "fine dining" places tend to be of other types of cuisine.
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Nareed
Nareed
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December 6th, 2011 at 10:35:26 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hoy es Martes, que significa Lupe esta aquí. Ella dice que un lombriz vive en la tierra, y un gusano vive en los arboles.



".. LO que significa.... unA lombriz..."
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Wizard
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Wizard 
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December 7th, 2011 at 3:39:59 AM permalink
What does this expression mean, cayó en la cuenta?

I would take it to mean he/she fell on the check (from a restaurant). However, in the context I'm getting it from it seems to mean "he/she remembered." However, why not just use recordó?

Also, this one, ni caso?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 7th, 2011 at 5:34:04 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What does this expression mean, cayó en la cuenta?

I would take it to mean he/she fell on the check (from a restaurant). However, in the context I'm getting it from it seems to mean "he/she remembered." However, why not just use recordó?

Also, this one, ni caso?



La cuenta has multiple meanings. The DRAE gives 12 definitions. But it is better tranlsated as "the account" then it is as "the check".

While the idiom caer en la cuenta literally means to "fall into the account" it is usually translated into "to realize". If you use 3rd person singular preterite tense (action in the past that is completed), cayó en la cuenta it means "he/she realized".

The idiom ni caso which literally means "or case" seems to have multiple possible translations, but whatever said sarcastically seems to be the closest to the original meaning.
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December 7th, 2011 at 9:05:19 AM permalink
Fecha: 7 de Deciembre, 2011
Estado: Mexico City
Palabra: Piedad




Although we've been talking a lot of Mexico City lately from my pictures, we've never acknowledged it the Estados de México series. This will be the last entry of the series.

According to the United Nations, Mexico City is the fifth largest "urban agglomeration" in the world. Interesting list. India makes the top ten three times, while China makes it only once. The largest city I had never heard of is Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (can I safely just call it the "Congo"?) at #29. Mexico City is the largest in North America, but we can't say it is the largest on both Americas, because Sao Paulo is higher on the list.


Benito Juarez Monument

It is hard to choose just one word for Mexico City, especially one I didn't know before. In looking at the map I see a major avenida is Viaducto Rio Piedad. Viaducto is an obvious cognate for viaduct. What is not so obvious is piedad = piety. A question for the advanced readers is how this viaduct got its name.

Ejempo time.

De las dos muchachas, prefiero Ginger. Maryanne tienes demasiadoa piedad para mí. = Of the two girls, I prefer Ginger. Maryanne has too much piety for me.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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December 7th, 2011 at 9:19:09 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

De las dos muchachas, prefiero Ginger. Maryanne tienes demasiado piedad para mí. = Of the two girls, I prefer Ginger. Maryanne has too much piety for me.



"...prefiero A Ginger. Maryanne TIENE demasiadA..."

Piedad also means "mercy" BTW

The Viaducto is named Río de la Piedad, because that's the name of the tubed river that used to be there. Why the river was anmed that, I've no idea. Now I think it carries waste water (sewage).

Oh, and the word most appropriate for Mex city is "Tráfico." :)
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Wizard
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December 7th, 2011 at 9:38:47 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Oh, and the word most appropriate for Mex city is "Tráfico." :)



From what little I saw, it wasn't that bad. Nothing to compared to what I've seen in large Chinese cities, not to mention Los Angeles and Washington DC. Panama City was also pretty bad.

And a river of sewage named piedad. That just doesn't sound pious to me. Then again, maybe it is appropriate, given my thoughts on religion.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 7th, 2011 at 10:42:34 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

From what little I saw, it wasn't that bad. Nothing to compared to what I've seen in large Chinese cities, not to mention Los Angeles and Washington DC. Panama City was also pretty bad.

And a river of sewage named piedad. That just doesn't sound pious to me. Then again, maybe it is appropriate, given my thoughts on religion.



At least Mexico City has an extensive inexpensive public transportation system. Panama City barely had functioning buses, let alone "rapid transit buses" like they have in Mexico city.
--------------------------
It may not have been a river of sewage when it was named. There are some architects who would like to uncover it and make it into a park.



The Fleet river in London underwent the same metamorphosis. It went from "raging river" to "tributary" to "sewer ditch" until it was finally buried completely. The road that follows it's course. "Fleet Street" is one of the more famous in London, because it used to contain the publishing business. People still use the term "Fleet Street" when they are talking about trashy journalism.
Wizard
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December 7th, 2011 at 11:35:43 AM permalink
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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