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Nareed
Nareed
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November 27th, 2011 at 6:16:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In this case I would have assumed trampa de turistas to mean a trap for female tourists only.



A word of a given gender doesn't necessarily denote the gender of a person being described by it. In this case, for example, the word "turistO" simply doesn't exist. Another example is the word "persona" which means person. If two men pass by, say, you can say "pasaron dos personas." You wouldn't say "pasaron dos personOs" because that word doesn't exist either.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
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November 27th, 2011 at 6:26:38 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed, do you agree with this commentary?



Not entirely.

Calling a mattress blando doesn't mean "too soft. It just means "soft." The 2nice and..." is more or less so, but it still seems infantile to use diminutives so often.

I'm of the opinion that you shouldn't talk down to children. Using cutesy words among adults, when it isn't even called for, is infantile and unseemly.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 27th, 2011 at 6:52:25 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A word of a given gender doesn't necessarily denote the gender of a person being described by it.



Thanks. I incorrectly thought the word for tourist was turisto, and you changed the last letter to a to match with trampa.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 27th, 2011 at 8:57:13 PM permalink
Here is the next picture from Mexico City. I believe this is the Mexico City Cathedral.



Sorry for this picture of myself. My last shower and shave was back in Buenos Aires.



According to Wikipedia, this is the oldest cathedral in the Americas.

I should probably introduce a word in Spanish. The current cardinal of Mexico City, who would reside there, is Card. Norberto Rivera Carrera. Carrera is Spanish for race.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Doc
Doc
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November 27th, 2011 at 9:11:24 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Carrera is Spanish for race.

So why do those Germans put a Spanish name on a Porsche? Seems atypical.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 28th, 2011 at 4:47:58 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

Quote: Wizard

Carrera is Spanish for race.

So why do those Germans put a Spanish name on a Porsche? Seems atypical.



The Carrera Panamericana was a border-to-border sports car racing event on open roads in Mexico similar to the Mille Miglia and Targa Florio in Italy. Running for five consecutive years from 1950 to 1954, it was widely held by contemporaries to be the most dangerous race of any type in the world.

Porsche did so well, that they named their new sports car introduced in 1960 in honor of the race.

Wizard,
As you probably know, Mexico City has some of the worst groundwater subsidence in the world. The Cathedral has sunk something like 15-18 feet since it was built. It is amazing to me how the buildings stand up at all.
Wizard
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November 28th, 2011 at 5:13:39 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Wizard, As you probably know, Mexico City has some of the worst groundwater subsidence in the world. The Cathedral has sunk something like 15-18 feet since it was built. It is amazing to me how the buildings stand up at all.



Actually, I did not know that. They still manage to build some pretty tall buildings there. Perhaps at some deeper point, that they dig to, the ground gets harder.

Does this groundwater explain where Mexico City gets its water from? I brought this up before, but I've always thought the placement of Mexico City was rather strange, being far from any natural source of water. At least as near as I can tell. Generally, most of the US population is close to the coasts and that of Mexico is inland. I've always been puzzled by that.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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November 28th, 2011 at 9:48:54 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Actually, I did not know that. They still manage to build some pretty tall buildings there. Perhaps at some deeper point, that they dig to, the ground gets harder.

Does this groundwater explain where Mexico City gets its water from? I brought this up before, but I've always thought the placement of Mexico City was rather strange, being far from any natural source of water. At least as near as I can tell. Generally, most of the US population is close to the coasts and that of Mexico is inland. I've always been puzzled by that.



Mexican cities are more dictated by Malaria than anything else. For much of Mexico's history, being near the ocean was to risk your life because of plagues. In the colonial period, Acapulco and Veracruz were necessary to keep the ships going to Spain, but disease was rampant. Although the diseases are now under control with modern sewage and air conditioning, very few ocean cities have developed (Cancun being a notable exception).

Mexico city was built on a lake which wasn't completely drained until the first half of the 20th century. Pumping groundwater for residential, commercial, and urban use has been the principal cause of the subsidence. Even the subway, which is only 40 years old, has some tracks that looks like they belong on a small roller coaster.
Wizard
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November 28th, 2011 at 12:02:57 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Mexican cities are more dictated by Malaria than anything else...



Thanks, I did not know that.

About the water, does Mexico City still entirely rely on ground water, or do they pipe up water from lower elevations?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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November 28th, 2011 at 12:33:52 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks, I did not know that.

About the water, does Mexico City still entirely rely on ground water, or do they pipe up water from lower elevations?



They mostly pump it from deep wells, which are now failing because the groundwater level is so low. The additional pressure on the pipes from the heavier soil is putting so many holes in the pipes that they are losing 40% of their water before reaching the surface.

A Mexican essayist says that Mexico City is the world's first "post apocalyptic" city, where he defines the apocalypse as the population explosion from the 1930-1970 which was about 5% per year and saw the city grow from 1M to 9M. Mexico city was still smaller than Los Angeles in 1930.

Quote: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1890623,00.html#ixzz1f25Vm9JZ


The reek of unwashed toilets spilled into the street in the neighborhood of unpainted cinder block houses. Out on the main road, hundreds of residents banged plastic buckets and blocked the path of irate drivers while children scoured the surrounding area for government trucks.
...

About five million people, or a quarter of the population of Mexico City's urban sprawl, woke up Thursday with dry taps. The drought was caused by the biggest stoppage in the city's main reservoir system in recent years to ration its depleting supplies.
...

It is perhaps unsurprising that the biggest metropolis in the Western hemisphere is confronting problems with its water supply and becoming an alarming cautionary tale for other megacities. Scientists have been talking for years about how humans are pumping up too much water while ripping apart too many forests, and warning that the vital liquid could become the next commodity nations are fighting over with tanks and bombers. But it is hard for most people to appreciate quite how valuable a simple thing like water is until the taps turn off.
...
Paradoxically, the thirsty city was once a great lake, where the Aztecs founded their island citadel Tenochtitlan in 1325. When the Spanish conquerors took control they drained much of the water, laying the basis for the vast expansion of the metropolis across the entire Valley of Mexico. However, as the growing population continues to suck water out in wells, Mexico City is sinking down into the old lake bed at a rate of about three inches a year.
...
With its own supplies evaporating, Mexico City relies on the Cutzamala system, a network of reservoirs and treatment plants that pump in water from hundreds of miles around. However, this year Cutzamala itself is running dry amid low levels of rainfall in the area. Its main basin is only 47% full, compared to an annual average of 70% for early April.



Many planners believe that it is vital to build a high speed rail link from Mexico City to Querétaro (roughly 130 miles) to encourage development in the relatively undeveloped state. It is also much more feasible than going through the mountains to Puebla, Cuernevaca, Tlaxcala or Toluca.

The USA is very fortunate that our society developed around so many different cities. Most countries have a dominant mega city or two mega cities (like Spain).

This map shows the city a century after the conquest. It is still largely an island.

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