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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 19th, 2011 at 7:06:11 PM permalink
I think I can shed some light on the difference between a cascada y catarata. A cascada is a single waterfall, and catarata is a whole group of them.

In attaining this information a new word popped up, salto. This is evidently equivalent to cascada, but preferred in Argentina, where I am told they never say cascada.
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Nareed
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November 19th, 2011 at 7:35:18 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In attaining this information a new word popped up, salto. This is evidently equivalent to cascada, but preferred in Argentina, where I am told they never say cascada.



"Salto" means jump. There are a number of falls with "salto" in their name, so maybe it's come to mean that, too (I imagine as a place where water "jumps" off the face of a cliff). But the meaning is jump.
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pacomartin
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November 20th, 2011 at 4:59:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I think I can shed some light on the difference between a cascada y catarata. A cascada is a single waterfall, and catarata is a whole group of them.

In attaining this information a new word popped up, salto. This is evidently equivalent to cascada, but preferred in Argentina, where I am told they never say cascada.



In my earlier comment on the cascada and catarata I found examples that countered that general rule. The wikipedia listed several words that are used, including "salto", but no rule was scientifically followed. A lot has to do with the local custom.

For instance there was a picture of single fall only a few inches high called a frozen catarata.

Interestingly enough, "cascada" is a Spanish word derived from an Italian word (not a Latin word). I think that is the first time I've seen that etymology.

catarata.(Del lat. cataracta, y este del gr. καταράκτης).1. f. Cascada o salto grande de agua.
cascada.(Del it. cascata, caída). 1. f. Caída desde cierta altura del agua de un río u otra corriente por brusco desnivel del cauce.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 20th, 2011 at 1:41:58 PM permalink
Fecha: 20 de Noviembre, 2011
Estado: Zacatecas
Palabra: cobre




Today's state is Zacatecas. It is home of NY Jets QB Mark Sanchez. Zacatecas largest industry is mining, including oro (gold), plata (silver), and cobre (copper). I am making "cobre" the SWD, because I already knew oro y plata.

Ejemplo time.

Si llevas esta pulsera de cobre, nunca vas a enfermar. = If you wear this copper bracelet, then you will never get sick.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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November 20th, 2011 at 3:30:41 PM permalink
Si usted usa esta pulsera de cobre, entonces nunca se va a enfermar.

It is very common to say that the greatest export of Zacatecas is people. Over half of s Zacatecanos live outside of the country. Because it is a good day's drive from Texas, it is a frequent stopover place.

The capital city of the same name is a beautiful old mining city that is now a university town.


There is not a real strong presence of indigenous people in this state. The geography is dominated by the forests and mountains.

The old bullring has been turned into a hotel. The food is great, but wine is very expensive here. In general steer clear of wine in Mexico.
Wizard
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November 20th, 2011 at 3:51:22 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Si usted usa esta pulsera de cobre, entonces nunca se va a enfermar.



That looks just like what I got when I put my sentence through GoogleTranslate. I promised Nareed I wouldn't use that as an excuse for my ejemplos, but I still consider what it has to say when I'm having trouble. In this case:

1. I'm not big the formality of Ud. Yes, I know there are situations where it is appropriate, but when in doubt I prefer the friendliness of tú. My example also doesn't sound like the kind of thing you would say in a stuffy formal setting.

2. We use the word "use" a lot in English (see I just did), but it seems like I don't see usar much in Spanish, except in Google translations. I am not saying it is wrong, but I thought that usually people use llevar for wearing clothing/jewelry. Why, I don't get, as llevar is supposed to mean "take," but I've learned that certain verbs like this one are just troublemakers, with lots of other usages.

3. I was on the fence about using the entonces, which I take to mean "so" and maybe "thus." In this case neither word seemed to fit, so I nixed it. Then again, I know I've seen it in proper translations when I wasn't expecting it.

4. I wasn't sure why the se was in there, so I nixed that too. I thought my vas, or your va implied who wouldn't get sick.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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November 20th, 2011 at 4:55:38 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That looks just like what I got when I put my sentence through GoogleTranslate. I promised Nareed I wouldn't use that as an excuse for my ejemplos, but I still consider what it has to say when I'm having trouble. In this case:



Good choice :)

Quote:

1. I'm not big the formality of Ud.



Again, good choice. As a quick rule of thumb, you use "tú" with family, friends, and people much younger than you, especially children and teens. Everyone else rates "usted."

Quote:

2. We use the word "use" a lot in English (see I just did), but it seems like I don't see usar much in Spanish, except in Google translations. I am not saying it is wrong, but I thought that usually people use llevar for wearing clothing/jewelry. Why, I don't get, as llevar is supposed to mean "take," but I've learned that certain verbs like this one are just troublemakers, with lots of other usages.



The word "wear" gave me trouble when I learned English. There is no exact literal translation. Paco's right by suggesting "usar," but in this example you could also go with "poner": "Si te pones esta pulsera...." This means "If you put on this bracelet..." and it would assume you won't take it off at night when you get ready for bed.

But overall if you habitually wear some kind of clothing, makeup, jewelry, perfume, etc, you'd say "uso."

Quote:

3. I was on the fence about using the entonces, which I take to mean "so" and maybe "thus."



It means "then." It can go in your phrase, but it's not necessary. In fact, when I use "Si/Entonces" or "If/Then" in a sentence, I feel like I'm programming in BASIC :)

Quote:

4. I wasn't sure why the se was in there, so I nixed that too.



Good choice. You can use it, but again it's not necessary. Most native speakers would use it, in the form of "te" if you're pairing it with "tu," but you'd be understood and it is correct not to use it.


So:

"Si usas esta pulsera de cobre, nunca vas a enfermar."

I'd reply to that, BTW, like this: "Si crees eso, tengo un puente en Brooklyn que está a la venta." :P
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pacomartin
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November 20th, 2011 at 5:04:28 PM permalink
Si usted usa
Si usas
Si llevas

I usually think of posting to a forum as more formal, so I am inclined to use the formal address. I have looked at many different forums about the best SPanish verb for "to wear". I read passionate arguments for "llevar", and equally passionate people who claim the "levar" sounds very strange. It seems to vary a lot by country of origin.

BTW: The English verb use is the most commonly used verb with a Latin root. The Anglo Saxon verb has drifted into obscurity. In most other cases, we tend to use the Anglo Saxon verb more commonly, and the Latin based verb for more elevated speech.

esta pulsera de cobre,
este brazalete cobrizo,

i would go with the first translation as well, but I have also seen these words in dictionaries

entonces nunca se va a enfermar.
entonces nunca te vas a enfermar.
entonces nunca conseguirás enfermo.

I would use entonces because I hear it a lot. But it reminds my of my recent question to Nareed about using "dicho". It seems like an unnecessary word.

Once again you can use the morphological future tense (inflection), or the periphrastic future tense (va or vas a + infinitive). I still think you are going to hear the morphological future in Argentina. Personally, I would have trouble recognizing it, since I always forget those endings. It is easier when you see them in writing since they have the accents, but impossible to hear verbally.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 20th, 2011 at 5:07:52 PM permalink
Thanks for your comments, as always.

Quote: Nareed

"Si crees eso, tengo un puente en Brooklyn que está a la venta." :P



Cuánta cuesta? Why isn't it por venta? Or maybe para. Here in Vegas you see signs on very-used cars that say, I think, para vender. If that is wrong, the mistake is mine.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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November 20th, 2011 at 5:12:04 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

entonces nunca conseguirás enfermo.



That actually means "You'll never get a sick man." :)
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