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Nareed
Nareed
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November 15th, 2011 at 3:01:21 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Es probablemente mia culpa. This sounds vaguely familiar to me too. However, I have to hear something about 20 times before it is filed under permanent memory.



I moved over 4 years ago and I still can't always recall my "new" phone number :)

I could go over it again, but I might not go exactly teh same. The perils of posting at work and tired, you know...

Oh, but I can tell you something else. I got into a small discussion with my electrologist on whether it was right to say "la anestesia." We decided it was, and she swore she'd never heard a client say "el anestesia." But it's also right to say "el anestésico." which would be "the anesthesia" and "the anesthetic" respectively. Things are going very well in that respect, too, especially now that I've finally figured out how to use "la anestesia" :P
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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 15th, 2011 at 7:40:10 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I got into a small discussion with my electrologist on whether it was right to say "la anestesia." We decided it was, and she swore she'd never heard a client say "el anestesia." But it's also right to say "el anestésico." which would be "the anesthesia" and "the anesthetic" respectively. Things are going very well in that respect, too, especially now that I've finally figured out how to use "la anestesia" :P



In English if you end a noun with "ist", usually with cist or gist, then it generally becomes somebody who practices in that field. Like somebody who practices biology is a biologist. Someone who practices anestesia is an anesthesiologist. Is there a rule of thumb in Spanish? I would guess the word would end is ista. Por ejemplo, someone who practices with dientes is a dentista. But a professional driver is not a manejista but a conductor (correct me if I'm wrong).

In other news, I asked the niece of my tutor about my last SWD ejemplo. She said that both "va a hacer" and "hara" are acceptable. To be specific, "va a hacer" implies that the subject is going to do whatever soon, and the future tense implies further out into the future.
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Nareed
Nareed
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November 15th, 2011 at 8:15:49 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I would guess the word would end is ista. Por ejemplo, someone who practices with dientes is a dentista. But a professional driver is not a manejista but a conductor (correct me if I'm wrong).



Well, in English someone who drives professionally is not a drivist, either :)

But, yeah, in Spanish things aren't so neat. A manicurist would be a manicurista. But I can't think of more examples off-hand. Oh, "conductor" is technically correct, but the more usual word is "chofer," which I'm sure you can guess where it comes from. A truck driver, for example, would be a "chofer de trailer," a bus driver is a "chofer de camión." A race-car driver would be a "piloto," which usually means pilot but it's used that way for some reason.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 16th, 2011 at 4:18:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In other news, I asked the niece of my tutor about my last SWD ejemplo. She said that both "va a hacer" and "hara" are acceptable. To be specific, "va a hacer" implies that the subject is going to do whatever soon, and the future tense implies further out into the future.



I think it is a little more complicated. Linquists call the inflective form of the future, a morphological form and the "va a hacer" a periphrastic form. My tutor said that Mexicans only use the periphrastic form. What I've read is that it is a complex interaction between perceived "social class" of the speaker, the "country dialect" of Spanish, and the "evolved form of the Spanish". By the third statement I mean the older forms of Spanish inland in South America where traditions are preserved (similar to older versions of English in Appalachia or parts of the deep South).


Quote: Periphrastic and morphological future forms in Bogotá Spanish: A preliminary sociolinguistic study of upper class speakers

As for Colombian Spanish, only a handful of studies have focused on examining periphrastic and morphological future forms. Montes (1962), one of the first authors to analyze this subject matter by means of natural data, studied various future forms in popular speech novels, newspapers, magazines and personal letters. Although his study does not provide a quantitative account of the forms, it concludes that the morphological form is rarely found in texts that represent popular speech (mainly from Western Colombia), and that the periphrastic form is predominant in this country. In Central Colombia, specifically in the area of Bogotá, the morphological form is still found to be abundant, which the author attributes to the traditional and archaic characteristics of this particular dialect.

pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 16th, 2011 at 4:58:42 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Quote: pacomartin

portar means "to carry"


I thought llevar is to carry. For example, if you want to order food "to go," you would say para llevar. Entonces, como son llevar y portar differente?



"Portar" means to carry something with you, i.e. to "bring" it."LLevar" means to carry something away, i.e. to "remove" it. I assume you are thinking from the perspective of the restaurant owner. They ask you "Para llevar?" or do you want to take it away from me?
Wizard
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November 16th, 2011 at 6:39:33 AM permalink
Entonces, como es traer differente de portar?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
NowTheSerpent
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November 16th, 2011 at 6:48:46 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Quote: Wizard

Quote: pacomartin

portar means "to carry"


I thought llevar is to carry. For example, if you want to order food "to go," you would say para llevar. Entonces, como son llevar y portar differente?



"Portar" means to carry something with you, i.e. to "bring" it."LLevar" means to carry something away, i.e. to "remove" it. I assume you are thinking from the perspective of the restaurant owner. They ask you "Para llevar?" or do you want to take it away from me?



What about para salir?
Nareed
Nareed
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November 16th, 2011 at 6:51:07 AM permalink
Quote: NowTheSerpent

What about para salir?



That means "to exit," or "to go out."

It is used, though: Compré este vestido para salir a bailar = I bought ths dress to go out dancing.
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Nareed
Nareed
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November 16th, 2011 at 6:58:24 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Entonces, como es traer differente de portar?



"Portar" denotes to carry somethign on you, like a gun or a checkbook. But hardly anyone uses the word "portar" anyway. I think it's been mostly relegated to a legal term. For example, if you carrya gun without a permit (and I don't know if such permits even exist), you're charged with "portación ilícita de armas."

Derivations of the word are much in use. A portable device is called "portatil," whether you carry it on you, like a cell phone, or with you, like a laptop.

If I were you I'd simply keep in mind the meaning of "portar" and refrain from using the word. Most people will understand "llevar" just fine.
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Nareed
Nareed
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November 16th, 2011 at 7:02:16 AM permalink
Quote: NowTheSerpent

That's interesting. Now that I think about it, the signs at El Super with "jitomates" were over the red tomatoes. I don't deal with any other kind, so I must have overgeneralized quite a bit. Thx. :)



You're welcome.

BTW I suppose you should uderstand this advertising phrase "¿Vas al super o a La Comer?" Comercial Mexicana has been milking it for years now. They should get tired of it any month... Walmart's "Bueno, es que Hiper es más que Super, ¿no?" campaign sort of fizzled early on.
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