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Nareed
Nareed
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November 14th, 2011 at 7:35:25 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The word 'avocado' comes from the Spanish aguacate [..]



I don't quite see how you get from one to the other. Except, perhaps, if by the 15th Century Spaniards still used the Latin V as an U.
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teddys
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November 14th, 2011 at 7:42:09 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

That is an amazing painting. Says so much on so many levels. I really think Orozco, Rivera, Kahlo et al. are some of the best ever.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
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November 14th, 2011 at 10:05:52 AM permalink
Quote: teddys

That is an amazing painting. Says so much on so many levels. I really think Orozco, Rivera, Kahlo et al. are some of the best ever.



Now that Volaris airlines is partnering with Southwest Airlines it is easy and cheap to get to Guadalajara from Vegas, Chicago Midway, and 7 California airports. You will see the best Orozco murals.


It's a fun city.

You have to go to Mexico City to see Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo's work.
teddys
teddys
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November 14th, 2011 at 10:34:36 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Now that Volaris airlines is partnering with Southwest Airlines it is easy and cheap to get to Guadalajara from Vegas, Chicago Midway, and 7 California airports. You will see the best Orozco murals.

It's a fun city.

You have to go to Mexico City to see Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo's work.

Yes, but see my other thread about Mexico.

One of the best Diego Rivera murals is right here in Detroit, at the Institute of Art. Absolutely incredible -- a must see. This is just a portion:
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 14th, 2011 at 3:10:03 PM permalink
Fecha: 14 de Noviembre, 2011
Estado: Veracruz
Palabra: caldo





Today's state is Veracruz. It has a large coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. A popular dish in Veracruz is caldo de mariscos. Wikipedia translated that to "seafood soup." Mariscos is a word we Gringos see a lot on restaurant cartas (menus) and signs. However, I never never understood if it is supposed to mean seafood in general, or specifically shellfish. Caldo is a new word to me. Spanishdict.com translates is as "broth," but Wikipedia translates it as "soup." So I hope the advanced readers can help shed some light on the common usage of both marisco y caldo.

Ejemplo time.

Si nos portamos, Maryann va a hacer el caldo de mariscos para la cena. = If we behave ourselves, Marryann will make seafood soup for dinner.
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Nareed
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November 14th, 2011 at 4:00:02 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, I never never understood if it is supposed to mean seafood in general, or specifically shellfish.



Mariscos refers to anything living underwater that is neither fish nor some kind of seaweed or other underwater vegetation: shrimp, squid, octopus, oysters, clams, etc. It's all inedible anyway :P

Quote:

Caldo is a new word to me. Spanishdict.com translates is as "broth," but Wikipedia translates it as "soup." So I hope the advanced readers can help shed some light on the common usage of both marisco y caldo.



Caldo = Broth
Sopa = Soup

A "caldo" qualifies as soup, though. but not all soups qualify as "caldo."

Of course usage is another matter. A bowl of chicken broth with a half breast, rice and chickpeas is called "caldo de pollo." A soup made of lima beans, some bacon and onion is called "caldo de habas." The same soup made with lentils instead of lima beans, is called "sopa de lentejas." Any milk or cream based soups, though, like cream of mushroom, clam chowder or tomato soup, are never called "caldo." They're either "crema" meaning cream, or "sopa."

I've no idea where that leaves gazpacho...


Quote:

Si nos portamos, Maryann va a hacer el caldo de mariscos para la cena. = If we behave ourselves, Marryann will make seafood soup for dinner.



Drop the "el" in "el caldo." Maryann won't be making "the seafood soup."

But the first part of the sentence is problematic. In English saying "if we behave..." implies you'll be well behaved. In Spanish there is no such implication. Think of it as saying "if our behavior is," without qualifying it. Further, it depends on your views about mariscos. So I would say "Si nos portamos mal..." While I think you meant "Si nos portamos bien..."

BTW all this reminds me of a rather good, very old, SF novel by Cliff Simak called "Waystation." There's an alien named Ulysses constantly referring to coffee as "the coffee." What's not to like about a kindly, coffee-addict alien? :)
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pacomartin
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November 14th, 2011 at 4:10:21 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 14 de Noviembre, 2011
Palabra: Cuna

Si nos portamos, Maryann va a hacer el caldo de mariscos para la cena. = If we behave ourselves, Marryann will make seafood soup for dinner.



Wiz, you forgot to update the palabra.


Note that you used va a hacer instead of the future tense of hacer, which would be hará

Google translates as Maryann hará sopa de mariscos para la cena.

I am willing to bet that your tutor would use the "tiempo futuro" since I think that Argentines prefer the more formal syntax. I was told that Mexican mostly use the more informal future tense "conjugation of ir + 'a' + infinitive ".
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 14th, 2011 at 11:53:12 PM permalink
That is interesting about it not being implied that portarse means to behave well. It certainly is the case in English that "behave" implies "behave well."

We don't need to go to my tutor on hara, I admit I was wrong.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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November 15th, 2011 at 3:34:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

We don't need to go to my tutor on hara, I admit I was wrong.



You were not wrong, you simply used a more casual way of indicating the future. Grammatically it is called futuro perifrástico.

In english periphrasis is taken literally from Greek and Latin and means "circumlocution," or to "speak in a roundabout way," from peri- "round about" + phrazein "to express."

It is very common in Mexico to not use the future tense, but to express the future the way you did. In Spain they are much more apt to use the future tense. I assume the same is true in Argentina, but I am not certain.

The English future tense is also periphrastic: it is normally formed with an auxiliary verb (shall or will) followed by the base form of the main verb. So Mexican Spanish in this sense follows the English paradigm.
Nareed
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November 15th, 2011 at 6:47:38 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That is interesting about it not being implied that portarse means to behave well. It certainly is the case in English that "behave" implies "behave well."



ON that, I realized something later on. If you'd said "Si nos comportamos, Maryann..." you'd have had it right. "Comportar" also means "to behave" but when used by itself, as when an annoyed mother lovingly yells to her misbehaving child "¡Compórtate!" it means "behave well!" Sorry about the omission

Quote:

We don't need to go to my tutor on hara, I admit I was wrong.



Not wrong at all. You might have said "...Maryann nos va a hacer..." but the way you used it was just fine.

BTW, is it Maryann or Mary Anne?
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