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Nareed
Nareed
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November 11th, 2011 at 10:52:35 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's state is Tamaulipas.



As a cultural note, the people of Nuevo León often say Tamaulipas stole their border with the US :)

Quote:

Mi corazón palpita más rápido cada vez que veo Ginger nadar en la laguna. = My heart beats faster each time I see Ginger swim in the lagoon.



"... que veo A Ginger...."
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pacomartin
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November 11th, 2011 at 11:29:01 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

As a cultural note, the people of Nuevo León often say Tamaulipas stole their border with the US :)



Most people are aware of the Republic of Texas which existed for almost a decade.
- Independence from Mexico March 2, 1836
- Annexation by the United States of America December 29, 1845

There was also an even shorter lived Republic of the Rio Grande which existed for less than a year in 1840 with it's capital at Laredo. The territory was part of the former states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas.

The Laredo newspaper has a 7th flag for the traditional Six Flags over Texas + flag of the Republic of the Rio Grande .

As a reminder the six flags are:
1) Spain (1519 to 1685) & (1690-1821)
2) France (1685-1690) - Fort Saint Louis was a French colony
2) Mexico (1821-1836) [battle of the Alamo from 23 Feb to 6 March 1836]
4) Republic of Texas (1836-1845)
5) United States (1845-1861) & (1865-present)
6) Confederacy (1861-1865)


Although France is one of the flags over Texas, it is unrelated to the better known and much later French intervention in Mexico of 8 December 1861 - 21 June 1867. France took advantage of the civil war in the USA, thinking that they would not enforce the pledge of the American government not to permit any European powers to return in force to the Western hemisphere. Even though this was 50 years after Mexico's declaration of independence, there was still powerful people in Mexico who wanted a monarchy restored in their country.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 11th, 2011 at 11:49:04 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

As a side note, I hope you ask your tutor my previous questions about the use of the subjunctive mood for the verb "ser". I am curious if she follows Nareed's translation, or on this point if there is a difference between Argentine and Mexican Spanish.



Can you remind me specifically what the question was?
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Nareed
Nareed
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November 11th, 2011 at 11:55:06 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Yes, it is the same word. The literal meaning is more to "throb" or to "flutter".



I won't get into all that. "Palpitar" does connote rapid beating of the heart, rather than the normal rythm. The word "palpitaciones" means an irregular heartbeat.

The regular, common heartbeat is called "latido," the infinitive is "latir." Forms of it also mean "hunch." I've mentioned this in connection with the lotto known as "Melate" (propeprly it should be "me late"). Example: "Me late que la bola va a caer en seis = I've a hunch the ball will fall on six."
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Wizard
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November 11th, 2011 at 12:15:21 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Me late que la bola va a caer en seis = I've a hunch the ball will fall on six."



What is the difference between a bola y pelota? Is bola Spanglish for ball?
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Nareed
Nareed
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November 11th, 2011 at 1:11:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What is the difference between a bola y pelota? Is bola Spanglish for ball?



"Bola" is "ball." "Pelota" is a kind of ball used in sports. "Balón" is a ball filled with air which can be refilled at pleasure.

So, for example, when saying "The QB passed the ball," you can say "el coreback (that's my transliteration of how the word "quarterback" is pronounced here) pasó la bola/el balón/la pelota" indsitinctly. Buit if you're talking about roulette, it will be 2la bola" or "la bolita" every time. No one would call a roulette ball "pelota," and much less "balón."

Bola may also mean a bunch of things, or a small mob of people.
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Nareed
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November 11th, 2011 at 1:49:05 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

(4) "the early bird gets the worm"



How about the oppsite?

I'm not sure of the wording, but the thing never made sense to me: No por mucho madrugar se despierta más tamprano."

"Madrugar" means waking up or being up very ealy in the day, say around 5 am. I'm not sure it's a real verb, but it's used that way. "Madrugada," which is a noun, does mean the very early part of the day.

Rather than attempt a translation, I'll explain the meaning: getting up early doesn't guarantee you'll be able to get somewhere on time, or accomplish your goals for the day, or gettign any kind of advantage. So it means the opposite of the English idiom.

When an English idiom gives me trouble is because I'm unfamilair with it, and/or I can't discern it's meaning readily. For instance, I know what the expression "the apple of my eye" means. It refers to someone you are very fond of, someone close to you whom you hold in high esteem. But I've no idea why it means that.
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Doc
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November 11th, 2011 at 1:51:36 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Balón" is a ball filled with ....


I read to that point in the sentence and had this anticipation that it would end, "... water and used by children to throw at each other in mock battles." Just couldn't look at "balón" and not read "balloon".


Edit in response to post above: Old quip -- "Ya may be the apple of your mother's eye, but ya ain't appealin' to me."
Nareed
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November 11th, 2011 at 2:09:30 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

I read to that point in the sentence and had this anticipation that it would end, "... water and used by children to throw at each other in mock battles." Just couldn't look at "balón" and not read "balloon".



The word "balloon" gave me a lot of trouble. Clearly it's related to "balón" and I suspect it comes via French.

Anyway, the word for "balloon" is "globo." A water balloon is a "globo de agua."

And that "de" will mess with the Wizard, too. Some native Spanish speakers will argue it should be "globo con agua." Likewise if you want a glass of milk you should ask for a "vaso con leche." The reasoning is that saying "vaso de leche," means a glass made of milk, while "vaso con leche" means a glass filled with milk. The correct way is to say "vaso de leche," but the explanation as to why it's correct is a bit complicated.
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pacomartin
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November 11th, 2011 at 5:30:23 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Can you remind me specifically what the question was?



It was a two part question.

Quote: pacomartin

PART I
Which one of these phrases is correct?
(1) Busco un libro que sea interesante.
(2) Busco un libro que es interesante.

My verb book says to use sea, but at the same time the google translate used es.
I was curious if it was a somewhat archaic grammatical rule.
The reason given in the book is "In an adjectival clause if the antecedent is something or someone that is indefinite, negative, vague or nonexistent, you should use the subjunctive mood ... 'un libro' is indefinite ...
Notice, however, that the subjunctive is not used in English." Clearly Nareed thought it should be es, and the grammar rule is archaic.

PART II
Quoting the lyrics from a very famous Argentine protest song from the 1970's (in the subjunctive mood).
It confuses me what is the best translation:

Solo le pido a Dios
Que el dolor no me sea indiferente


"I only ask of God
He not let me be indifferent to pain" (1)
That I may not be indifferent to pain" (2)
That the pain is not indifferent to me" (3)

I would go with #2, but I see it translated as #1 or #3 in some cases (like the link above).

I think this may be a good question for your Argentine tutor. The song is 33 years old, but in all probability she has heard it.



It would probably impress her if you can sing two or three lines from the song. There are multiple versions on youtube. Mercedes Soza was a national icon in Argentina. She died a few years ago. Her cover was probably the most famous.

León Gieco - The writer of the song

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