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Wizard
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Wizard
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October 31st, 2011 at 9:36:09 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I learned it was supposed to be called that from a dubbed Charlie Brown cartoon :)

BTW for tomorrow, if you don't mind disrupting your license plate series, you may want to use the word "calavera." Look it up in connection with the día de los muertos.



Thanks for the suggestion.

The Telemundo web site has a video on the main page where it it addressed three ways, the two already discussed, plus día de los muertos. This is not the first time I've seen American Spanish television mention different terms for the same thing.

I love all the classic Peanuts shows, especially Christmas and Halloween. I've always thought Linus' belief in the Great Pumpkin was a brilliant analogy to religion in general.
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Nareed
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October 31st, 2011 at 10:03:34 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I love all the classic Peanuts shows, especially Christmas and Halloween. I've always thought Linus' belief in the Great Pumpkin was a brilliant analogy to religion in general.



Did you see the Simpson's spoof? Milhouse plays Linus, Bart is Charlie and Lisa is Sally. Anyway, La Gran Calabaza comes to life and is very upset to find humans eat pumpkins :) When he comes upon a plate of roasted pumpkin seeds, he exclaims in horror "You eat the unborn!"
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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 1st, 2011 at 9:34:38 AM permalink
Fecha: 1 de Noviembre, 2011
Estado: Nayarit
Palabra: ceboruco




Nareed suggested I make calavera (skull) the word of the day today, pero no entiendo por que. I can't find anything to do with skull with today's state, Nayarit. I can say say that Nayarit is a state I have been to when I spent a day in Puerto Vallarta on a cruise. For gringos who need anything otherwise hard to find in Mexico, there is a huge Walmart by the cruise ship docks.


Today's word of the day shall be ceboruco, which is a volcano in Nayarit, and means a "rough rocky place." Given all the mountain climbing I like to do around Vegas, this word will come in handly incase I should be so fortunate as to meet a nice muchacha on the montaña.


Ejemplo time.

Los pasajeros de la Minnow no podrían quedado no había el barco estrellado al ceboruco. = The passengers of the Minnow would not have been stranded had the boat not crashed in the rocky place.

Hopefully I will get at least one word right.

In other Spanish news, hoy es Martes, which means I get to torture my housekeeper Lupe with my Español horrible.

First, I asked her how to say Halloween in Spanish. She said "día de los muertos." My follow-up question was why do they sometimes call it "día de las brujas." She said that in Mexico they call November 1 and 2 (correct me if I'm wrong) "día de los muertos," but since Halloween is so similar in theme, they extend it to October 31 for trick-or-treating purposes in the U.S.. So then I asked who do some call it "día de las brujas." She speculated that Spanish-speaking children born in the U.S. probably call it that, but those born in Mexico, as Lupe was, tend to cling harder to old traditions from back home.

Second, I asked how to say "trick or treat" in Spanish. She said most would just say "trick or treat" in English. However, in Mexico, on día de los muertos sometimes children would say "dame una calavera." = "Give me a skull." At first, I thought she meant calabaza = pumpkin. I now see that spanishdict.com also says that calavera can mean "sugar skull (dulce)." Entonces, that must be why Nareed brought up the word. A Halloween reference, as opposed to anticipating discussion about Nayarit.

Okay, I've run out of things to say ... a long time ago.
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pacomartin
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November 1st, 2011 at 10:30:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I can't find anything to do with skull with today's state, Nayarit.
I can say say that Nayarit is a state I have been to when I spent a day in Puerto Vallarta on a cruise.




¿Ha visitado Nuevo Vallarta en la nave? La frontera entre Nayarit y Jalisco se encuentra muy cerca del aeropuerto. Puerto Vallarta se encuentra en Jalisco y Nuevo Vallarta en Nayarit.


Yo estaba atrapado en una tormenta terrible, justo al norte de Nayarit durante 24 horas. La distancia de Mazatlán a Tepic es sólo 167 millas y me llevó tres días terribles que ir tan lejos.
Doc
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November 1st, 2011 at 10:38:47 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

... I spent a day in Puerto Vallarta on a cruise. For gringos who need anything otherwise hard to find in Mexico, there is a huge Walmart by the cruise ship docks.

What is the Spanish for "Deja vu"? I spent one day in 2007 as a cruise ship stop in Puerto Vallarta. I sent a typically-sarcastic email message to some of my friends:
Quote: My email

Today, our ship arrived in the beautiful village of Puerto Vallarta and
docked across from a lovely WalMart Super Center, emblazoned in red script
letters with the traditional "Siempre". How wonderful it is to see all of
the local color!

I took a couple of cell phone photos that day, but I have been scratching my calavera trying to find one of the WalMart. Must not have bothered.

Edit: With regard to Mr. Martin's comments, on my cruise I just took Holland America's word for what town we were in, and I rarely if ever looked to see what state we were in (other than "confusion").
Nareed
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November 1st, 2011 at 11:05:08 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

What is the Spanish for "Deja vu"?



What is English for deja vu? :P


Quote: My email

Today, our ship arrived in the beautiful village of Puerto Vallarta and
docked across from a lovely WalMart Super Center, emblazoned in red script
letters with the traditional "Siempre". How wonderful it is to see all of
the local color!



Actually, belive it or not, it is local.

Once upon a time there were a bunch of supermarkets called "Aurrera," belonging to grupo Aurrera. It later got renamed Grupo Cifra. Around that time it started a joint venture with Walmart. At first to set up Sam's Club warehosue stores, which at first were called "Club Aurrera." Later they set up a Walmart where Aurrera owned a really big store called Gran Bazar (at the time I lived about a mile from there). It was the first Walmart in Mexico, and eventually the first Walmart Supercenter in the world, as the story's told here. the model was exported to the US.

A little later, Walmart acquired Cifra. They turned all the Aurrera brand stores to Walmart, but left the small, upscale(ish) stores witht eh name "Superama" and the big, diccount, but not in bulk, stores with the name "Bodega Aurrera." The controlling company is called "Nueva Walmart de Mexico, S de RL de CV" (the letters mean Sociedad de Responsabilidad Limitada de Credito Vigente; roughly Limited Liability Assosiacion of Current Credit).

A few years back, it celebrated a 50th or 60th anniversary in mexico, meaning the Walmart people see themselves as continuing what Aurrera started.

If that's not enought, the local Walmart stores each have a tortilleria for making hot tortillas, and a bakery with things like conchas, orejas, banderillas, espejos, rebanadas de mantequilla, polvorones and other Mexican pastries and cookies.

The conglomerate also includes the Suburbia department stores (mostly clothes), the VIPS restaurants, The El Porton quasi-Mexican restaurants, and assorted small ventures like a mid-priced Italian restaurant (which is actually pretty good)
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Doc
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November 1st, 2011 at 11:15:11 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Actually, belive it or not, it is local.

¿Qué tan similar es a un Walmart en los Estados Unidos? ¿Son todos los productos importados de otros países?
Nareed
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November 1st, 2011 at 11:43:18 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

¿Qué tan similar es a un Walmart en los Estados Unidos? ¿Son todos los productos importados de otros países?



You know, I've never been to a Walmart in the States. I went to a Sam's Club back in the 90s, before we had any here, but that's it.

I've been to other stores, like Publix and others I don't recall the names of, but not Walmart. based on that, the products must be very different. I'd say 80% of all Walmart sells in their food section is local. Things like La Costeña sauces (Mexican and Italian), Herdez canned vegetables, Clemente Jacques Catsup, Barcel and Sabritas fried snacks (like chips, fritos, etc), luncheon meats from Fud, Zwan, Bafar, Capistrano and so on. Even some transnational brands, like Kellogg's Nabisco, Nestle, etc, have products meant for this market.

There are imports, sure, but you're as likely to see US products as Japanese and European ones. I wouldn't mind some more dairy imports, like non-fat yogurt that isn't plain, strawberry or prune, for example.

Oh, for a Spanish word I'll use, hmm, let me see.... ah! "¡que lata!" there!
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Nareed
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November 1st, 2011 at 12:03:05 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's word of the day shall be ceboruco, which is a volcano in Nayarit, and means a "rough rocky place."



I never heard it before.

Quote:

Los pasajeros de la Minnow no podrían quedado no había el barco estrellado al ceboruco. = The passengers of the Minnow would not have been stranded had the boat not crashed in the rocky place.



First, you said "The passengers of the Minnow woulnd't have been able to remain not had the boat crashed on the rocky place."

Next: "Los pasajeros deL Minnow no se habrían quedado varados si el barco no se hubiera estrellado CON el ceboruco."

I'll let you go on the boat's gender, as I know in the US, and other countries in the Anglosphere, all sea vessels are considered to be female (I think all space vessels, too). In Mexico either there's no consensus or it depends on the kind of vessel. "Barco" meaning a ship, is masculine; "lancha" meaning a small boat like a row boat or an outboard or a speed boat, is feminine. So you board EL barco and LA lancha.


Quote:

Second, I asked how to say "trick or treat" in Spanish. She said most would just say "trick or treat" in English. However, in Mexico, on día de los muertos sometimes children would say "dame una calavera." = "Give me a skull."



The expression used is "¿me da mi calaverita?" I don't know what it reffers to. Many kids carry around a hollow, palstic pumpkin, but the expression predates their use.

A tradition for el día de los muertos is to amke skull-shaped candy, either sugar candy, chocolate or amaranto con miel. I was hoping you'd cause Paco to find out why :) I know all about halloween, I lived it. But having been raised Jewish, I know next to nothing about what the goyim do on their holidays.

Quote:

Entonces, that must be why Nareed brought up the word. A Halloween reference, as opposed to anticipating discussion about Nayarit.



Indeed. Maybe November 1 and 2 are more significant in some parts of the country than in others, but all I know about Nayarit is that it's on the Pacific Ocean coast.
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pacomartin
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November 1st, 2011 at 12:12:14 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

Quote: Nareed

Actually, belive it or not, it is local.

¿Qué tan similar es a un Walmart en los Estados Unidos? ¿Son todos los productos importados de otros países?



There are two marinas in the bay. Marina Vallarta (1985-1993) is in the state of Jalisco, and Marina Nuevo Vallarta (late '90s) is in the state of Nayarit. The Marina's are only 4 miles apart and the airport is between them. The WALMART is next to the older marina of Puerto Vallarta.



The whole bay area was very lightly inhabited, and impossible to reach on some days by road. In 1954 Mexicana de Aviación airline inaugurated its flight Guadalajara - Puerto Vallarta to try and build a competitor to Acapulco. The flight from Los Angeles began in 1962. The movie crew with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton came in to shoot the Night of the Iguana, and released the movie in August 1964. I don't believe there was even a modern hotel at the time, and the crew spent a lot of time in the jungle.

When the couple bought a house there, recognition skyrocketed.



The shoreline belonging to the state of Nayarit remained undeveloped until the late 1990's



Jerónimo Arango (84 años) es uno de los seis hombres más ricos de México.
Él modeló su primera tienda en 1958 después de una tienda en Estados Unidos.
En 1991 se asoció con Wal-Mart imperio, y se vendieron en 1997.

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