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onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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April 21st, 2021 at 3:52:31 AM permalink
Whenever you see 150 point inspections listed in "certified pre-owned" cars, they're looking at a lot of things within a car to see if everything is fine at that point. Obviously something like cracked belts or leaking engines will be seen and indicate a problem down the road, so these cars with these problems wouldn't pass. Any kind of mechanic inspection is better than nothing, and yes nobody would know what would happen down the road on a car that passes, but the car which didn't pass the test would be what you would want to eliminate. Of course before an inspection, you're going to want the price negotiated first you're fine with or there is no point getting an inspection. With older cars, not everything needs to be perfect, because some things not working like air conditioning is already part of the ancient car price, though you might not expect to have all the brakes and struts fixed really soon though, things like that.
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MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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April 21st, 2021 at 10:02:55 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

. Mister V thanks this is still 1968 when a good mechanic could spend half an hour with a car and tell you exactly what's going on.



You don't know a lot about maintaining and repairing cars and trucks of various vintages, do you, EB?

Starting around the mid-1990's cars now have OBD (on board diagnostic) systems where anybody with the correct tool can scan the car's computer for codes showing faults: this is now the main starting point for troubleshooting problems, i.e. checking for codes.

Scanner's are cheap: I have one and use it for the only OBD equipped rig we own, a newer F-250 4X4.

So just by plugging it in to the car a potential owner who knows about cars (me) or his mechanic can instantly see what is going on and needs attention.

Most of the used cars people are likely to run acrooss are OBD equipped, if about 25 years old or newer.

Great stuff!

Also, just because a car is new does not mean it is trouble-free.

For example, a few years ago my son bought a brand new GMC pickup with automatic transmission: the transmission never worked right.

Took it to the dealer four times to fix it, without luck.

I successfully made a lemon law claim agains GMC and made them buy it back.

Buying a car, new or used, is always a gamble.
"What, me worry?"
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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April 21st, 2021 at 10:13:32 AM permalink
Test drive the car to an Auto-zone and they’ll lend you a scanner free. Other places may also do it.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
MrV
MrV
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April 21st, 2021 at 10:52:15 AM permalink
Or just buy one: they're inexpensive, and come with instructions.

Easy to use, once you leave your comfort zone.

You don't need to be a competent, shade tree mechanic to use one and understand the information it provides.

Bring one with you to check out any mid-90's and newer car you are thinking of buying, whether on a dealer's lot or with a private party, the seller has no grounds to object to you testing it.
"What, me worry?"
DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
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April 21st, 2021 at 10:58:27 AM permalink
Quote: MrV

Or just buy one: they're inexpensive, and come with instructions.

Easy to use, once you leave your comfort zone.

You don't need to be a competent, shade tree mechanic to use one and understand the information it provides.

Bring one with you to check out any mid-90's and newer car you are thinking of buying, whether on a dealer's lot or with a private party, the seller has no grounds to object to you testing it.



Mine is Bluetooth and has an app on my phone. I think I paid $17.
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EvenBob
EvenBob
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April 21st, 2021 at 11:56:21 AM permalink
Quote: MrV



Starting around the mid-1990's cars now have OBD (on board diagnostic)



Wow, no kidding. Good grief.. Too bad the things you really need to know when buying a high mileage older car, it doesn't tell you. You still have to flip a coin or make a guess because nobody knows what's going to happen 3 months from now. No matter what your cute little diagnostic toy tells you.. You act like you pay some mechanic a hundred bucks he goes over it it says to you, yep, go ahead and buy it. This car has three years left on it before anything major goes wrong. You're living in a dream world.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
MrV
MrV
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Thanks for this post from:
Hunterhill
April 21st, 2021 at 12:11:10 PM permalink
It's a good start, EB, and time and money well spent.

Codes will tell you a lot of info that a prospective purchaser might want to know: do you even understand anything about cars, EB?

Your comment to the effect that codes are of little real value when checking out a high mileage used car is, quite frankly, absurd and I can only assume is based upon a lack of first hand knowlede of cars, trucks, and how they work, specifically.

People like you make me laugh, saying "never buy a car with over 200K miles."

Baloney.

I'm about to sell one of our Volvos, it has well over 200K miles on it, is in great shape and will likely provide many more years of service if the new owner continues to maintain it as well as I have.

Like I said above, buying any car, new or used, is always a gamble.
"What, me worry?"
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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April 21st, 2021 at 2:54:43 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Wow, no kidding. Good grief.. Too bad the things you really need to know when buying a high mileage older car, it doesn't tell you. You still have to flip a coin or make a guess because nobody knows what's going to happen 3 months from now. No matter what your cute little diagnostic toy tells you.. You act like you pay some mechanic a hundred bucks he goes over it it says to you, yep, go ahead and buy it. This car has three years left on it before anything major goes wrong. You're living in a dream world.

A high mileage car is tapped out of almost all value, there isn't much risk if everything seems fine and there aren't many other things already wrong which are major nuisances. I'd bet you would be on your way with that minivan already if you hadn't balked.
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billryan
billryan 
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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April 21st, 2021 at 6:34:56 PM permalink
Find a mechanic you trust and let him find a car for you. More often than not, he'll have a customer looking to sell one and he knows all about it.
daveyandersen1
daveyandersen1
Joined: Mar 27, 2015
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April 21st, 2021 at 9:19:22 PM permalink
Thanks D RICH I should have noticed the miles before i signed the papers.. next time I'l lbe smarter

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