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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 21st, 2011 at 5:15:26 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

But I'm afraid you failed to identify the movie alluded to in my, admitedly, brief outline of a scene. Read it again and see if you can spot it.
I knew that, but thanks for the info.



Girls in white dresses with blue satin sashes
Snowflakes that stay on my nose and eye lashes
Silver white winters that melt into spring
These are a few of my favorite things!


You seem to know the gruesome details of English. Try this one: That t*** doesn't even know she's just using him.
Guess the three letters replaced by asterisks.
Nareed
Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 5:28:58 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Girls in white dresses with blue satin sashes



You didn't name the movie :P

I don't even like it that much, thought the photography is first rate, but I like that song. And the scene of the young nuns confessing sabotage to the elder nun :)

Now, truthfully, did you know or did you Google it?

Quote:

You seem to know the gruesome details of English.



Gruesome? "Skip" is gruesome?

Quote:

Try this one: That t*** doesn't even know she's just using him.



I'm guessing it's either "tWIT" or "t@&#." Honestly I can't think of anything else.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 21st, 2011 at 5:41:12 PM permalink
Nareed
Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 5:53:33 PM permalink
Twit, noun, an insignificant, silly, or bothersome person.

You may have been thinking of "tool," but "twit" fits in there just as well.

Besides, you Googled "The Sound of Music."

So there :P

But seriously, I woulnd't use the word "tool" in that sense. I don't know wheter my colloquial English is fixed somewhere in the late 80s to early 90s, or whether it's something else. If I wanted a word for someone who'd being used without being aware of it, I'd chose "patsy," perhaps, or "simpleton," or just plain, good, old-fashioned "moron."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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October 21st, 2011 at 7:29:54 PM permalink
I thought the word for rope was soga.

Also, I would say "jumping" rope, but "skipping" is almost interchangeable. I think at some point around the 70s "skipping" went out of style, in favor of "jumping."
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Nareed
Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 7:52:57 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the word for rope was soga.



That, too.

These days you hear it seldom. When you do is in expressions like "Se echó la soga al cuello," meaning, "he put the noose on his own neck." This refers to someone who takes an unwarranted and very big risk, or who messes up so badly he winds up hurting himself.

Another word for a thin rope is "cordel," more like "string" than rope, though. Like what you'd use on a package
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 22nd, 2011 at 1:12:01 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the word for rope was soga.

Also, I would say "jumping" rope, but "skipping" is almost interchangeable. I think at some point around the 70s "skipping" went out of style, in favor of "jumping."



The product is sold both ways. The more traditional rope sold in the UK is "skipping rope" and cheap Chinese rope is called "jump rope".


Actually I did recognize the Sound of Music song as I was age 8 when the movie was released, so it was one of my first movies. It was one of the most popular movies of all time. I did google the exact lyrics however.


Rope, cable, line, string, and twine. Cable is both for electronics, and for steel wire. For the plastic stuff people often say "poly-pro" since it is made from Polypropylene.

Wizard
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Wizard
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October 22nd, 2011 at 7:57:26 AM permalink
Fecha: 22 de Octubre, 2011
Estado: Colima
Palabra: Astilla




Colima is a small state along the Pacific coast. For those readers who remember my "friendly bet dispute" thread, the woman I had the dispute with goes to Manzanillo (little apple tree) every year for Christmas, which is in Colima. She always invites me and my family, but my wife will no nowhere in Mexico.

There are lots of mountains in Colima (even the license plate has pictures of them), giving me lots of ideas for the word of the day. Such as:

Los Juanillos = ?
El Ocote = a specific kind of pine tree
El Peón = pion (unskilled laborer)
El Barrigón = somebody with a fat belly
La Media Luna = Crescent/Croissant
El Espinazo del Diablo = Spine of the Devil
El Escorpión (obvious)
El Tigre = Tiger
El Aguacate = Avacado
El Centinela = Sentry
El Tora = Bull
La Vaca = Cow

However, I think I'm going to go with Astilla = splinter.

Ejemplo time.

El león le dijo, "Por favor tome la astilla de la pata." = The lion said, "Please take the splinter out of my paw."

Note that I didn't say "mi pata," because body parts are never possesive in Spanish. See, at least I know something about the language :-)!
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 22nd, 2011 at 11:44:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

There are lots of mountains in Colima (even the license plate has pictures of them), giving me lots of ideas for the word of the day.



A phrase you didn't mention is Eje Volcánico Transversal also known as the Transvolcanic Belt and locally as the Sierra Nevada (Snowy Mountain Range), is a volcanic belt that extends 900 km from west to east across central-southern Mexico.

The Colima Volcano is on the state border with Jalisco (50 miles inland from the Pacific) and has erupted over 40 times in the last 436 years. This fact will make your wife even less interested in visiting Manzanillo. Manzanillo was a very chic vacation spot in the 1970's for Americans (i.e. the movie 10 with Dudley Moore and Bo Derek), but has become more popular as a domestic resort in recent years.


Colima Volcano is about 90 miles from the famous "Volcán de Parícutin" which we discussed earlier, that grew from a farmer's field in 1943.

Manzanillo is the most important shipping port in Pacific Mexico and it has good rail lines extending into Texas. It handles overflow from Los Angeles port and is an alternative to going through the Panama Canal.
Nareed
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October 22nd, 2011 at 11:54:46 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Colima is a small state along the Pacific coast.



It's so small and insignificant, the locals half the time don't remember they live there :)

Quote:

El león le dijo, "Por favor tome la astilla de la pata." = The lion said, "Please take the splinter out of my paw."

Note that I didn't say "mi pata," because body parts are never possesive in Spanish. See, at least I know something about the language :-)!



Where did you learn that?

But first things first. The lion would say "Por favor SACA la astilla de MI pata."

Tomar does mean take, but not take out. Sacar means to take out something that is within or inside something else. It means other things, too. Which reminds me, here's a much better free online Spanish-English dictionary than the one you've been using:

Merriam Webster

Click on the Spanish-English button on top of the search box.

Anyway, in Spanish you can refer possessively to your own body parts. You don't have to, but you can. example:

Me duele el codo = My elbow hurts
Me lastimé mi mano = I hurt my hand.

There may be some nonsensical, outdated rule on that, like in English you're not supposed to end a sentence on a preposition, but, really, I've never heard of it.
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