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Nareed
Nareed
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October 18th, 2011 at 6:34:24 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, for lack of a better idea, today's word of the day is culebra = snake. Not to be confused with serpiente. A question for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast the two words for snake.



You missed "víbora," which is the most common word for "snake."

As to the difference between them, I've no idea what it is. I think "culebra" refers to some particualr kind of snake, but I'm not sure nor know which one.

Quote:

Finally, is it just me or would anyone else have a terrible time pronouncing the names of these major cities and ruin sites in Campeche: Dzitbalché, Hecelchakán, Dzibilnocac, Edzná, Hocchob, Holactún, Uxul, Xicalango, Xpuhil, and Xtampak. Talk about a lot of Scrabble points.



I thought there was nothing in Campeche but Ciudad del Carmen and some ruins and beaches. The anmes you bring up are Mayan in origins. The Maya had a peculiar sense of pronunciation. They're also been credited with using and inventing the numeral zero, but that's not really so. Anyway that's your area of expertise.

Quote:

Mi serpiente tiene hambre, entonces que voy a alimentarlo un ratón. = My snake is hungry, so I'm going to feed it a mouse.



You're having a real tough time with the word "que"

"Mi CULEBRA [no use setting it up as WOTD and then not using it] tiene hambre, entonces LE voy a DAR DE COMER un ratón." Or "...LA voy a alimentar CON un ratón."

In the frist instance "le" refers to you. In the second "la" refers to the snake."
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Nareed
Nareed
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October 18th, 2011 at 12:49:34 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Campeche was, of course, the center of piracy in Mexico for hundreds of years.



And today that distinction probably belongs to Tepito, somewhere within Mexico City.
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Alan
Alan
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October 18th, 2011 at 1:00:10 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

And today that distinction probably belongs to Tepito, somewhere within Mexico City.



More probably like Somalia.
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 18th, 2011 at 8:56:19 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You're having a real tough time with the word "que"



Indeed. That is a difficult preposition. It often seems to just hold sentences together, without really meaning anything.

Quote: Nareed

"Mi CULEBRA [no use setting it up as WOTD and then not using it] tiene hambre, entonces LE voy a DAR DE COMER un ratón." Or "...LA voy a alimentar CON un ratón."

In the frist instance "le" refers to you. In the second "la" refers to the snake."



Why does "le" refer to me? I thought the "voy" already established I was talking about myself. If I must add a pronoun, why wouldn't it be "me"?
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Nareed
Nareed
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October 18th, 2011 at 9:13:28 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Indeed. That is a difficult preposition. It often seems to just hold sentences together, without really meaning anything.



It means "that."

Quote:

Why does "le" refer to me? I thought the "voy" already established I was talking about myself. If I must add a pronoun, why wouldn't it be "me"?



You ask this late? Right now I'm not even sure what I said is right... Sorry. Between interruptions at work and 12 hour workdays, some small mistakes are bound to creep in.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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October 18th, 2011 at 9:46:12 PM permalink
Fecha: 19 de Octubre, 2011
Estado: Chiapas
Palabra: Chicle




Today's estado is Chiapas, an isolated state on the southern border and Mexico's poorest. Nevertheless, it has lots of natural resources. Among the many trees found there is the chicle, which is used for making chewing gum. The word chicle also refers to chewing gum itself.

Ejemplo time

No mastican chicle en mi clase y no lo ponen debajo de las mesas. = Don't chew gum in my class and don't put it under the desks.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 19th, 2011 at 2:01:18 AM permalink
In Chiapas is one of the greatest sets of ruins in the Western world, Palenque, the giant ancient city in the mountains of Chiapas abandoned in the 9th century. While it is in the political state of Chiapas, it is physically located on the northern side of the mountains and is more easily gotten to from a city in Tabasco like Villahermosa (which does not mean "fat city").





For the truly adventurous is the Mayan ruins you can only get to by boat. Yaxchilan (also sometimes historically referred to by the names Menché and City Lorillard) is an ancient city located on the bank of the Usumacinta River. In the Late Classic Period Yaxchilan was one of the most powerful Maya states along the course of the Usumacinta, with Piedras Negras as its major rival.

Although you used to have to go over 100 miles by boat to get to Yaxchilan, in recent years the Mexican government has built a road to patrol the increasingly nasty border with Guatemala. You can now drive to the small town of Frontera Corozal , where you can take a boat ride of less than 45 minutes to the ruins. Hiking is essentially impossible, and would be extremely dangerous.

Wizard
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Wizard
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October 19th, 2011 at 5:20:11 AM permalink
If my Spanish isn't improving, at least I'm learning some good trivia about Mexico.

Here is a off topic question. Can caer be used to mean "like." In particular, how would you translate this:

A Rachel le caía bien Howard. This is supposed to be a translation of "Rachel liked Howard," but I've never seen caer used in that way.
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Alan
Alan
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October 19th, 2011 at 5:30:53 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

If my Spanish isn't improving, at least I'm learning some good trivia about Mexico.

Here is a off topic question. Can caer be used to mean "like." In particular, how would you translate this:

A Rachel le caía bien Howard. This is supposed to be a translation of "Rachel liked Howard," but I've never seen caer used in that way.



My expert says yes. Apparently caer is a personal thing as you used in your context, as opposed to a car is like(caer) a truck(comparing similarities).

We'll see what Paco and Nareed have to say about it.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 19th, 2011 at 6:12:24 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

If my Spanish isn't improving, at least I'm learning some good trivia about Mexico.

Here is a off topic question. Can caer be used to mean "like." In particular, how would you translate this:

A Rachel le caía bien Howard. This is supposed to be a translation of "Rachel liked Howard," but I've never seen caer used in that way.



It is possible to use caer to mean "to like" or "to fall for" (it's a phrasal verb in English-because without the preposition for you would not understand that particular meaning).

As Nareed pointed out, in Spanish you would not used the past tense like you do in English. It is vague in English if Rachel still likes Howard in the present, but in Spanish you know for certain she no longer likes him. Use the present tense if you want to indicate that she still likes him. If she no longer likes him, then indicate so with overtly with another clause: "Rachel liked Howard, until he puked on her".

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