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Nareed
Nareed
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October 14th, 2011 at 12:52:02 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Most Argentines are very proud of the Spanish they speak, and consider it higher quality than many of the other dialects.



They're entitled to their delucions.

They're also not what you'd call well-liked in other Latin american countries. Here's the least offensive Argentine joke I know:

Q: Why do Argentinians look up and smile during thunderstorms?
A: They think God is taking their picture.

I think I've posted some of these before.

I had a number of Argentinian teachers in junior high school. The Jewish community in Argentina is the largest in this hemisphere next to America's, and the largest in any Spanish speaking country, or so I've been told. Anwyay, their accent is far removed from most Mexican accents, and their language usage is both odd and obscure.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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October 14th, 2011 at 1:49:59 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Anwyay, their accent is far removed from most Mexican accents, and their language usage is both odd and obscure.



According to her, the rest of the Spanish-speaking world loves Argentine accents. In the same way my life likes it when Switch leaves a message (in his English accent) on my home answering machine.
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Nareed
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October 14th, 2011 at 2:07:14 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

According to her, the rest of the Spanish-speaking world loves Argentine accents.



Didn't I just say they're entiteld to their delusions?

In fact, I said their accent is too far removed from Meican accents. I did not say whether I find it pleasing, or more grating on the nerves than a dentist's drill accompanied by nails scraping on a chalkboard. (I'll let you guess this exciting mystery).

I assume that like all large countries, accetns vary in Argentina. But all Argentines I've met had very simialr accents.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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October 14th, 2011 at 10:22:31 PM permalink
I'm sure my tutor will be happy to know both you guys ruled in her favor.

For the next 32 entries I would like to look at the 31 states of Mexico, plus the Districto Federal. Let's go in alphabetical order.

Fecha: 15 de Octobre, 2011
Estado: Aguascalientes
Palabra: Terma




It would be too easy to say that Aguascalientes means hot waters. Why it is one word, I'd like to know. If I wish to say "How do I turn on the hot water?" Would I use one word or two for the "hot water" part?

What might you find in a place called Aguacalientes? Hot springs of course. While English does not have a single word for hot springs, Spanish does, terma.

A question for the members from Mexico (i.e. Nareed), do people get naked and smoke mota in natural hot springs in Mexico, as us Gringos tend to do?

Ejempo time

Este terma esta linda, pero tiene demasiado muchos gentes. = This hot spring is nice, but is too crowded.
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pacomartin
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October 15th, 2011 at 1:29:25 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I assume that like all large countries, accents vary in Argentina. But all Argentines I've met had very similar accents.



Of course there are regional variants, but most citizens, and certainly most of them that travel are going to be from near Buenos Aires.
pacomartin
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October 15th, 2011 at 1:55:03 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 15 de Octobre, 2011 Estado: Aguascalientes



The original name of the city was Villa de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción de las Aguas Calientes with two words. It is a reasonably affluent small state of about a million people. The state has reasonable air connections to Dallas, Houston, and LA (plus DF and Tijuana in Mexico). I've stopped there briefly on my way to Zacatecas, but it is not known as tourist destination.

Nareed
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October 15th, 2011 at 4:57:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm sure my tutor will be happy to know both you guys ruled in her favor.



Sort of :)

Quote:

It would be too easy to say that Aguascalientes means hot waters.



That's just what it means.

Quote:

Why it is one word, I'd like to know.



My Spanish teacher used to stress that for names there are no rules.

Quote:

If I wish to say "How do I turn on the hot water?" Would I use one word or two for the "hot water" part?



"¿Como prendo el agua caliente?" But that's unusual. In Spanish you don't really "turn on" the water, you "open the hot water faucet." So you'd point to the shower and ask "¿Cual es la caliente?" Meaning which of the two wheels turns on the hot water. If they can't see you pointing, you ask "¿Cual es la llave del agua caliente?"

Quote:

What might you find in a place called Aguacalientes? Hot springs of course. While English does not have a single word for hot springs, Spanish does, terma.



If you say so. the dictionary has it as a distantly related term to "baños." Remind me next Monday to ask around the office.

Quote:

A question for the members from Mexico (i.e. Nareed), do people get naked and smoke mota in natural hot springs in Mexico, as us Gringos tend to do?



Sorry, I've never been near a hot spring.

Quote:

Este terma esta linda, pero tiene demasiado muchos gentes. = This hot spring is nice, but is too crowded.



EstA terma ES linda, pero HAY demasiada gente."

There's a subtle distinction here. Saying "hay demasiada gente" means "there are too many people." Saying "Hay mucha gente" means "It's too crowded." The way you said it, more or less means "There are too many much people."

Another subtle distinction is "gente" = "people" while "gentes" = "peoples"


"Nice" is a problematic word to use in Spanish. It translates as "agradable," but that word is seldom used. A Mexican wanting to say a "terma" is nice, would say "esta terma está bien." "Linda" means cute, though it can also be used to say pretty when applied to a person, or beautiful when applied to a place. So in that sense your example was right.
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pacomartin
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October 15th, 2011 at 7:01:24 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the members from Mexico (i.e. Nareed), do people get naked and smoke mota in natural hot springs in Mexico, as us Gringos tend to do?



The impression I always got was the public displays of nudity are very rare among Mexicans. Although you can find about a dozen resorts ranging from upscale to hippie, the majority of people there are foreign. Some of the beaches on the Pacific coast cater to a lot of Europeans, many of whom are used to nude swimming.

I am not sure about smoking mota. It is certainly not alien, but once again it seemed more common in California or in Colorado. That is entirely subjective on my part, and I don't know if there are reliable statistics. Certainly the Mexican government says there would be no drug cartels if they had to depend on the Mexican market.

I have read articles by the woman who runs this website: Mexico's Drug War: An ongoing analysis of southwest border violence issues by an experienced intelligence professional. which claims drug use is increasingly rapidly in Mexico, but is still insignificant compared to the American market.
Wizard
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October 15th, 2011 at 7:42:49 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Certainly the Mexican government says there would be no drug cartels if they had to depend on the Mexican market.



Correct me if I'm wrong but I thought that former president Fox favored legalizing drugs, or at least decriminalizing them. Why did the public not enthusiastically support that idea? Seems to me that would eliminate most of the crime problem overnight. By taxing and regulating narcotics the tax revenues could have been enormous, not to mention the savings from the reduced crime. It seems to be the pros would easily outweigh any cons.

What am I missing?
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pacomartin
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October 15th, 2011 at 7:44:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Regarding Paco's question, this is probably wrong, but in English we use a preposition after said words, and it is omitted in Spanish. However, I doubt that answer, because Spanish often implies a preposition where one is directly stated in English. I doubt it is limited to those words.



Spanish verbs that have inherent prepositions are not limited to those 11 examples, but I believe the complete list is still rather short. I think the following three dozen verbs is fairly comprehensive. I thought it would be a good cheat sheet for you to have in trying to create translations.

Prepositions are always a problem, because in other cases you tend to use the incorrect one. I know por and para are very problematic for me because they often translate to the same word, "for", in English.

# Infinitive English Translation
1 agradecer to thank for
2 apagar to turn off
3 aprovechar to take advantage of
4 arrancar to turn on
5 atravesar to go across
6 averiguar to find out
7 bajar to go down
8 botar to throw out
9 buscar to look for
10 caerse to fall down
11 colgar (ue) to hang up
12 conocer to be acquainted with
13 cortar to cut off; to cut
14 criar to bring up; to raise
15 destacar to stand out
16 encender (ie) to turn on
17 entregar to hand over
18 envolver (ue) to wrap up
19 escuchar to listen to
20 guardar cama to stay in bed
21 huir to flee from
22 ignorar to be unaware of
23 indicar to point out
24 llevar to take away
25 lograr to succeed in
26 mirar to look at
27 pagar to pay for
28 pedir to ask for
29 platicar to talk over; to chat
30 poner to turn on; to put; to place
31 quitarse to take off
32 recogar (ue) to pick up
33 saber to know how to ; to know
34 soler+inf. to be in the habit of + INFINITIVE
35 subir to go up
36 yacer to lie down

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