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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 6th, 2011 at 11:32:59 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

This makes me wonder if the English word rodeo is actually a Spanish word. At a rodeo the center is circular with the crowd surrounding it. Or maybe it is because the cowboy is trying to surround the calf to throw the rope around its neck. Maybe the rope itself is what the word rodeo refers to. Paco, this has your name written all over it.



rodeo first recorded in 1914 as public entertainment show of horse-riding skill.

The word was first recorded in 1834 to mean "cattle round-up". This meaning was taken from Spanish rodear.

It is a lot like stampede which is an Anglicization of estampida. Obviously most of our words come from Latin usually filtered through the Norman language since that has been going on for over 950 years. However, here is a short list mostly associated with the Old West. Most are obviously of Spanish origin, but some words like tuna are not immediately seen as being Spanish words.

armadillo (literally, "the little armed one")
bronco (means "wild" or "rough" in Spanish)
buckaroo (possibly from vaquero, "cowboy")
bunco (probably from banco, "bank")
burrito (literally "little donkey")
burro
chaps (from Mexican Spanish chaparreras)
chihuahua (dog breed named after Mexican city and state)
chile relleno (Mexican food)
chili (from chile, derived from Nahuatl chilli)
chili con carne (con carne means "with meat")
chocolate (originally xocolatl, from Nahuatl, an indigenous Mexican language)
churro (Mexican food)
cigar, cigarette (from cigarro)
cinch (from cincho, "belt")
derecho (a type of windstorm that can be found in the U.S. Midwest)
desperado
enchilada (participle of enchilar, "to season with chili")
fajita (diminutive of faja, a belt or sash, probably so named due to strips of meat)
flauta (a fried, rolled tortilla)
garbanzo (type of bean)
guacamole (originally from Nahuatl ahuacam, "avocado," and molli, "sauce")
guerrilla (In Spanish, the word refers to a small fighting force. A guerrilla fighter is a guerrillero.)
habanero (a type of pepper; in Spanish, the word refers to something from Havana)
hacienda (in Spanish, the initial h is silent)
huarache (type of sandal)
hoosegow (slang term for a jail comes from Spanish juzgado, participle of juzgar, "to judge")
jerky (the word for dried meet comes from charqui, which in turn came from the Quechua ch'arki)
jicama (originally from Nahuatl)
key (the word for a small island comes from the Spanish cayo, possibly of Caribbean origin)
lariat (from la reata, "the lasso")
mulatto (from mulato)
mustang (from mestengo, "stray")
negro (comes from either the Spanish or Portuguese word for the color black)
palomino (originally meant a white dove in Spanish)
patio (In Spanish, the word most often refers to a courtyard.)
peso (Although in Spanish a peso is also a monetary unit, it more generally means a weight.)
peyote (originally Nahuatl peyotl)
picaresque (from picaresco)
pickaninny (offensive term, from pequeño, "small")
pimento (Spanish pimiento)
pinole (a meal made of grain and beans; originally Nahuatl pinolli)
pinto (Spanish for "spotted" or "painted")
piña colada (literally meaning "strained pineapple")
plantain (from plátano or plántano)
plaza
poncho (Spanish adopted the word from Araucanian, an indigenous South American language)
potato (from batata, a word of Caribbean origin)
pronto (from an adjective or adverb meaning "quick" or "quickly"
pueblo (in Spanish, the word can mean simply "people")
quadroon (from cuaterón)
quesadilla
quirt (type of riding whip, comes from Spanish cuarta)
ranch (Rancho often means "ranch" in Mexican Spanish, but it can also mean a settlement, camp or meal rations.)
reefer (drug slang, possibly from Mexican Spanish grifa, "marijuana")
renegade (from renegado)
rodeo
rumba (from rumbo, originally referring to the course of a ship and, by extension, the revelry aboard)
salsa (In Spanish, almost any kind of a sauce or gravy can be referred to as salsa.)
sarsaparilla (from zarza, "bramble," and parilla, "small vine")
sassafras (from sasafrás)
savanna (from obsolete Spanish çavana, originally Taino zabana, "grassland")
savvy (from sabe, a form of the verb saber, "to know")
serape (Mexican blanket)
serrano (type of pepper)
shack (possibly from Mexican Spanish jacal, from the Nahuatl xcalli, "adobe hut")
siesta
sombrero (In Spanish, the word, which is derived from sombra, "shade," can mean almost any kind of hat, not just the traditional broad-rimmed Mexican hat.)
spaniel (ultimately from hispania, the same root that gave us the words "Spain" and español)
stampede (from estampida)
stevedore (from estibador, one who stows or packs things)
stockade (from a French derivation of the Spanish estacada, "fence" or "stockade")
tuna (from atún)
vamoose (from vamos, a form of "to go")
vanilla (from vainilla)
vaquero (English regionalism for a cowboy)
vicuña (animal similar to a llama, from Quechua wikuña)
vigilante (from adjective for "vigilant")
Doc
Doc
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October 7th, 2011 at 6:12:40 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

rodeo first recorded in 1914 as public entertainment show of horse-riding skill.

The word was first recorded in 1834 to mean "cattle round-up". This meaning was taken from Spanish rodear.

I once attended a charreada (did I spell that correctly?) in San Antonio. Very similar to what I would consider a conventional rodeo, but more emphasis on riding skills and riding pageantry. So if American English picked up "rodeo" from Mexican Spanish, how did we miss out on "charreada"?
Nareed
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October 7th, 2011 at 6:59:17 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

La viuda vieja está rodeada de gatos. = The old widow is surrounded by cats.

I'm not sure about the rodeada.



be sure. It's the right usage and the right word. A+

Quote:

I could easily be wrong about the de. Por crosses my mind too.



You could have used "por." But "de" also applies in this case. if there is a difference, it's a minor and technical one.

BTW another example:

"Tenemos la casa rodeada" = "We have the house surrounded" I've noticed in cop shows they always say "the place" whether they've surrounded an office building, a house or anything else. In spanish people would tend to be more specific.

Also, since you mention "rodeo" as a detour, that's half right. One might say "tuve que rodear la calle cerrada" = "I had to go around the closed street," which indicates a detour. But a formal detour such as the ones you find when streets are being repaired, is called "Desviación." And that is also the word for "Deviation."
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 7th, 2011 at 7:49:06 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

I once attended a charreada (did I spell that correctly?) in San Antonio. Very similar to what I would consider a conventional rodeo, but more emphasis on riding skills and riding pageantry. So if American English picked up "rodeo" from Mexican Spanish, how did we miss out on "charreada"?



The charreada or charrería is as old as the conquest of Mexico in 1520. It would seem that the word was never anglicized. I would imagine since originally Americans would have concentrated on rodeo skills. If the word has not changed it's spelling by even a single letter or it's pronunciation, I would consider it still a Spanish word, even if it is commonly used in Northern America.

Rodeo is loanword because English speakers use it exclusively as a noun. It is not normally translated, but if you did it would probably be "round up". The Spanish verb rodear meaning "to turn around" has a conjugation rodeo which means "I turn around". So even though there is a Spanish word with the exact same spelling and the same history, the Spanish word is a verb.

Charreada in it's current form developed after the Mexican Revolution when charro traditions were disappearing. I saw this in Oaxaca as well. The Guelaguetza, or Los lunes del cerro (Mondays on the Hill) is an annual indigenous cultural event in Mexico that takes place in the city of Oaxaca, capital of the state of Oaxaca, as well as in nearby villages. It was originally a pagan festival involving the sacrifice of a virgin and the taking of psychotropic mushrooms. After the conquest, as was very common, it was reorganized as celebration of the Virgin del Carmen. They had a devastating earthquake in Oaxaca City in the 1920's, and as a morale booster, it became more or less a well organized display of the dance and singing from all the indigenous cultures in the state.

The Guelaguetza eventually required the building of a stadium in the 1970's to prevent damage to the hill and to make it much safer for spectators. When a divided highway was built in 1994 and improvements made to the airport, the Valley began to attract weekend tourists from Mexico City, and international visitors (more from Europe than the USA). The Guelaguetza ended up becoming a major money making tourist attraction, and hence a focus of tensions and riots between the angry disaffected and the businessmen who they felt were making a profit on their traditions.

Nareed
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October 7th, 2011 at 8:25:41 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The Guelaguetza ended up becoming a major money making tourist attraction, and hence a focus of tensions and riots between the angry disaffected and the businessmen who they felt were making a profit on their traditions.



That has more to do with left wing parties and whatever the PRI is these days using the poor in a violent area for their own purposes. The teachers unions there spend more time in protests than teaching.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 8th, 2011 at 4:13:14 AM permalink
Minor word of the day
Jamón ibérico

The phrase means Iberian Ham which sells for roughly US$100 per pound. Ibera refers to the peninsula containing Spain and Portugal.


It is fantastic ham, much better than it's poorer cousin, Italian prosciutto, which can usually be bought for less then $20 per pound.

At the Madrid Masters, Scotland's Elliot Saltman has won his weight (237 pounds) in ham for acing the par-3 third in the second round on Friday. The media is having a good time with this prize, but failing to mention that it is a gift worth well over $20,000 .

Nareed
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October 8th, 2011 at 5:14:23 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Minor word of the day
Jamón ibérico



I thought it was called Jamon Serrano.

Quote:

Ibera refers to the peninsula containing Spain and Portugal.



That would be IberIa. It's also the name of Spain's major airline.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 8th, 2011 at 6:17:28 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I thought it was called Jamon Serrano.
That would be IberIa. It's also the name of Spain's major airline.



Jamon Serrano is typically about $18 / pound (bone in) and is an expensive but still more common than IberIco.




Jamon IberIco is typically about $60 / pound (bone in) and closer to $100 per pound boneless.

This leg of Jamon IberIco was advertised at Selfridge's department store in London at 7 kg for £1,800 (that is over $180 / pound and includes the leg bone).

I did mistype the word.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 8th, 2011 at 6:21:54 AM permalink
The most expensive hams from VA I have seen are usually 11-14 pounds for $169.
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 8th, 2011 at 7:56:37 AM permalink
Ejemplo time.

No voy a comerlos, Sam Soy Yo. No me gustan huevos verdes y jamón Ibérico. = I will not eat them, Sam I Am. I do not like green eggs and Iberian ham.

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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