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Curious55
Curious55
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September 30th, 2011 at 9:56:28 AM permalink
Max is short for Maxim
Maxim is short for Maximillion.
Would Maximillion be short for Maxibillion ? :)
Wizard
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September 30th, 2011 at 2:37:15 PM permalink
It would seem from Nareed's post above there is a disconnect between the dictionary and actual usage. Suspiro.

To change the topic, here is an auction for a 32-state set of Mexico license plates I'm keeping my eye on. At that time, mid 70s, Mexican license plates were made of a pretty poor quality metal and paint, so this is an impressive set. If I tried to do this plate by plate it would take ages and cost a LOT of money. The down side is the whole set doesn't look visually appealing. Most of the plates pretty much look the same. Where is the color Mexico is known for?

Also, I thought Mexico had 32 states plus the DF (Federal District). This is set of 32 includes the DF, so either a state is missing, or my count is wrong. Nareed, do you notice any missing?
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pacomartin
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September 30th, 2011 at 3:34:13 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Also, I thought Mexico had 32 states plus the DF (Federal District). This is set of 32 includes the DF, so either a state is missing, or my count is wrong. Nareed, do you notice any missing?



Your count is wrong, there are 31 states + DF. As Baja California Sur (BCS) and Quintana Roo (QRO) did not become states until the mid 1970's, I suspect they were still territories when these plates were issued. Under the Mexican constitution, a territory must have a population of over 100K before it qualifies for statehood.


A curiosity is the the state encompassing Tijuana and Mexicali is "Baja Calfornia", and not "Baja California Norte" as you would expect. It seems as if in the 1950's when BC qualified for statehood, they did not think about what they would call the southern part of the peninsula when it qualified for statehood. Baja, as most people know, means "Lower" since "Alta California" is the present state of California in the USA that we took as spoils from this country's most profitable war.
Nareed
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September 30th, 2011 at 4:15:17 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It would seem from Nareed's post above there is a disconnect between the dictionary and actual usage. Suspiro.



I can't say this enough: you need to see and hear how language is used.

Also, the word "asistir" when meaning "to attend" has a bit of a compulsory connotation. Not entirely and not in every sense, but it's there.

Quote:

To change the topic, here is an auction for a 32-state set of Mexico license plates I'm keeping my eye on.



Good luck getting it. if there's a "buy now" option, you should take it, assuming the price is acceptable.

Quote:

At that time, mid 70s, Mexican license plates were made of a pretty poor quality metal and paint, so this is an impressive set.



They only needed to last for 24 months max. Motorists were required to exchange plates every two years. Now we have "permanent" plates, allegedly, but in Mex City there have been three "permanent" sets already.

Quote:

If I tried to do this plate by plate it would take ages and cost a LOT of money. The down side is the whole set doesn't look visually appealing. Most of the plates pretty much look the same. Where is the color Mexico is known for?



The colors changed every two years. Most plates are of the same year, ergo of the same color. But you may have noticed there are two plates from 1968 with the Olympic logo o them. That's the year Mex City hosted the Summer Games.

Most of the new "permanent" plates have the colors or decoration peculiar to each state. The first set were all green on white all over the country. Starting with the second they were individualized by state. Mex City's first set featured the angel atop Independence Column, which is also the logo of a daily newspaper.

Quote:

Also, I thought Mexico had 32 states plus the DF (Federal District). This is set of 32 includes the DF, so either a state is missing, or my count is wrong. Nareed, do you notice any missing?



They're all there. 31 states plus the Federal District. See the reply to Paco's post below.
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pacomartin
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September 30th, 2011 at 4:27:26 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's word is yet another false cognate/friend. You would think asistir would mean to assist. Actually, it means to be present or to accompany. I'd be interested to know if the roots of both the English assist and the Spanish asistir.



I would say that they are false friends, but not false cognates since the English, Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese words all come from the same Latin word. However, most websites disagree with me, and list it as both a false friend and a false cognate (they make no distinction between the phrases).

In English to assist it is synonymous to help where the word "help" is of Anglo Saxon origin. In all the other languages it's primary meaning is to attend although in Portuguese it sometimes means "to watch".

The Latin word assistere means to take a position. or to stand. Which is a slightly different meaning than any of the modern usages.

An archaic meaning in English was: "To stand (at a place) or to (an opinion), to attend a theatrical performance." which is much closer to the present day Romance languages interpretation of the word.

EDIT: Nareed says there is a slightly "mandatory requirement" in the translation "to attend". That would make sense, since the Latin word implies that you are a representative of a greater power and you are an assistant.
Nareed
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September 30th, 2011 at 4:38:06 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Your count is wrong, there are 31 states + DF. As Baja California Sur (BCS) and Quintana Roo (QRO) did not become states until the mid 1970's, I suspect they were still territories when these plates were issued.



They both became states in 1974, BCS a few months earlier. The set has some plates from 68, one from Baja Sur, as a matter of fact. But at the time regulations for plates were nation-wide, so I guess territories were issued the same kinds of plates as states.

BTW, the abbreviation for Quintana Roo is QR. QRO is the abbreviation for Queretaro.

So yes, there are 31 states and the DF. There are periodic suggestions to confer statehood on the Federal District. It would be nice if they did. As things stand, the Federal District, which is the core of Mexico City, has self-rule, it elects a mayor and legislature, but the president can override its laws or practices and even the appointments of officials if he so chooses. Since President Zedillo in the mid-90s, though, no president has done so. but the ability remains and that could escalate in a partisan political war.
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Wizard
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September 30th, 2011 at 9:12:52 PM permalink
Thank you for all the help with Mexican geography and placas.


Fecha: 1 de Octobre, 2011
Palabra: PASEAR


Today word is yet another way to say walk in Spanish. It is not to be confused with caminar or andar, which also mean walk. It seems to me that caminar is the most frequently used of the three. I frankly don't know what is the distinction between these three words for walk, but am all ears to learn.

Ejemplo time

Me gusta pasear por la playa. = I like to walk on the beach.

Neccesito pasear mi perro. = I need to walk my dog.
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Nareed
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September 30th, 2011 at 10:18:21 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thank you for all the help with Mexican geography and placas.



My pleasure

Quote:


Fecha: 1 de Octobre, 2011
Palabra: PASEAR


Today word is yet another way to say walk in Spanish. It is not to be confused with caminar or andar, which also mean walk. It seems to me that caminar is the most frequently used of the three. I frankly don't know what is the distinction between these three words for walk, but am all ears to learn.



Pasear actually means to stroll, and more important to move around or to go somewhere for enjoyment. You do ahve a knack for tough words.


Quote:

Me gusta pasear por la playa. = I like to walk on the beach.



That's a bad choice, as people do walk on the beach and not, for some reason, stroll there.

Quote:

Neccesito pasear mi perro. = I need to walk my dog.



That's actually a god one, both ways.

Take this example:

"Me gusta pasear por el centro comercial" = "I like to stroll through the mall."

It's perfectly straightforward

But consider this one:

"Fuimos a Las Vegas a pasear."

I can't translate the phrase simply. What it means is we spent a vacation in Vegas enjoying ourselves, but there's no simple translation. The closest would be "We went to Las Vegas on a holiday."

The phrase "pasear al perro," implies you take the dog out for a walk because the dog enjoys it. If you've ever owned a dog you know he'd rather go on a walk than do anything else except eat.
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Curious55
Curious55
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September 30th, 2011 at 11:09:56 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed


"Fuimos a Las Vegas a pasear."
The closest would be "We went to Las Vegas on a holiday."


Imho, "We went to Las Vegas on a holiday." would be "Fuimos a Las Vegas de vacaciones".

Paseando entiende algun movimiento (caminando, manejando, navegando etc...)
If you stayed in your hotel in Las Vegas ...no fue a pasear.

So "Fuimos a Las Vegas a pasear" is rather "We went and strolled in Las Vegas" or "We went to LV and strolled the Strip" for example.
Nareed
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October 1st, 2011 at 6:00:49 AM permalink
Quote: Curious55

Imho, "We went to Las Vegas on a holiday." would be "Fuimos a Las Vegas de vacaciones".



Yes, if you're translating from English to Spanish.

Quote:

Paseando entiende algun movimiento (caminando, manejando, navegando etc...)



Not necessarily. That's why I said pasear also means to go somewhere to do something enjoyable.

It may also mean to take something along for no purpose. Say you make a rather long trip to buy something and deliver some documents. You do buy what you needed, but cant deliver the documents for some reason. You might say "Llevé los papeles a pasear."
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