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WongBo
WongBo
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September 27th, 2012 at 12:26:07 PM permalink
You were close, paco.
It is on the western shore of Africa.
Which I think you meant as you did mention the indentation.
Hint: the indentation is called the Gulf of Guinea
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 27th, 2012 at 1:10:26 PM permalink
Quote: WongBo

Hint: the indentation is called the Gulf of Guinea



That's a pretty big hint. I looked up the history in Wikipedia to see how the Spanish got there. I see that it was almost 300 years after the famous Treaty of Tordesillas divided the entire world between the Spanish and the Portuguese.

I bet the Spanish dialect there is highly unusual. There are actually more English speakers in Nigeria than in the UK, but some people might not call it English.

Wizard
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Wizard
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September 27th, 2012 at 1:19:04 PM permalink
I got the bonus question correct.

However I got the first one wrong, but I think had a reasonable guess, which was
Sierra Leone
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 27th, 2012 at 2:11:54 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I got the bonus question correct.

However I got the first one wrong, but I think had a reasonable guess, which was



That is a reasonable guess. The name is actually Italian, not Spanish. According to wikipedia, the name was originally Portuguese, but it was later rendered in Italian. Which leads to an interesting question for which I have no answer. Why would a country in that portion of the world have an Italian name? Italy had no involvement with that region of Africa.
WongBo
WongBo
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September 27th, 2012 at 2:45:31 PM permalink
Wikipedia discusses the formation of a corporate body called the Sierra Leone Company founding a colony of ex-slaves.
I assume the name of the company resulted from the translation of the original,
but no explanation for the change is given.
It seems possible or even probable that the name was changed before the foundation of the company and colony.
Probably just corrupted colloquially.
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 27th, 2012 at 3:39:46 PM permalink
Quote: WongBo

Wikipedia discusses the formation of a corporate body called the Sierra Leone Company founding a colony of ex-slaves.
I assume the name of the company resulted from the translation of the original,
but no explanation for the change is given.
It seems possible or even probable that the name was changed before the foundation of the company and colony.
Probably just corrupted colloquially.



The Portuguese Serra de Leão goes back to the 15th century. The name was rendered in Italian at some point, but long before the Sierra Leone Company was founded at the very end of the 18th century.

If it was corrupted colloquially you would think that there were some Italian speakers that were influential enough to change the name of a region.
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 12th, 2012 at 1:54:50 PM permalink
I just came across the name/title Santa Muerte today, also known by various other titles. You can read the Wiki link for the long version, but she is a saint of death, which some disaffected Catholics in Mexico find solace in. Evidently she has roots in the pre-Columbian Indian religions, and she made her way into Catholicism. It would seem from Wikipedia she is a pretty significant figure in Mexican Catholicism. I'm surprised I have not heard of her.

Just a little Spanish culture to keep this thread on life support.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 15th, 2012 at 12:57:00 PM permalink
Sorry to keep talking to myself, but this is a follow-up to the above post. I asked my landscaper Lamberto about Santa Muerte today. That was a mistake. I had to suffer through a sermon about the basics of Christianity and the joy Jesus brings to his heart. In the end, he basically said Santa Muerte was the same person as the devil.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 16th, 2012 at 7:39:26 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I just came across the name/title Santa Muerte today, also known by various other titles.
Just a little Spanish culture to keep this thread on life support.



The figures of Santa Muerte are used in a lot of both horror movies, and in gangster films. They are very popular in Tepito ,the legendary open air market in Mexico City. The saying is that if you need an elephant you can find one in Tepito.

While Mexican markets are a lot of fun, Tepito is usually considered too dangerous for foreigners.




She is unrelated to the more whimsical skeletons that you see everywhere.
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 16th, 2012 at 8:26:21 AM permalink
Today is Lunes Martes, which means Lupe's weekly visit. I asked her about Santa Muerte and got a pretty strong response, which is unusual for Lupe.

She said that belief in Santa Muerte is basically a popular form of witchcraft in Mexico. I definitely got the opinion it is contrary to Catholicism, and something good Catholics like her self stay away from. However, she told a story that she knew two different people who worshiped SM. According to one of them, SM cured her daughter of cancer and brought them wealth. The other had an alter devoted to SM on which she would put apples and other food. However, to Lupe, the SM is still very taboo.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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