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Wizard
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Wizard
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August 14th, 2012 at 9:58:44 AM permalink
Quote: teddys

the dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles happened after their athletes qualified, they competed as Independent Olympic Athletes. (You may have noticed them in the Parade of Nations hamming it up).



¡Que interesante!

I must have been out of the room or they went to commercial break when the "independent athletes" were introduced. Under what flag and title did they march? What other parts of the world sent such independents?

Fecha: 14-8-12
Palabra: Bramar


Today's SWD means to bellow/roar. A similar, and more common, word is gritar. I tend to think that gritar is closer to scream, and bramar means to say something loudly, likely in anger. The Skipper yelling at Gilligan readily comes to mind so...

No me hagas enojar te o te bramaré y te golpearé con mi gorra. = Don't get me angry, or I will yet at you and hit you with my cap.

p.s. Sorry about butchering the last ejemplo. Please add 20 push-ups to my tab.
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Nareed
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August 14th, 2012 at 11:16:19 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to bellow/roar. A similar, and more common, word is gritar. I tend to think that gritar is closer to scream, and bramar means to say something loudly, likely in anger.



It's used to denote the noise an angry bull makes, too. So when aplied to people, it's yelling in an irrational, disjointed manner.
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teddys
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August 14th, 2012 at 3:23:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

¡Que interesante!

I must have been out of the room or they went to commercial break when the "independent athletes" were introduced. Under what flag and title did they march? What other parts of the world sent such independents?

They were after Iceland and before India in NBC's coverage. They marched under the Olympic flag as "Independent Olympic Athletes." There were three athletes from Curacao: one sailor, one sprinter, and one judoka. There was also a men's marathoner from South Sudan (the newest country in the world) in the group, but he wasn't present at the Opening Ceremony. Their flagbearer was Brooklyn Kerlin, a member of the London organizing committee.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
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August 15th, 2012 at 10:06:47 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

So am I completely mistaken, or are "Otrabanda" and "del otro bando" really that close in meaning between Spanish and Dutch? I don't think of those as being tightly related languages.



"Otrabanda" and "del otro bando" are not Dutch, but they are Papiamento. Papiamento is a creole language derived from African Languages and either Portuguese or Spanish, with some influences from Amerindian languages, English, and Dutch.

Nearly every language has some loan words from most other languages. You are correct that Dutch and Spanish are not closely related, but two loan words are:
babor= port side of a ship: from French babord "portside", from Dutch bakboord "left side of a ship"
berbiquí= carpenter's brace: from regional French veberquin (French vilebrequin), from Dutch wimmelken, from wimmel "auger, drill, carpenter's brace" +

The best known Spanish words borrowed from Old English are the directions.
este= east: from French est, from Middle English est, from Old English ēast, from Germanic (*)aust-, from the IE root (*)awes-, aus "to shine" .
norte= north: from Old French nord, from Old English north, from Germanic (*)north-, from the IE root (*)nr-to "north", from (*)nr- "wiktionary:under, to the left"
oeste= west: from Middle English west, from Old English west, from Germanic (*)west-, from (*)wes-to-, from (*)wes-, from (*)wespero- "evening, dusk"
sud-= south (combining form): from Old French sud "south", from Old English sūth, from Germanic (*)sunthaz, from the IE root (*)sun-, swen-, variants of (*)sāwel- "sun"
sur= south: from French sud, from Old English sūth, see sud- above.
Wizard
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Wizard
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August 15th, 2012 at 10:24:07 AM permalink
Fecha: 15-8-12
Palabra: Patrón


Today's SWD means "boss." I'm sure the beginning readers are thinking to themselves, "Wait a minute, I thought the word for boss is jefe." That too. I tend to think that patrón conveys greater respect.

The question for the intermediate readers is to compare and contrast the Spanish patrón and the English "patron."

Ejemplo time.

Hay un patrón al fin del túnel. = There is a boss at the end of the tunnel.

Trivia time! What game does this example refer to? No searching!
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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August 15th, 2012 at 11:56:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the intermediate readers is to compare and contrast the Spanish patrón and the English "patron."



In English it's used to mean customer. However, in one novellette, Robert Heinlein uses it to mean boss. The setting is a colonial type of Venus (grossly uscientific by today's standards), and the plantation owners are called "patrons."

The equivalent for "patron," in the usual sense, in Spanish is "parroquiano/a."

Oh, "patrón" also means "pattern."

Quote:

Hay un patrón al fin del túnel. = There is a boss at the end of the tunnel.



"..al finAL del tunel"
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pacomartin
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August 15th, 2012 at 12:35:41 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

In English it's used to mean customer.


Original meaning was "a lord-master, a protector," c.1300, from Old French patrun (12c.), from Middle Latin patronus "patron saint, bestower of a benefice, lord, master, model, pattern," from Latin patronus "defender, protector, advocate," from pater (gen. patris) "father."

Commercial sense of "regular customer" first recorded circa 1600.
Doc
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August 15th, 2012 at 3:13:36 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Original meaning was "a lord-master, a protector," ....


I guess that it is in this sense that one may be called a patron of the arts? That usage means more of a sponsor or benefactor than just a customer.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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August 15th, 2012 at 3:37:30 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

I guess that it is in this sense that one may be called a patron of the arts? That usage means more of a sponsor or benefactor than just a customer.



That is the second oldest meaning of the world

  1. patron c1300: lord protector
  2. patron c1300's: "one who advances the cause" (of an artist, institution, etc.), usually by the person's wealth and power
  3. patronage (n) 1400's "right of presenting a qualified person to a church benefice,"
  4. patronize (v) 1580s: "to act as a patron towards," from patron + -ize.
  5. patron 1600: Commercial sense of "regular customer"
  6. Patron saint 1717: was originally simply patron (late 14c.)
  7. patronage (n) 1769: General sense of "power to give jobs or favors"
  8. patronize 1797: "treat in a condescending way"
Wizard
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August 16th, 2012 at 7:44:52 AM permalink
Fecha: 16-8-12
Palabra: Pavonearse


Today's SWD means to brag/show off/swagger.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast pavonearse y contonearse. The latter means to swagger only, as far as I know, but what is the difference in the swaggering?

Ejemplo time.

Tengo calor viendo Ginger pavonearte en toda la isla. = I'm getting hot watching Ginger swagger all over the island.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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