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Nareed
Nareed
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August 8th, 2012 at 6:52:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 8-8-12
Palabra: Fracasar


Today's SWD means to make a mess of things.



Actually it means "to fail." But it does NOT mean to obtain a failing grade in a test or assignment.

Quote:

Gilligan hizo un fracasado de nuestro intento de salir la isla, una vez más. = Gilligan made a mess of our attempt to leave the island, again.



"Gilligan made a loser of our attempt...."

"Fracasado" means "loser," or "failure" as in "The guy's a misserable failure at everything he attempts."

try: "Gilligan hizó fracasar nuestro intento de escapar otra vez." "Gilligan made our escape attempt fail again."
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Wizard
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Wizard 
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August 8th, 2012 at 9:49:35 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

To paraphrase Victor Hugo once again: "????"



I was out of town the last week and a half and posting from my Sony laptop, from which I couldn't figure out how to make the Spanish letters other than by copy and paste. So, so to save myself the trouble, I copied all of them into the post above.

Business idea! The first person to market a keyboard with the Spanish letters, as well as the commonly used English symbols, will make a lot of money. A flaw to the usual Keyboard in Spanish speaking countries is no ampersand. Meanwhile there are 12 function keys, none of which I have ever used.

Fecha: 9-8-12
Palabra: Escupir


Today's SWD means to spit.

Ejemplo time.

La razón por la que no me gusta Major League Baseball es que los jugadores escupen tabaco de mascar en todo el campo. = The reason I don't like Major League Baseball is because the player spit chewing tobacco all over the field.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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August 8th, 2012 at 11:20:30 PM permalink

escupidor de fuego = In English we say fire-breather, while in Spanish you say fire-spitter


When you go to a dentist you use a cuspidor
pacomartin
pacomartin
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August 8th, 2012 at 11:25:15 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Fracasado" means "loser," or "failure"



Wizard
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Wizard 
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August 9th, 2012 at 8:07:57 AM permalink
What does reggeaton mean?

A while back I think we were trying to figure out what the "sixes and sevens" lyric meant in the song Don't Cry for me Argentina.

Although she's dressed up to the nines
At sixes and sevens with you


On the Today show there has been a segment called "Al's English Class" where Al Rocker says something in English English and challenges the audience to translate it to American English. Today's sentence included the "sixes and sevens" expression. As I recall, he said it meant to be confused.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Doc
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August 9th, 2012 at 8:31:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A while back I think we were trying to figure out what the "sixes and sevens" lyric meant in the song Don't Cry for me Argentina.


I can't remember whether I offered this before, but it is in agreement with Al's comment. This is from "Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson, one of the references I keep on my bookshelf:
Quote:

sixes and sevens. I'm at sixes and sevens, in a state of confusion, trying to explain this expression, which dates back to 1340. One theory is that it comes from the biblical phrase (Job 5:19): "He shall deliver thee is six troubles: yea in seven there shall be no evil touch thee." More likely the term evolved from the old dice game of hazard. Sinque and sice ("five" and "six") were the most risky bets to make in the old game, and anyone who tried to throw those numbers was considered careless and confused. Later sinque and sice became "six" and "seven." Perhaps the change simply occurred because the terms looked and sounded somewhat alike. But it is possible that six and seven (an impossible throw in dice and two numbers that add up to the unlucky 13) represent a joking shift. Only about a century and a half ago did set on six and seven take on its plural form and become (set) at sixes and sevens. The phrase is still widely used today. A similar, older Italian expression, a tredici, "at 13," may be the source of the expression.

Nareed
Nareed
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August 9th, 2012 at 2:02:57 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Business idea! The first person to market a keyboard with the Spanish letters, as well as the commonly used English symbols, will make a lot of money. A flaw to the usual Keyboard in Spanish speaking countries is no ampersand. Meanwhile there are 12 function keys, none of which I have ever used.



My keyboard says to tell you: "&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&. Shift-6 :P"

But, seriously, some years ago I remember seeing an idea for a keybaord with tiny screens on top of each key. If you changed the configutation, the screens would display new characters. This would be useful for multilingual users, perhaps, and for gamers.

Quote:

La razón por la que no me gusta Major League Baseball es que los jugadores escupen tabaco de mascar en todo el campo. = The reason I don't like Major League Baseball is because the player spit chewing tobacco all over the field.



Too wordy. "No me gusta el beisbol porque los jugadores se la pasan escupiendo tabaco."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
siobhan12345
siobhan12345
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August 10th, 2012 at 12:39:49 PM permalink
what a great thread!!!!
love it :))
smart folk on here!

go raibh maith agat:))
Wizard
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August 10th, 2012 at 1:09:43 PM permalink
Fecha: 10-8-12
Palabra: Despilfarrar


Today's SWD means to waste/squander. In contrast, gastar, means to spend, but not necessarily wastefully.

The question for the advanced readers is to compare today's SWD to the English "pilfer" for a common root.

Ejemplo time.

Gasté parte de mi dinero en putas y apostando. Despilfarré el resto. = I spent some of my money on hookers and gambling. The rest I wasted.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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August 10th, 2012 at 1:15:37 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Gasté parte de mi dinero en putas y apostando. Despilfarré el resto. = I spent some of my money on hookers and gambling. The rest I wasted.



That word is a bit archaic by now. The old saw you quoted goes "Gasté mi parte de mi dinero en mujeres y en el juego. El resto lo malgasté." I'm not enamored of that term either....

Try this one: I lost my money in two ways. First gradually & then suddenly.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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