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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 24th, 2012 at 9:58:17 PM permalink
Fecha: 25-07-12
Palabra: pocilga


Today's SWD means pigsty. I have no idea about the etymology of the word. The word for pig in Spanish is cerdo, and I don't see that in pocilga anywhere. I have no doubt that Paco will come to the rescue and explain it.

Ejemplo time.

Desde Mary Ann se fue en huelga, nuestro cabaña parece como una pocilga. = Since Mary Ann went on strike, our hut looks like a pigsty.
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Nareed
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July 25th, 2012 at 6:36:18 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Desde Mary Ann se fue en huelga, nuestro cabaña parece como una pocilga. = Since Mary Ann went on strike, our hut looks like a pigsty.



"Desde QUE Mary Ann se PUSO en huelga, nuestrA cabaña parece UNA..."

And you still haven't corrected the two earlier examples...
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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 25th, 2012 at 6:41:30 AM permalink
I did not realize you were waiting on corrections, since you pretty much told me all the errors. However, I wish to be an alumno bien.

Quote: Wiz

No puedo soportar los pasteles plátanos de Mary Ann, ni siquiera un día más. = I'm not able to stand Mary Ann's banana pies, not even one more day.



Quote: Nareed

You have three errors:

Pastel = Cake
Pay (or Pie) = Pie

Next it should be "plátano" rather than "plátanos." You're referring to the pies' flavor, not the ingredients. In English you do not say "bananaS pies."

And you're missing a "DE" in the first part of the sentence.



No puedo soportar de los payes plátano de Mary Ann, ni siquiera un día más.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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July 25th, 2012 at 6:57:20 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, I wish to be an alumno bien.



"BUEN alumno."

Quote:

No puedo soportar de los payes plátano de Mary Ann, ni siquiera un día más.



This is why you need to show your corrections.

"No puedo soportar los payS DE plátano de Mary Ann..."
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pacomartin
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July 25th, 2012 at 7:09:58 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Cheap restaurants are more likely to advertise "comida corrida." Medium-priced and higher have a "menú del día." Of course it varies.
BTW, your first photo is either not from Mexico, or from a border city. That price is ridiculously low for pesos.



Here is a photo from D.F. This business is on sale for MXN$80,000 or less than US$6,000.


Where I lived in Oaxaca City, the comida corrida was regularly 35 pesos or less.

I had no idea who would pay Burger King prices (near the square).
pacomartin
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July 25th, 2012 at 7:18:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 25-07-12
Palabra: pocilga


Today's SWD means pigsty. I have no idea about the etymology of the word. The word for pig in Spanish is cerdo, and I don't see that in pocilga anywhere. I have no doubt that Paco will come to the rescue and explain it.



cerdo comes from Latin seta which means bristle
pocilga comes from Latin porcus which means pig or pork

I assume one word is for the animal, and another for the meat. In English the word "pig" is Anglo Saxon in origin, while "pork" is from Latin.
Nareed
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July 25th, 2012 at 9:19:40 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Here is a photo from D.F. This business is on sale for MXN$80,000 or less than US$6,000.



I wouldn't eat there.

Quote:

Where I lived in Oaxaca City, the comida corrida was regularly 35 pesos or less.



Almost avery other place in the country is cheaper than Mexico City, but that must ahve been some years ago. There has been a great deal of inlfation, especially in some basic staples like food.

Quote:

I had no idea who would pay Burger King prices (near the square).



Poeple who like clean food?

Seriously, lots of people. US fast food franchises tend to do very well here. Of course Taco Bell never had a chance, and I'm not sure why Wendy's wasn't a hit.
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pacomartin
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July 25th, 2012 at 9:46:31 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Poeple who like clean food? Seriously, lots of people. US fast food franchises tend to do very well here. Of course Taco Bell never had a chance, and I'm not sure why Wendy's wasn't a hit.



Not in Oaxaca. The state has close to 4 million people. There are 3 Burger Kings, 3 McDonalds, 1 Pizza Hut, 1 Subway, and 1 KFC in the entire state.

Most of fast food was near UABJO.

The folded tlayuda's were pretty common for fast food. So were broiled chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza by the slice, tortas, etc.

Fast Food stands near the market in Oaxaca.

Pick out your meat, and they would cook it up and serve it with onions, tortillas, guacamole, and sodas.
Wizard
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July 26th, 2012 at 7:59:58 AM permalink
Fecha: 26-07-12
Palabra: Galleta salada
.

Today's SWD would seem to mean salty cookie, but is the term for a pretzel.

Pretzels have been around in Germany for at least 1,000 years. In Germany they call them a ... pretzel. The question for the advanced readers is why did English adopt the German word for them, but Spanish did not?

Another question is what does the root gall mean? Here are some other words beginning in gall:

Gallardear = To behave gracefully
Gallardete = Banner
Gallina = Hen
Gallo =Rooster

Ejemplo time.

¿Moza, puede tener una Galleta salada con mi escalope de ternera con guarnición? = Waitress, may I have a pretzel with my wiener schnitzel?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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July 26th, 2012 at 8:35:21 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD would seem to mean salty cookie, but is the term for a pretzel.



You won't see many pretzels in Mexico, either the crunchy snack kind or the hot, bread-like one, but when you do they're labeled as "pretzels." On the other hand, things like saltines and other salty crackers are known as "galletas saladas." It's like "pan dulce," meaning "pastry" rather than "sweet bread."

I'm guessing your book calls "pretzels" "galletas saladas." I've no idea why.

Quote:

¿Moza, puede tener una Galleta salada con mi escalope de ternera con guarnición? = Waitress, may I have a pretzel with my wiener schnitzel?



I'll give you a pass on "moza," though that would get you laughs in any restaurant here :) But in any event you're asking the waitress if she may have a cracker with your main dish with a side of something.

Let's take the second part of the sentence. I'm not sure what a "wiener schnitzel" is, but I do recall menu items like "escalopA de ternera" in some restaurants. I don't know what that is, either, as I don't eat veal, except for the ver more occasional "milanesa." "Guarnición," now, is what the main dish is accompanied with, or a side dish. So what you came up with is like saying, errors and all "Miss, may you have a cracker with my veal with garden salad?"

I'll correct the first part, too, because it's tricky. In Spanish "may I have" is non-existent. Instead you say things like "could you bring me..." or "do you have any..." In this case go with "Señorita, me puede traer galletas saldas?"
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