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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 20th, 2012 at 9:27:57 PM permalink
Fecha: 21-07-12
Palabra: Replantear


Today's SWD means to raise again/reopen. In the reflexive (replantearse), it means to rethink/reconsider.

Ejemplo time.

Catedrático, creo que debes replantearte tu idea a salir de la isla. = Professor, I think you should reconsider your idea to get off the island.
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Nareed
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July 20th, 2012 at 9:45:53 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Catedrático, creo que debes replantearte tu idea a salir de la isla. = Professor, I think you should reconsider your idea to get off the island.



The proper and common Spanish for "professor" is "profesor" (accent on the last syllable). "Catedrático" does mean something similar, but 1) it's not as common and 2) it's not used to address someone, just as you wouldn't address someone as "engineer," or "mathematician."

And it's "...para salir."
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Wizard
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July 20th, 2012 at 11:38:20 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Catedrático" ...



Sorry, I knew you were going to prefer profesor, but was curious to know what you had to say about a catedrático.

Speaking of infrequently used Spanish words, I thought I would post a review of Cuentos Españoles. Paco may have recommended it a long time ago, as it has been on my shelf gathering dust for months. However, I was feeling guilty for ignoring it, so lugged it up Mouth Whitney with me, along with 45 pounds of other stuff. Do I get points for effort?

This may not have been the best idea I ever had. I'm not sure if it was the Spanish Spanish, or that most of it was written centuries ago, but I barely recognized the language in it. I seriously was worried that I was setting my progress back with confusing myself. Here is just a very small sampling.

English Cuentos Españoles American Spanish
Village Aldea Pueblo
Young man Mancebo Muchacho
Courteous Fino Amable
Face Rostro Cara
Pregnant Preñado Embarazada


However, I must say that I enjoyed about half the stories. They tend deal with themes of morality and the struggles of the common man.

Here were some of my favorites.

  • De lo que aconteció a un mancebo que se casó con una mujer muy fuerte y muy brava. -- Don Juan Manuel
  • La fuerza de la sange -- Miguel de Cervantes
  • El libro talonario -- Pedro Antonio


Maybe it is due to a small sampling, but I liked the older stories more. To be honest, after I got frustrated cutting through the Spanish I just read the odd-numbered pages in the English translation.

Overall, I would recommend this book for the reader interested in Spanish short stories or for those who already have a very solid foundation in the Language.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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July 21st, 2012 at 3:04:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Paco may have recommended it a long time ago, as it has been on my shelf gathering dust for months. However, I was feeling guilty for ignoring it, so lugged it up Mouth Whitney with me, along with 45 pounds of other stuff. Do I get points for effort?

However, I must say that I enjoyed about half the stories. They tend deal with themes of morality and the struggles of the common man.



Yes you do get an A for effort, but I recommended a simpler text without reliance on the classics
Short Stories in Spanish: New Penguin Parallel Text


Novela de La fuerza de la sangre
Una noche de las calurosas del verano, volvían de recrearse del río en Toledo un anciano hidalgo con su mujer, un niño pequeño, una hija de edad de diez y seis años y una criada. La noche era clara; la hora, las once; el camino, solo, y el paso, tardo, por no pagar con cansancio la pensión que traen consigo las holguras que en el río o en la vega se toman en Toledo.


It is no surprise that you would find 400 year old spanish difficult to read, as English spelling from the same period is so difficult to read.

Good friend for Jesus sake forbeare
To digg the dust encloased heare
Blessed by y man y spares hes stones
And curst be he y moves my bones
Nareed
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July 21st, 2012 at 10:07:54 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Sorry, I knew you were going to prefer profesor, but was curious to know what you had to say about a catedrático.



Swell! That's just bully! Felicitations are in order. Let's grab some tonic from the ice box to drink while we cane the motorway in the roadster.

There :P

Quote:

I'm not sure if it was the Spanish Spanish, or that most of it was written centuries ago, but I barely recognized the language in it.



Yes.

I can barely make sense of Cervantes. In those days they used prepositions that are now museum pieces. But, honestly, how many modern English speakers can read Shakespeare without some explanations at the least?
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Wizard
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July 21st, 2012 at 9:38:03 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Let's grab some tonic from the ice box



It is not unusual to refer to a refrigerator as an "ice box." I never do, finding it too informal, but I've heard it many times. However, I get your point.

Quote: Nareed

But, honestly, how many modern English speakers can read Shakespeare without some explanations at the least?



When I read Shakespeare I use the same kind of bilingual book like Cuentos Españoles, only old English to new English. They are very helpful. I hate to get off topic, but the introduction of one of the stories in Cuentos Españoles titled De lo que aconteció a un mancebo que se casó con una mujer muy fuerte y muy brava is said to have inspired Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew.

Fecha: 22-07-12
Palabra: cerradura


Today's SWD means lock. Breaking it down we see the cerra, which means to close, and dura, which means hard. So, to remember this one, think of it as closing something so that it would be hard to open (without the llave).

What I find peculiar is that there isn't a Spanish word for the verb lock, at least not that I can find. I think to say "Lock the door" you would need to say something like Cierra la puera con la cerradura. Note the use of the imperative conjugation of cerrar (do I get any points?). I wonder if people that work in lock and key stores in Spanish-speaking countries ever say to each other, "You know, somebody should think of a verb for 'to lock.'"

So, I've run out of things to say. A long time ago. Let's get on with the...

Ejemplo time.

¿Porqué estan muchas cerraduras delante de la iglesia? = Why are there so many locks in front of the church?

Trivia time!

What the heck am I talking about with that ejemplo?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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July 22nd, 2012 at 3:34:03 AM permalink
In this case Spanish seems much more logical than English. Cerrojo means a bolt or a latch, cerrar means to close, cierre means a fastener, and cerradura means to lock.

The English word "lock" has multiple meanings, including a lock for boats, a lock of hair, lock-step, and loosely related concepts like locking arms.
Nareed
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July 22nd, 2012 at 4:14:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It is not unusual to refer to a refrigerator as an "ice box."



Actually an ice box is a device that existed before refrigerators. Thing of a refrigerator, more or less, without a refrigeration system. instead you put ice in it every day and that kept the inside cold.

Quote:

I think to say "Lock the door" you would need to say something like Cierra la puera con la cerradura.



"Cierra con llave."

Quote:

¿Porqué estan muchas cerraduras delante de la iglesia? = Why are there so many locks in front of the church?



I'm picturing a bunch of locks scattered around the steps or walk leading up to the church. If that was your intent, and I can't see why it should be, than you want to say "al frente de la iglesia."

If you mean the doors have lots of locks in them, which also makes little sense but more than the above, then it's "en la iglesia."
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Wizard
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July 22nd, 2012 at 8:09:17 AM permalink
Evidently some churches in Mexico have a big pile of locks in front, chained together via the locks themselves. It evidently lowers the chances of others gossiping about you. As my source, watch this travel video about Mexico. If your're rushed, skipped to the 1:25 point.

China has a similar thing, but on mountain tops. There couples attach a lock to a chain and throw the key over the ledge. As long as nobody opens the lock your love will remain strong.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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July 22nd, 2012 at 8:32:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Evidently some churches in Mexico have a big pile of locks in front, chained together via the locks themselves.



I've some vague memory of you asking something about that some time ago. Overall I don't pay attention to superstition.
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