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Nareed
Nareed
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July 9th, 2012 at 8:56:11 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to spy on. It should not be confused with espirar, which means to breathe.



Respirar. Espirar means to exhale.


Quote:

Me pregunto si Mary Ann sabe que espiarla desde el árbol de palma cuando ella está en la regadera. (or is it ducha). = I wonder if Mary Ann knows I spy on her from the palm tree while she is in the shower.



"I wonder if Mary Ann knows spying from the tree of palm..."

"...sabe que LA espío desde la PALMERA..."
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 10th, 2012 at 2:45:58 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the advanced readers is whether the English "spy" and Spanish espiar share the same root, and if so, what does it mean?



Spanish also has the noun espía to mean "a spy"

In old French the espier means "to spy" which gave us the English word "spy". Also in Old French espie means a "spy".

They are clearly the same word with one vowel change. The exact etymology of the word is confusing. The word is listed as coming from either a Portuguese word, Gothic, Frankish, Germanic, Middle Dutch, and ultimately from Proto Indo European. Missing from the etymology is Latin or Greek.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 10th, 2012 at 3:12:35 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I've never seen "dolorida" used in any way, shape or form.



That is puzzling, because the DRAE does not list it as a regional variation.
DRAE definition: dolorido, da
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 10th, 2012 at 11:41:44 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

[In old French the espier means "to spy" which gave us the English word "spy". Also in Old French espie means a "spy".



Any connection to esperanza (hope)?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 10th, 2012 at 1:07:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Quote: pacomartin

[In old French the espier means "to spy" which gave us the English word "spy". Also in Old French espie means a "spy".


Any connection to esperanza (hope)?




No! That word esperanza is from Latin spērō. The word "hope" is from "hopian" of Anglo Saxon origin.

Etymological analysis says there may have been a word spelled "spiare" that existed in Vulgar Latin that has never been seen in any source, but the word ultimately comes from some Germanic source.
Nareed
Nareed
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July 10th, 2012 at 1:31:16 PM permalink
Question:

No state or empire in the history of the world has functioned without spies. Given there existed one big Latin empire and several Greek ones, how come their word for spies and espionage did not get passed down to their descendent languages?
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 10th, 2012 at 5:59:48 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Question:

No state or empire in the history of the world has functioned without spies. Given there existed one big Latin empire and several Greek ones, how come their word for spies and espionage did not get passed down to their descendent languages?



The Latin noun for spies was curiosi which did get passed down as English curious, curiousity and Spanish curioso,-sa y curiosidad. It just no longer means "spy" in English. I don't think it means spy in Spanish either. The dictionary defines the noun as (mirón) or pey (chismoso).

Greek for spy is κατάσκοπος (katáskopos) where skopos means "aim, target, watcher," which is obviously related to "scope".

κατά (katá)
(with accusative) towards
το δωμάτιο βλέπει κατά την ανατολή (the room faces east)
(with accusative) during
κατά τη διάρκεια του ταξιδιού (during the trip)
(with accusative) around, about, close to
θα έρθω κατά τις έξι το απόγευμα (I will come at about six pm)
(with genitive) versus, against
Έγινε έγκλημα κατά της Ελλάδας! (Crimes were committed against Greece!)
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 10th, 2012 at 10:02:04 PM permalink
Fecha: 11-7-12
Palabra: Ortographía
(per Nareed's correction, the orthography should be Ortografía.)

Today's SWD means orthography/spelling (noun). It should not be confused with deletrear which is the verb for to spell. To introduce an English word as well, "orthography" is the act of spelling words correctly. One good thing about learning Spanish is it helps your English as well.

Ejemplo time.

El profesor ganó el concurso de ortografía. Ginger era la última. = The Professor won the spelling contest. Ginger came in last.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 11th, 2012 at 3:55:52 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means orthography/spelling (noun). It should not be confused with deletrear which is the verb for to spell. To introduce an English word as well, "orthography" is the act of spelling words correctly. One good thing about learning Spanish is it helps your English as well.



'Deletrear' means to spell, but it implies that you are "sounding out" the syllables of the word as well. Orthography is "spelling" but not so much in the sense of "you spelled the word wrong", as in "what is the proper way to spell a word". For example, the capital of China, should it be spelled 'Peking' or 'Beijing'. In English you have "receipt, conceit, deceit" which are clearly variations of a base word, but only one of them has a silent 'p'. That decision about correct spelling is an orthographic one.

When I was in my Spanish class the teacher made reference to a rather obscure grammar point. Everyone else in the class agreed that it was exactly the same in French, which of course didn't help me at all. I am willing to guess that most English speakers only learn the terminology of grammar because they are studying another language.
Nareed
Nareed
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July 11th, 2012 at 6:52:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra: Ortographía



Don't edit your post.

In Spanish the phoneme "PH" doesn't exist. You see it in foreign brand names, like Philips, but it's not used in Spanish words.

Quote:

El profesor ganó el concurso de ortografía. Ginger era la última. = The Professor won the spelling contest. Ginger came in last.



"...Ginger was last."

"Ginger FUÉ la última." or "Ginger quedó en último lugar."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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