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Nareed
Nareed
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July 6th, 2012 at 8:27:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In this case, are the compliments the direct object or indirect object? I thought they were a direct object, which is why I used la.



Huh? Don't get technical. :)

In the first aprt you're addressing a second person, right? therefore it's "No LE des..." or "No LE de..." because that's how you address someone. The compliments have nothing to do with it.
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pacomartin
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July 6th, 2012 at 11:33:15 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In this case, are the compliments the direct object or indirect object? I thought they were a direct object, which is why I used la.



No des = negative imperitive form
Cumplidos = direct object
le = indirect object pronoun
a Ginger = a prepositional phrase is added for clarity

"No LE des cumplidos" is a complete phrase, but the indirect object is ambiguous

So your statement is correct, that "cumplidos" is the direct object, but you should use the "le" for the indirect object .

The cheat sheet: personal pronouns in spanish
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 7th, 2012 at 9:21:03 AM permalink
Thanks for the help above. So, in No LE des cumplidos. would this be the breakdown:

Subject: The unnamed person who is being commanded to not give compliments.
Verb: Give
Object: Ginger.
Indirect object: The compliments.

Would this also be the case in English, although I'm sure that it matters?

I'm running very busy today. If somebody else wants to post the SWD for July 7, have at it.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 7th, 2012 at 10:21:25 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for the help above. So, in No LE des cumplidos. would this be the breakdown:

Subject: The unnamed person who is being commanded to not give compliments.
Verb: Give
Object: Ginger.
Indirect object: The compliments.



Subject: The unnamed person who is being commanded to "not give compliments". (why you use 2nd person)
Verb: Give (in negative imperative conjugation "no des")
Direct object: The compliments. (the action is "to give", the direct object of that action is "the compliments")
Indirect object pronoun: Le
Indirect object: Ginger (if you add the clarifying prepositional phrase)
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 7th, 2012 at 10:37:25 AM permalink
Word: Talavera


Talavera is a town outside of Toledo Spain which is known for their distinctive pottery. Upon the discovery of a town where the Aztecs made pottery using particularly fine quality clay in the region, the Spaniards converted the production to making copies of the Talavera pottery from Spain.

Authentic Mexican talavera (with a certificate of authenticity) is made by licensed shops such as Uriarte outside of Puebla (near Mexico city) and is very expensive. Talavera manufacturers are regulated by Consejo Regulador de la Talavera, a body which monitors the authenticity and assures the high standards of the craft. If a workshop passes their criteria, it gets a certification. So far, only nine workshops have been given certification. The style is widely imitated in inexpensive copies which can be purchased anywhere in Mexico.

Authentic Talavera


Imitation Talavera
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 8th, 2012 at 1:11:02 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

besides, no one in Mexico says "perro caliente," unless they are trying to make fun of the expression. We say <drumroll> "hot dogs."



Now I'm not saying this isn't true, of course, but evidently people do say perro caliente in the Spanish speaking parts of Miami. Please watch my video of Claudia as evidence. You can forward the 1:20 point where this question is addressed.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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July 8th, 2012 at 1:43:23 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Now I'm not saying this isn't true, of course, but evidently people do say perro caliente in the Spanish speaking parts of Miami.



And perhaps in other parts of the world as well. I fail to see, however, how Miami has anything to do with mexico. Florida was a Spanish colony, then it was bought by the US at some point, and most of the Latino population there are either Cuban, Caribbean or South American.

Better yet, try these links:

http://eventosdeprimera.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/405061.jpg

http://safe-img02.olx.com.mx/ui/2/88/95/34378395_1.jpg

http://safe-img02.olx.com.mx/ui/4/48/65/1266961829_75874365_1-CARRITO-PARA-HOT-DOGS-chapultepec.jpg

http://safe-img03.olx.com.mx/ui/2/47/51/35444651_1.jpg
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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 8th, 2012 at 3:17:59 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I fail to see, however, how Miami has anything to do with mexico.



My point being that maybe they shouldn't make fun of people who say perro caliente in Mexico, when it is a legitimate term for a hot dog in some Spanish-speaking parts of the world.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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July 8th, 2012 at 3:47:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My point being that maybe they shouldn't make fun of people who say perro caliente in Mexico, when it is a legitimate term for a hot dog in some Spanish-speaking parts of the world.



Oh, well. There's this popular way of complaining about bad tacos sold on the street: "Estos tacos ladran cuando los muerdo," implying the tacos are made of dog meat. Given that, no sane person would call a hot dog a "perro caliente," even if the English term means just that. In particular people who sell hot dogs won't call them that, especially those sold from carts or stands on the street.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 8th, 2012 at 6:30:15 PM permalink
Claudia made a joke about the name. It was noisy so I didn't hear exactly what she said, but it was along the lines that perro caliente comes off in Spanish like a dog in heat. I vaguely recall asking my father when I was about five why they called it a "hot dog." He probably was just making this up, but he said that the wiener looks like a dachshund, and of course you're supposed to serve it hot.


Image source: Wikipedia.

Fecha: 08-07-12
Palabra: Sobresalir


This one is easy to get if you know the components, which are often-seen Spanish words.

Sobre = above/on top. It can also mean an envelope.
Salir = leave.
Sobresalir = stand out.

I think of it as being so above that rest that you left everybody else and stand out as the best. Of course, things can stand out not just for being the best, but I find it a good memory device.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast sobresalir y destacar.

Ejemplo time.

Creo que Ginger se sobresale por la muchacha más hermosa de la isla. = I think Ginger stands out as the prettiest gal on the island.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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