Thread Rating:

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
July 5th, 2012 at 6:50:25 AM permalink
If I may change the topic, what does the last part of this sentence mean:

Esta manaña mamá estaba especialmente animada y se diría que see traía also entre manos.

I would read that as "This morning mother was in particular good mood and I said she brought something between her hands." The last part I tend to think is a figure of speech like "up her sleeve" but I'm not sure.

By the way, my entire childhood my mother scolded me whenever I said "brought" because she thought the past tense of bring is brung. However, to this day, I still disagree with her.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
July 5th, 2012 at 7:41:16 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The online dictionaries back me up that escama can be used as a flake of soap.



You know my opinion of these particular online dictionaries.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
July 5th, 2012 at 7:43:53 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The word Zucaritas means "sugaries".



It's the name given by Kellogg's to its line of frosted flakes down here. But it's a brand name and not a real word.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
July 5th, 2012 at 7:44:28 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

If I may change the topic, what does the last part of this sentence mean:

Esta manaña mamá estaba especialmente animada y se diría que see traía also entre manos.



"...and you could tell she was up to something."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
July 5th, 2012 at 9:46:58 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

By the way, my entire childhood my mother scolded me whenever I said "brought" because she thought the past tense of bring is brung. However, to this day, I still disagree with her.



The tendency to conjugate bring as bring, brung is ancient (since the middle ages). It is a very common dialecal past tense and past participle even among educated speakers of English. However, standard English is to use "brought" for both the simple past, and the participle (I have brought cookies).

The error is to treat "bring" like similar Class 3 Germanic "strong verbs" such as ring/rang/rung, sing/sang/sung, spring/sprang/sprung, cling/clung and string/strung.
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
  • Threads: 171
  • Posts: 10340
July 5th, 2012 at 10:54:33 PM permalink
Muchas Bocas Que Alimentar
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
July 6th, 2012 at 4:37:27 AM permalink
Fecha: 06-07-12
Palabra: Presumir


While today's SWD can be an easy cognate for presume; I think the more frequent meaning is to be conceited. Where I encountered the word it was used as a translation for brag. However, according to Reverso, the closest equivalent to brag is compadrear.

No la das a Ginger cumplidos, por que es demasiado presumido ya. = Don't give Ginger any compliments, she is too conceited already.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
July 6th, 2012 at 4:50:36 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 06-07-12
Palabra: Presumir


While today's SWD can be an easy cognate for presume; I think the more frequent meaning is to be conceited.




The Latin word praesumere, was broken in old French to presumer in the 12the century and in the mid-15c to présomptif.

So English picked up from the French "presume" to mean "to take for granted" and "presumptive" to mean "to be conceited".

Presumably Spanish did not bifurcate the word like French.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
July 6th, 2012 at 6:59:47 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

While today's SWD can be an easy cognate for presume; I think the more frequent meaning is to be conceited. Where I encountered the word it was used as a translation for brag.



Presumir = To show off
Alardear = To brag.

Quote:

However, according to Reverso, the closest equivalent to brag is compadrear.



Really? I've never come across that word before. But "compadre" means a close friend. Initially it meant a clsoe friend you choose to be your child's godfather (the female equivalent is comadre). But since that is a largely "goyishe" custom here, I know very little about it.

Quote:

No la das a Ginger cumplidos, por que es demasiado presumido ya. = Don't give Ginger any compliments, she is too conceited already.



I wont' tray to detranslate becasue it's too FUBAR to do so easily. But I'll point out it's wrong, not mention rude, to reffer to Ginger with masculine adjectives.

"No LE des cumplidos a Ginger, por que YA es demasiado presumidA."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
July 6th, 2012 at 8:16:26 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

But I'll point out it's wrong, not mention rude, to reffer to Ginger with masculine adjectives.



Sorry. Coming from a language that doesn't have feminine and masculine adjectives, it is a hard habit to get into.

Quote:

"No LE des cumplidos a Ginger, por que YA es demasiado presumidA."



In this case, are the compliments the direct object or indirect object? I thought they were a direct object, which is why I used la.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: