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Nareed
Nareed
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July 4th, 2012 at 11:04:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

You should make that a poll. Between two questions with two possibilites each, shouldn't there be four choices?



Five. In this kind of news item, there should always be a "who cares" option :)
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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:02:26 PM permalink
Fecha: 05-07-12
Palabra: Escama


Today's SWD means flake. However, not all flakes. A flake of snow is a copo. Corn Flakes are Copos de Maíz. A flake of paint is a desconchón. Escama is used for a flake of skin or soap.

The question for the advanced readers is to provide a rule of thumb for which term applies to other kinds of flakes. Another question is whether the cama in escama refers to a bed.

Ejemplo time.

Me deslicé en una escama de jabón. = I slipped on a flake of soap.

p.s. Spanish does not make it easy conjugating deslizar. Sometimes the z turns into a c, and sometimes not.
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Nareed
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:17:51 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means flake.



Not really. And this time the dictionary does back me up.

It means "scale" as in the things that reptiles and fish have instead of skin.

It can mean something shaped like a scale, but that is a secondary definition and it's definitely not commonly used.

Quote:

A flake of snow is a copo.



Yes.

Quote:

Corn Flakes are Copos de Maíz.



No. Corn Flakes are actually sold as "Corn Flakes" here :) But the "proper" term is "Hojuelas de maíz."

Quote:

A flake of paint is a desconchón.



I'd no idea. Come to think of it, I've never heard paint chip called a flake. Nor have I heard it called anything at all in Spanish.

Quote:

Escama is used for a flake of skin or soap.



It means that. It's not used.

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is to provide a rule of thumb for which term applies to other kinds of flakes.



See above.

Quote:

Another question is whether the cama in escama refers to a bed.



Not to my knowledge.

Quote:

Me deslicé en una escama de jabón. = I slipped on a flake of soap.



Even if it meant a flake of soap, can you slip on one? BTW:

To Slip = Resbalar
To Slide = Deslizar.

Quote:

p.s. Spanish does not make it easy conjugating deslizar. Sometimes the z turns into a c, and sometimes not.



It's a z when followed by an a, o or u. It changes to a c when followed by an e or an i.
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Wizard
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:34:59 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Not really. And this time the dictionary does back me up.

It means "scale" as in the things that reptiles and fish have instead of skin.



Here is the passage from the book where I picked it up.

Tue que recurrir a toda mi fuerza de voluntad para comerme sólo algunas bolitas de chicle y escamas sueltas de chocolate cada noche.

So in other words, a flake of chocolate.

Quote:

Even if it meant a flake of soap, can you slip on one?



Sure. In Mexico, did they show commercials for Irish Spring soap through the seventies of some guy cutting off slices of soap all over Ireland. I've been afraid to go to Ireland ever since for fear of slipping on one. Granted, these chunks were probably too big to be called a "flake."

Quote:

It's a z when followed by an a, o or u. It changes to a c when followed by an e or an i.



Thanks. Is that a general rule for "zar" verbs?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:53:43 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

You should make that a poll. Between two questions with two possibilites each, shouldn't there be four choices?

It is my understanding that Levantate is based out of the U.S., but wouldn't they favor Mexican Spanish?




I don't know what kind of style manuals they use. If you look at census data for the State of NY, nearly twice as many people identify specifically with Puerto Rican as Mexican. Most people do not specify.


New York State 3,416,922
Mexican 457,288
Puerto Rican 1,070,558
Cuban 70,803
Other Hispanic or Latino 1,818,273

Nevada State 673,897
Mexican 524,959
Puerto Rican 20,926
Cuban 19,232
Other Hispanic or Latino 108,780



The tweet from his friend was "Casper is Gay, Only with JLo for Fame and Fortune". So I guess there are four choices, gay or straight, using or not using her.

Isn't she sort of using him? She is 17 years older and just got out of another marriage.
Nareed
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:57:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is the passage from the book where I picked it up.

Tue que recurrir a toda mi fuerza de voluntad para comerme sólo algunas bolitas de chicle y escamas sueltas de chocolate cada noche.

So in other words, a flake of chocolate.



What can I tell you? It doesn't mean that according to the dictionary, and it's not used that way. I've no idea what possessed the translator to use it like that.

I'd have gone with "hojuela de chocolate." There's a cooking term for such things when used for cooking, but that wouldn't apply here.

Quote:

Sure. In Mexico, did they show commercials for Irish Spring soap through the seventies of some guy cutting off slices of soap all over Ireland.



No idea. but I wouldn't call a slice of soap a flake. Flakes are small, like the size of a corn flake.


Quote:

Thanks. Is that a general rule for "zar" verbs?



It's a general rule for all words containing the letter Z. For example, the plural of lápiZ is lápiCes
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Wizard
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July 4th, 2012 at 9:09:17 PM permalink
RE: Irish Spring

Quote: Nareed

No idea.



Please watch this commercial 10,000 times.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 5th, 2012 at 12:46:02 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Tue que recurrir a toda mi fuerza de voluntad para comerme sólo algunas bolitas de chicle y escamas sueltas de chocolate cada noche.



Google translate does use the word "flake", but I can't find one single reference on the internet where this word is used for something like "flakes of chocolate". The word may be related to English squalid, and almost all references are to skin disease, chips of paint, fish, or lizards. For some reason it is also the name of a line of bags.

My guess is that your translator is British, and they are used to the word flake associated with "crumbly chocolate". They thought that escamas was the appropriate Spanish word.


But I would trust Nareed's judgement, and not use the word unless you want to gross someone out.
Wizard
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July 5th, 2012 at 5:48:48 AM permalink
The online dictionaries back me up that escama can be used as a flake of soap.

Reverso

1 (Bot, Zool) scale
2 [+de jabón, pintura] flake jabón en escamas soapflakes
3 (=resentimiento) resentment (=sospecha) suspicion
4 (Méx) * cocaine, coke *

SpanishDict

feminine noun
1. scale (de peces, reptiles)
2. flake (de jabón, piel)
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 5th, 2012 at 6:28:31 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The online dictionaries back me up that escama can be used as a flake of soap.



I guess I've lost the bubble. It doesn't seem like a big stretch to go from flakes of paint or skin to flakes of soap. I thought the question was would a normal Spanish speaker use this word to describe chocolate flakes (which seems to more common in Britain).




The word Zucaritas means "sugaries".

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