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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 1st, 2012 at 8:24:47 AM permalink
Fecha: 01-07-12
Palabra: Foso


Today's word means pit or moat. Interestingly, fosa means a grave.

The question for the advanced readers is what root do foso y fosa come from, and what other words might we get from this root?

Se cayó el anillo de oro en el foso de condenar. = I dropped the gold ring in the pit of doom.

p.s. To all the readers in Mexico -- No olvide a votar. (note the conjugation in the imperative, which I'm sure I got wrong somehow.)
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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July 1st, 2012 at 8:30:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Se cayó el anillo de oro en el foso de condenar. = I dropped the gold ring in the pit of doom.



"Se ME cayó el anillo..." Otherwise you're saying "the ring fell down..." And if the action was on purpose then it's "Tiré el anillo en..."

The rest is harder. I don't think there's a good translation for "pit of doom."

Quote:

p.s. To all the readers in Mexico -- No olvide a votar. (note the conjugation in the imperative, which I'm sure I got wrong somehow.)



Drop the "A" Otherwise it means "Don't forget to a vote."

I didn't forget. I just have no reason to.

Besides, driving about 20 miles and paying about $20 in tolls is too high a price for a "protest" vote.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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July 1st, 2012 at 11:06:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

p.s. To all the readers in Mexico -- No olvide a votar. (note the conjugation in the imperative, which I'm sure I got wrong somehow.)



Judging by the dozens of postings on the web, people are just as likely to use the familiar.
No olvides votar

It seems like a certain level of post election protests are inevitable, but I hope it doesn't bring the country to a stranglehold.
pacomartin
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July 1st, 2012 at 11:13:52 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the advanced readers is what root do foso y fosa come from, and what other words might we get from this root?




Latin: fossa is a trench or moat.
English fossa Anatomy : a pit, cavity, or depression, as in a bone.
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 1st, 2012 at 9:11:23 PM permalink
Fecha: 02-07-12
Palabra: cortacésped


Today's SWD means lawnmower. It is pretty obvious if you know that cortar means cut, and césped means lawn.

Other words for lawnmower are cortadora y podadora. Do we need more than one?

Ejemplo time.

Gané en el lugar último in la carrera de cortacéspedes. = I came in last in the lawnmower race.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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July 1st, 2012 at 9:23:55 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Other words for lawnmower are cortadora y podadora. Do we need more than one?



Ask a Spaniard. They're to blame for the language anyway....

But, what's the difference between cutting the grass and mowing the lawn?

Quote:

Gané en el lugar último in la carrera de cortacéspedes. = I came in last in the lawnmower race.



<shakes head>

"I won in the place last en the...."

Try: "Quedé en último lugar EN la carrera..."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 1st, 2012 at 10:19:27 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

In fact I've been trying to translate antepenúltima for the past few minutes without success. Merriam Webster says it means "third from last."



Nareed
Is penúltima a word in common usage in Mexico? The word penultimate is a valid English word, but it is not normally used in casual conversation. Many people don't know what it means.



Mowing and cutting were at one point two different things. Mowing meant using a scythe. With the advent of powered tools, the two concepts merged.
Nareed
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July 2nd, 2012 at 6:50:50 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Is penúltima a word in common usage in Mexico?



Very common.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
odiousgambit
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July 3rd, 2012 at 1:06:51 AM permalink
Why is Meteorology now hearing so many Spanish words?

The new one: Derecho. How do you pronounce that?

and of course I am thinking of El Nino and La Nina. I have always assumed both words were Spanish even though for some reason one is an 'El' and the other a 'La'.
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder
pacomartin
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July 3rd, 2012 at 6:20:31 AM permalink
Quote: odiousgambit

Why is Meteorology now hearing so many Spanish words? The new one: Derecho. How do you pronounce that? and of course I am thinking of El Nino and La Nina. I have always assumed both words were Spanish even though for some reason one is an 'El' and the other a 'La'.



"El Niño" as a meteorological name was first recorded in 1893. But it seems to have arisen naturally in the language since conditions were often observed around Christmas, so the reference is to the coming of the Christ child.

"La Niña" as the opposite of "El Niño" was originally called "El Viejo" or (the old one) as the opposite of the young boy. The term for little girl has now become the standard.

"Derecho" also goes back to the late 19th century, but it was deliberately chosen by an American metereologist. It's not new, you just haven't heard it before because it is relatively rare.


El and La are both the words "the" in English, just one is masculine, and the other is feminine. English used to have grammatical gender, but it was lost about a thousand years ago. Spanish retained grammatical gender from Latin.

Spanish words are usually pronounced exactly as written. If the word ends in a vowel, then accent the second to last syllable.

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