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Nareed
Nareed
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June 23rd, 2012 at 10:39:55 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD seems to have lots of usages, but the main one seems to be to collect/earn/be paid.



The two main usages are "to charge" and "to collect." In the latter, it means specifically to collect money you're owed. A collections agency would be "agencia de cobranza."

Quote:

I think cobrar implies being paid for something you did, and ganar implies winning or falling into money.



Not necessarily. "Ganar," concerning being paid money for labor or for effort, comes to mean more or less "to earn." The problem, as we discussed earlier, is that "ganar" also means "to win." For "cobrar" see above.

And before Paco gets to it, hopefully, a related word is "recobrar," which only means "to recover."

Quote:

Una vez traté de ser un gigoló, pero nunca cobré mucho. = Once I tried to be a gigolo, but I never earned much.



That actually means "I never charged much. To say earn you'd say "nunca gané mucho.
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pacomartin
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June 23rd, 2012 at 11:58:52 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The two main usages are "to charge" and "to collect." In the latter, it means specifically to collect money you're owed. A collections agency would be "agencia de cobranza."

And before Paco gets to it, hopefully, a related word is "recobrar," which only means "to recover."



We talked about the 're-' prefix earlier. Sometimes it is an intensifier, sometimes it means to 'do again'. In this case the 're-' prefix is an intensifier. Technically 'cobrar' is an aféresis (apheresis) of the verb 'recobrar'. An apheresis is the omission of the first few letters of a word (like coon, or till).


The English use of the word "cover" as a noun or an adjective dating from the 1960's is to refer to an artist's version of someone else's song. I don't know if there is an equivalent in Spanish.

Wizard
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Wizard
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June 23rd, 2012 at 5:42:48 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That actually means "I never charged much.



Maybe that is why I never earned much.


Quote: pacomartin

We talked about the 're-' prefix earlier. Sometimes it is an intensifier, sometimes it means to 'do again'. In this case the 're-' prefix is an intensifier.



In this case it would seem to me to mean "do again." For example, I gave you money, and now you're supposed to give it back to me.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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June 23rd, 2012 at 5:52:29 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In this case it would seem to me to mean "do again." For example, I gave you money, and now you're supposed to give it back to me.



No, in this case it's a different, but related, word. It's identical to the English "recover," which has nothing to do with either charging or collecting money; nor does it men to cover again. A synonym is "recuperar," which again is identical to the English "recuperate."
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pacomartin
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June 24th, 2012 at 12:19:29 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Cobrar" means specifically to collect money you're owed. A collections agency would be "agencia de cobranza."
And before Paco gets to it, hopefully, a related word is "recobrar," which only means "to recover."



You are not doing something again. In the first case you are simply "recovering" your money.

The DRAE is specific that 'cobrar' is an aféresis (Spanish) or apheresis (English) of the verb 'recobrar'. An apheresis is the omission of the first few letters of a word, but doesn't change its meaning.

'Apheresis' has a medical definition as well as a linguistic one.

pacomartin
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June 24th, 2012 at 12:19:49 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Cobrar" means specifically to collect money you're owed. A collections agency would be "agencia de cobranza."
And before Paco gets to it, hopefully, a related word is "recobrar," which only means "to recover."



Wizard,
You are not doing something again. You are simply "recovering" your money.

The DRAE is specific that 'cobrar' is an aféresis (Spanish) or apheresis (English) of the verb 'recobrar'. An apheresis is the omission of the first few letters of a word, but doesn't change its meaning.

'Apheresis' has a medical definition as well as a linguistic one.

Wizard
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Wizard
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June 24th, 2012 at 10:48:32 AM permalink
Fecha: 24-06-12
Palabra: Peinar


Speaking of putting "re" in front of a word I ran across a word yesterday I had difficulty translating, repeinado. It seemed pretty obvious that it was the past participle of something but the dictionary turned up nothing. It seems to me, based on an Internet search, it is based on peinar, which means to comb. Is tacking a "re" in front of it valid Spanish, and if so, does it mean to comb again? In the context I saw the word it never mentioned combing the hair a first time.

A related word is peine, which means a comb (noun).

The question for the advanced readers, other than the one above, is whether peinar comes from the same root as pelo (hair)?

Ejemplo time.

Sigo peinar mi cabello, pero el remolino no se acosta. = I keep combing my hair, but the cowlick won't lay down.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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June 24th, 2012 at 11:03:50 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Speaking of putting "re" in front of a word I ran across a word yesterday I had difficulty translating, repeinado. It seemed pretty obvious that it was the past participle of something but the dictionary turned up nothing. It seems to me, based on an Internet search, it is based on peinar, which means to comb. Is tacking a "re" in front of it valid Spanish, and if so, does it mean to comb again? In the context I saw the word it never mentioned combing the hair a first time.



The verb peinar means "to comb", while the peinado means "hairstyle".

The noun "repeinado" is not in most dictionaries, but there seems to be several times it appears on the internet. I guess it means "outrageous hairstyle" where "re-" is an intensifier. I don't see how it could mean "comb again".

This photo is entitled "Leon Repeinado"
Wizard
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June 24th, 2012 at 9:56:25 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I guess it means "outrageous hairstyle" where "re-" is an intensifier. I don't see how it could mean "comb again".



That would fit in the context I found the word. Thanks.

Fecha: 25-06-12
Palabra: murciélago


Today's SWD means bat, as in the rodent that flies.

Las Vegas seems to have a lot of bats. Between sundown and when it gets dark lots of them can be seen flying about, especially in areas with lots of trees. They seem to be attracted to certain spots. In my neighborhood there is a cluster of pine trees they seem to like.

The summer of 89 I worked at a summer camp in the deep woods of Canada. In the dining hall, where I also slept in the attic, there were lots of bats that lived between the logs supporting the roof. You could seem the moving about in their sleep and they would poop down below. Sometimes at night you could see them flying around the inside of the building. It freaked me out a bit at first, but I got used to it. That is about all I have to say about bats.

The question for the advanced readers is whether murciélago shares a common root with ciego (blind). I think I needn't say that it is a myth that bats are blind.

Ejemplo time.

Esta cueva es una casas de miles de murciélagos. = This cave is home to thousands of bats.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
WongBo
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June 24th, 2012 at 10:21:54 PM permalink
i liked your camp story, i had similar experiences with bats in vermont in the 70's.
just to clarify, bats are members of the order chiroptera, not rodentia!

i know about the lamborghini murcielago,
named after a famous Navarra bull, an interesting tale:
murcielago

Etymology
From metathetic murciégalo, from Latin mus (“mouse”) + caeculus, diminutive of caecus (“blind”).

a friend of mine from the phillipines, tells me
that the golden crowned flying fox has a wingspan of over 5 feet....
glad i didn't have those at summer camp!
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.

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