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Nareed
Nareed
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June 20th, 2012 at 10:17:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. In this case I don't necessarily admit defeat. If Nick is reading this; I retract my admission of being wrong. The argument shall go on!



If you behave, I'll get you a Loteria set for yout next birthday...
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Wizard
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June 21st, 2012 at 11:12:06 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

If you behave, I'll get you a Loteria set for yout next birthday...



Thanks, but I doubt I'll be able to behave.

Fecha: 21-06-12
Palabra: Rebozar


Today's SWD is another one that has no direct English equivalent. It means to be coated in batter or breadcrumbs.

The question for the experts in the cuisine of Latin America is what kind of food tends to be rebozada?

Ejemplo time.

¿Esta un perro caliente de maíz robozado en su pantalones, o sólo esta feliz a verme? = Is that a corn dog in your pants, or are you just happy to see me?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 21st, 2012 at 11:40:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks, but I doubt I'll be able to behave.



Did you make a bad bet?

Quote:

Today's SWD is another one that has no direct English equivalent. It means to be coated in batter or breadcrumbs.



I had to look it up. It does mean that. But (you know what's comming, don't you?), no one ever uses it in this country. If bread, or something like it (details later), isinvolved, then we say "empanizar." If there's no bread, then the word is "capear."

Quote:

The question for the experts in the cuisine of Latin America is what kind of food tends to be rebozada?



Way too much. A popular dish are milanesas, which are thin, flat cuts of veal, beef or chicken breast covered in egg and breadcrumbs and fried with enough oil to lubricate the Royal Navy twice over. A restaurnat near the office tried to introduce a "healthy" menu, so they began to offer broccoli and other vegetables, covered in egg and breadrumbs and fired with enough oil to lubricate the Royal Navy twice over...

Do you undertand why I began coooking all my meals?

Anyway, in the bread aisle in local supermarkets you'll find "pan molido" or breadcrumbs. Actually it's more nearly powdered bread. It's sold alongside "empanizadores," which include crumbs/near-powders amde with All Bran or Corn Flakes (sold by Kellogg's). there's something else called "salvado de trigo" which I gather is some form of baked, processed wheat bran, and is very popular for these kinds of dishes.

Needless to say, this kind of ingredient is not part of my repertoire. Though I've wondered if I can do a low-fat approximation. Maybe by using only egg whites and baking the milanesas rather than frying them. It's a thought.

Oh, "empanizadores" are not confined to milanesas, but that accounts for about 98% or so of their use.

Another popular disha re chiles rellenos. These are whole, mild poblano chiles, which are rather big, stuffed with cheese, tuna or beef, covered in egg and flour batter and fried with, for a wonder, only a little oil. I don't like them. They can be served like that, or with a sauce on top. A popualr variation is "Chiles en Nogada," which come with a pecan-based sauce and, for reasons best left unproved, pomegrante bits sprinkled on top (yuck!)


And that's what you get for asking a cooking question :P

Quote:

¿Esta un perro caliente de maíz robozado en su pantalones, o sólo esta feliz a verme? = Is that a corn dog in your pants, or are you just happy to see me?



Technically that's correct, but you can see it's way too much to follow. By the time you reach "en suS pantalones," you've probably lost itnerest. besides, no one in Mexico says "perro caliente," unless they are trying to make fun of the expression. We say <drumroll> "hot dogs." Though here that means the sausage in a bun, not the sausage itself.

You can find corn dogs for sale at the frozen foods section, but they aren't very popular. In any case, the batter used is very different, I think based more on flour than bread.

Anyway, what you want is a near-equivalent to a corn dog. There aren't many. But you can try "banderilla" that's a piece of cheese, suually, covered in batter, skewered on a stick and deep fried. They're a staple at japanese restaurants in mexico,a dn any middle-class Mexican would understand it that way.
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WongBo
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June 21st, 2012 at 1:19:19 PM permalink
any relation to rebozos, the shawls worn by many mexican women?
i think an alternative definition is "to cover or muffle"

or to charles 'bebe' rebozo, nixon's bagman?
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
pacomartin
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June 21st, 2012 at 3:11:24 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You can find corn dogs for sale at the frozen foods section, but they aren't very popular. In any case, the batter used is very different, I think based more on flour than bread.

Anyway, what you want is a near-equivalent to a corn dog. There aren't many. But you can try "banderilla" that's a piece of cheese, suually, covered in batter, skewered on a stick and deep fried. They're a staple at japanese restaurants in mexico,a dn any middle-class Mexican would understand it that way.



Wikipedia says that In Mexico, a corn dog is known as a banderilla


They also seem to be the implements they use in bullfighting.


Presumably any food on a stick could be called a banderilla in some Spanish speaking country.
Nareed
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June 21st, 2012 at 3:36:54 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Wikipedia says that In Mexico, a corn dog is known as a banderilla



Maybe. In the frozen food section, they're labeled as corn dogs.

The cheese "banderillas" in Japanese restaurants are usually called "Kashiuage," which may or may not be a legitimate Japanese term (I only know three words of Japanese). But they also sell sausage ones, which are close to corn dogs.

As food goes, the term is also used for a hard, layered pastry with a brown crust. Personally I find it too dry and too sweet for my taste, but some people like them.

Quote:

Presumably any food on a stick could be called a banderilla in some Spanish speaking country.



Maybe. In mexico it's just what I said here. Meat with vegetables on a skewer is called an "alambre" or "brocheta," as I'm sure I've already explained in a taco thread. Candy on a stick or frozen treats on a stick are called "paletas"
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 21st, 2012 at 3:46:33 PM permalink


Kushiage is a legitimate Japanese word. 'Kushi' means skewered and 'age' means deep-fried.

By the way, I don't like Japanese food in Mexico, except they do some wonderful unique spicy versions of rolls.
Wizard
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Wizard
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June 21st, 2012 at 10:39:37 PM permalink
Thanks for all the good information on Spanish cooking terms. No follow up from me on that.

Fecha: 22-06-12
Palabra: Pulga


Today's SWD means flea.

The question for the advanced readers is whether there is an etymology connection to these other words that begin with "pul."

pulgar = thumb.
pulmón = lung.
pulsera = bracelet.
pulpo = octopus.
pulgada = inch.

Ejemplo time.

Gracias a mi gato, mi casa está infestada de pulgas. = Thanks to my cat, my house is infested with fleas.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 22nd, 2012 at 12:23:38 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the advanced readers is whether there is an etymology connection to these other words that begin with "pul."



In English the Latin word 'pulsus' gives us 'pul' which usually means "urge". As in impulse, compulsive, propulsion, pulse, etc.

In Spanish
'pul' sometimes means 'manu' as a pulpo is 'many footed'
pollicaris is Latin for about the thumb. From this we get 'pulgar'
the word 'pulsera' is from of the 'pulse'

I don't see a unifying meaning, however.
Wizard
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June 23rd, 2012 at 9:29:40 AM permalink
Fecha: 23-06-12
Palabra: Cobrar


Today's SWD seems to have lots of usages, but the main one seems to be to collect/earn/be paid.

You may be wondering how cobrar differs from ganar. I think cobrar implies being paid for something you did, and ganar implies winning or falling into money.

Ejemplo time.

Una vez traté de ser un gigoló, pero nunca cobré mucho. = Once I tried to be a gigolo, but I never earned much.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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