Thread Rating:

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 17th, 2012 at 5:03:56 PM permalink
Your answer was correct WB on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Earlier today I went to the dry cleaners and noticed the cashier was named Lupe. This naturally led me to ask if she was named after the Virgin Guadalupe. This led to a conversation about naming customs in Mexico. She said that every day of the year has some name associated with it in Mexico, and it is very traditional there to name a baby according to the day he/she was born on. She then made a comment along the lines that you could often tell if someone was born in Mexico or not by whether his/her name corresponded to his/her birthday, as this custom is not much followed by Mexican-Americans.

Nareed, what is your take on this?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 17th, 2012 at 5:21:36 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Earlier today I went to the dry cleaners and noticed the cashier was named Lupe. This naturally led me to ask if she was named after the Virgin Guadalupe.



If you walk into a random subway station and throw a stone at the the throng, chances are good it will hit someone named Lupe.

Quote:

Nareed, what is your take on this?



That's a Catholic custom I know next to nothing about. Something to do with there being a saint for every day of the year for some reason.

I can tell you most people are named by reasons having to do with their parents tastes, choices and obligations. One more or less common custom is to name the first born son after the father.

For examples, i know a lot of Lupes, mostly women, but none as far as I know were born on December 12th.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 17th, 2012 at 8:43:01 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Earlier today I went to the dry cleaners and noticed the cashier was named Lupe. This naturally led me to ask if she was named after the Virgin Guadalupe.



Lupe and Lupita are both names from the Virgin Guadalupe. Also keep in mind that most Mexican Americans are from small cities and rural towns. Greater Mexico City is a giant magnet for internal immigration. Many times Mexican Americans talk about traditional culture, while Nareed isn't small town and wasn't even raised Catholic.

I've heard Lupe Ontiveros speak, who has worked for half a century in TV and movies. She reacts very strongly to people who find fault with her having plaid a maid between 150 and 300 times onscreen. She is very defensive about her portrayals. As she got older, she did get a greater variety of roles.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 17th, 2012 at 9:07:09 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

For examples, i know a lot of Lupes, mostly women, but none as far as I know were born on December 12th.



Thanks for the above. The Lupe at the dry cleaners said she was named after her grandmother, because she was born shortly after the grandmother died. I guess in the spirit of keeping the memory of the grandmother alive.

A bit off topic, but back in college a female friend of mine was engaged to an Mexican-American man (meaning American by citizenship but Mexican by race), but with deep family roots in Mexico. They set a wedding date a long time in advance, probably 6-12 months. However, the bride's grandmother died about two weeks before the wedding. I don't recall all the details, but it was strongly suggested by the family of the groom that the wedding be postponed, out of respect to the grandmother. However, the wedding was in the U.S., and big weddings here cost a fortune, and are not easily postponed. In the end, the wedding went out as scheduled. I think because the wife's family was paying for it. I hear it caused a lot of tension, but life must go on. Personally, I would have supported the decision to go on as planned, had I had anything to do with it. Life is for the living.

Fecha: 06-18-12
Palabra: Ruega


Today's SWD means request (noun). If you want the verb for to request the closest one in Spanish would probably be solicitar. The verb pedir, while generally translated as "to ask," seems to also have connotations of requesting. Ruega seems to come from the verb rogar, which means to beg.

However, I submit to the Acadamia Real Española that there is a difference between begging and requesting. The word for a request should not be based on the verb for beg. I request the Academia think this over.

Ejemplo time.

Puedo hacer una ruega que cuando jugamos Monopolio que jugamos con las reglas oficiales. = May I make a request that when we play Monopoly that we play by the official rules.

On that note, let me say that I can't stand it when people add their own rules to Monopoly. Don't even get me started on the "free parking"rule. There will be none of that crap if I'm playing. And don't request to be the hat either.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 17th, 2012 at 9:43:14 PM permalink
There seems to be "ruego" as a noun, but the noun "ruega" does not exist. Not all nouns have a masculine and feminine version.

Some of the conjugations of "rogar" are
ruego 1st person present
ruega 3rd person present
rogué 1st person preterite

The English word rogue may be related, as it implies a beggar who is always asking for money. Although that makes sense, the OED says there is no evidence of that etymology.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 18th, 2012 at 8:35:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means request (noun).



It can be used that way. The definition is ambiguous, as it says it means "súplica o petición."

So if in an airplane the stewardess says "rogamos a los pasajeros apagar sus teléfonos celulares," you may take that to mean it's a formal request.

Quote:

However, I submit to the Acadamia Real Española that there is a difference between begging and requesting. The word for a request should not be based on the verb for beg. I request the Academia think this over.



Absolutely. I use it as "beg" only. If I want to make a request I will go with "te pido...," or "le solicito...


Quote:

Puedo hacer una ruega que cuando jugamos Monopolio que jugamos con las reglas oficiales. = May I make a request that when we play Monopoly that we play by the official rules.



You're missing the question signs on both examples, aren't you?

Anyway, you do not "make" requests in Spanish with that word. So: "Les ruego que cuando juguemos Monopolio...."

Other than that you went too wordy witht he second part. So: "Les ruego que cuando juguemos Monopolio lo hagamos con las reglas oficiales."

Quote:

On that note, let me say that I can't stand it when people add their own rules to Monopoly. Don't even get me started on the "free parking"rule. There will be none of that crap if I'm playing. And don't request to be the hat either.



The official rules say properties are to be put up for auction if the player who lands on one doens't buy it, or eprhaps even if she does (I'm not sure). And free parking is the jackpot, isn't it? :)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 18th, 2012 at 9:53:55 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The official rules say properties are to be put up for auction if the player who lands on one doens't buy it, or eprhaps even if she does (I'm not sure). And free parking is the jackpot, isn't it? :)



Thanks for your comments on rogar. Yes, absolutely a property is put up for auction if the person who landed it on an unowned property declines to buy it. However, 95%+ of the time the player will invoke the right to buy, at least good players. This is a rule that is seldom actually followed though.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 18th, 2012 at 7:58:03 PM permalink
Fecha: 19-06-12
Palabra: alborotar


Today's SWD means to make a racket. The word for a racket (noun) is alboroto.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast alboroto y bulla.

Ejemplo time.

Gilligan, dejás alborotas; el Capitan está tratando de dormir. = Gilligan, quit making a racket, the Skipper is trying to sleep.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 18th, 2012 at 8:23:31 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for your comments on rogar. Yes, absolutely a property is put up for auction if the person who landed it on an unowned property declines to buy it. However, 95%+ of the time the player will invoke the right to buy, at least good players. This is a rule that is seldom actually followed though.



My strategy is to buy anything I land on, regardless of other considerations. Either I can use it or I can trade it. Or I can spoil someone.

But I've never done the auction thing when playing with people, even on a computer. I've done it when playing alone against the computer.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 18th, 2012 at 9:52:47 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast alboroto y bulla.



As a verb alborotar could also mean not just too agitate but also to cause joy.
As a verb bullir could mean to literally cause something to boil, but also to make people act like they are boiling.

============================
alborotar. (Quizá del lat. volūtare, agitar, cruzado con alborozar).
1. tr. Inquietar, alterar, conmover, perturbar.
2. tr. Amotinar, sublevar.
3. tr. encrespar (‖ las ondas del agua).
4. tr. p. us. Causar alegría.

alborozar (De alborozo).
1. tr. Causar extraordinario regocijo, placer o alegría.
2. tr. ant. Causar extraordinario desorden.

bullir. (Del lat. bullīre).
1. intr. Dicho del agua o de otro líquido: hervir (‖ producir burbujas por la acción del calor).
2. intr. Dicho de una cosa: Agitarse con movimiento parecido al del agua que hierve.
3. intr. Dicho de una masa de personas, animales u objetos: Agitarse a semejanza del agua hirviendo.
4. intr. Dicho de una persona: Moverse, agitarse con viveza excesiva, no parar, no estarse quieta en ninguna parte.
5. intr. Moverse como dando señal de vida. U. t. c. prnl.
6. intr. Dicho de cosas de una misma naturaleza: Ocurrir con frecuencia y actividad. Bullir las pláticas. Bullir las asonadas.
7. tr. mover (‖ menear). Don Quijote no bullía pie ni mano.
8. tr. ant. Revolver algo. Bullir una confección farmacéutica.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

  • Jump to: