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Nareed
Nareed
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June 6th, 2012 at 6:42:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks. I've always wondered about the difference between color y caliente.



"cAlor."

Quote:

According to the dictionary today's SWD means burst or explode. However, where I encountered the word it meant "annoy." At this point you may be saying to yourself, I thought that fastidiar already covered "annoy."



At this point I'm wondering whether that's Argentinian or Peruvian slang, actually. Because in Mexico the verb "reventar" is never used that way.

Quote:

Gilligan, no le reventas a el Profesor. Él está tratando de construir un submarino. = Gilligan, don't bother the Professor. He is trying to build a submarine.



"...no revientes aL Profesor..." The rest is ok.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 6th, 2012 at 6:52:55 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

At this point I'm wondering whether that's Argentinian or Peruvian slang, actually. Because in Mexico the verb "reventar" is never used that way.



This comes from the book I showed you. Here is the whole sentence, Una cosa que me revienta de los viajes de Rowley es cuando regresa de alguno siempre me lo restriega por la cara. I assume that to means, "One thing that annoys me about Rowley's trips is when he returns from somewhere he always rubs it in my face."
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Nareed
Nareed
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June 6th, 2012 at 7:06:42 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

This comes from the book I showed you. Here is the whole sentence, Una cosa que me revienta de los viajes de Rowley es cuando regresa de alguno siempre me lo restriega por la cara. I assume that to means, "One thing that annoys me about Rowley's trips is when he returns from somewhere he always rubs it in my face."



By local usage I would tranlsate it as "One thing I can't stand about..." or "One thing that really tears it about..."

I would take the original sentence to mean "One thing that blows me up," which of course doesn't make sense. And that's the reason the word "reventar" woulnd't be sued here in that sense, either. If I wanted to say "One thing that annoys me..." I would go with "Una cosa que me molesta..." or "Una cosa que no soporto..."
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pacomartin
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June 6th, 2012 at 7:30:31 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

This comes from the book I showed you. Here is the whole sentence, Una cosa que me revienta de los viajes de Rowley es cuando regresa de alguno siempre me lo restriega por la cara. I assume that to means, "One thing that annoys me about Rowley's trips is when he returns from somewhere he always rubs it in my face."



The RAE gives the word no less than NINE colloquial definitions, some very country specific.

Even the verb ventar can be difficult: (intransitive) to blow (transitive) to sniff, to scent

In general "reventar" is a stronger verb than "fastidiar". Obviously you have to translate the verb, but I would avoid using it since it has so many different regional meanings. In El Salvador it means "to liquidate", and in Nicaragua it means "to charge an excessive price". In Costa Rica it implies violence. You may say something you don't mean to say.


Conjugation Rule: 'e' becomes an 'ie' in stressed syllables. Other verbs that use the same stem change rule are:

reventar - violently crush
cerrar - to close
comenzar - to begin, commence
pensar - to think
defender - to defend
entender - to understand, comprehend
tender - to spread, extend, stretch out
convertir - to convert
hervir - to boil
preferir - to prefer

reventar
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 6th, 2012 at 12:17:41 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

"One thing that annoys me about Rowley's trips is when he returns from somewhere he always rubs it in my face."




Miles de simpatizantes y afiliados del PSUC encabezados por su secretario general A Raiumundo han intentado reventar la procesiòn catolica del dia del Corpus Christi en la localidad barcelonesa de Sitges.

I am curious as to the background of the translator of your book. In most cases that I have found, the verb is associated with a very strong violent reaction whic is much stronger than "annoy". In the above case the communist sympathizers "broke up" the Catholic procession.
Wizard
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Wizard
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June 6th, 2012 at 12:30:58 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I am curious as to the background of the translator of your book.



I don't know. Several times my tutor has remarked that the way he translated things was not how people talk in Peru. Nareed has been through some of it and perhaps can comment.

This is a bit off topic, but a part I read recently was about digging a hole in the ground. At first he used agujero several times. However, half way through that story line, he suddenly switched over to hoyo, using that several times. I wasn't sure if he was trying to make some point about the hole, or just changed his mind half way through about which term to use.

Quote:

In most cases that I have found, the verb is associated with a very strong violent reaction whic is much stronger than "annoy". In the above case the communist sympathizers "broke up" the Catholic procession.



In the story he was quite annoyed, so a stronger term was probably intended.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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June 6th, 2012 at 12:48:09 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I don't know. Several times my tutor has remarked that the way he translated things was not how people talk in Peru.



"Travesuras de la niña mala" (The Bad Girl, 2007) was written in Spanish first by a noted Peruvian author and member of the RAE. It might be a good example of a book to read which was written in Spanish first, and then translated into English .
Nareed
Nareed
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June 6th, 2012 at 1:21:24 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I don't know. Several times my tutor has remarked that the way he translated things was not how people talk in Peru. Nareed has been through some of it and perhaps can comment.



I didn't discern any clear tendencies.

Quote:

At first he used agujero several times. However, half way through that story line, he suddenly switched over to hoyo, using that several times.



As a pure guess, he realized he'd used a word too amny times, so he changed toa synonim. then he sued that too many times. Or it might have been "corrected" by an editor.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 7th, 2012 at 6:46:07 AM permalink
Fecha: 07-06-12
Palabra: Ojear


Today's SWD means glance. It should not be confused with ver, which means to see, and mirar, which means to look at.

Ejemplo time.

Jengibre fue a la laguna para ir a bañarse en cueros. Sin embargo, solo le ojeaba a ella. = Ginger went to the lagoon to go skinny-dipping. However, I only glanced at her.

Please spare me the lecture about translating names. I think Jengibre sounds like a nice name. Besides, Nareed said they call the Skipper Capitán.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 7th, 2012 at 6:52:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Jengibre fue a la laguna para ir a bañarse en cueros. Sin embargo, solo le ojeaba a ella. = Ginger went to the lagoon to go skinny-dipping. However, I only glanced at her.



The "ir" in the first sentence is redundant, since you arleady covered the action with "fue." And "Sin embargo, solo lA ojeaba..."

Quote:

Please spare me the lecture about translating names. I think Jengibre sounds like a nice name. Besides, Nareed said they call the Skipper Capitán.



Would you settle for an explanation? Aside from the Skipper and the Professor, no one else had their name translated in that show's dubbed version. Besides, "Skipper" is not a given name in this case, but a title. Titles can be translated.

Second, the word "jengibre" in Spanish is used solely as the name of a spice. So it would be like calling someone "Tarragon," "Dill," "Mustard," Sesame," "Thyme," "Cilantro," etc.
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