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Nareed
Nareed
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May 30th, 2012 at 7:08:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I don't dispute that, but Reverso says it also means "argue." In the context I found it, the word was used as a translation of argue.



I'm not disputing that. I merely said it also means "to discuss."

Ejemplo:

"Nos reunimos en el Pentágono para discutir estrategias." :)
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pacomartin
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May 30th, 2012 at 1:28:44 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I merely said it also means "to discuss."
Ejemplo: "Nos reunimos en el Pentágono para discutir estrategias." :)



It seems to me that a heated discussion is also an argument
English "discuss" comes from Latin "discutere" which means "to dash to pieces, agitate"
English "argue" comes from Latin "arguo" which means "show, prove, assert, declare, make clear, reprove, accuse, charge with, blame, censure, and denounce as false"

In Spanish the descendant verbs are discutir and argüir.

Quote: e Learn Spanish

La Diéresis - Ü
When the letter G precedes a U plus a hard vowel, the U and the vowel are both pronounced. The U is pronounced like an English W:
guasón
guapo

In order to obtain this W sound in front of a soft vowel, the Ü comes into play. The two dots over the U are called a dieresis and indicate that two adjacent vowels both need to be pronounced as a diphthong:
vergüenza
lingüística

Note: In Spanish, the dieresis is only found on the U, and it can only precede an E or I. When a U is followed by a hard vowel, as in guapo, the W sound is automatic. Remember that a U without dieresis + E or I just makes the G hard (lesson on hard/soft vowels); the dieresis is what indicates that the U has its own sound.



La Diéresis - Ü may be a feature of Castellano, and not of Latin American Spanish. Nareed will have to answer.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 30th, 2012 at 1:35:26 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

La Diéresis - Ü may be a feature of Castellano, and not of Latin American Spanish. Nareed will have to answer.



We use the dots over the U, as well. But it only applies when the consonant is G.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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May 30th, 2012 at 8:08:57 PM permalink
Fecha: 31-05-12
Palabra: Rompecabezas


No, today's SWD doesn't mean "broken heads," it means puzzle. Personally, as a lover of puzzles, I'm a little offended at this one. I would like to think of puzzles as something that strengthens the mind, not breaks it.

Something that puzzles me is that Rompecabezas is the word for a single puzzle. Kind of like dios is the word for one god. Would the word for multiple puzzles be Rompecabezases?

Unlike English, I don't think there is a word for "to puzzle" in Spanish. If you wanted to say "I'm puzzled," I think it would be Estoy perplejo.

Are you puzzled yet?

Ejemplo time.

Intenté resolver el rompecabezas Eternidad II para meses, pero yo falté. = I tried to solve the Enternity II puzzle for months, but I failed.

For further reading on the Eternity II puzzle, please visit my Nov 18, 2008 Ask the Wizard column.
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Nareed
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May 30th, 2012 at 8:21:59 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

No, today's SWD doesn't mean "broken heads," it means puzzle.



Close. It means "jigsaw puzzle," specifically. I can be used colloquially to mean "puzzle," but that's rather rare.

Quote:

Something that puzzles me is that Rompecabezas is the word for a single puzzle. Kind of like dios is the word for one god. Would the word for multiple puzzles be Rompecabezases?



No, the plural is "rompecabezas" as well. Whats' the plural for "analysis"?

Quote:

Unlike English, I don't think there is a word for "to puzzle" in Spanish.



That's right. There's no noun for "puzzle" in Spanish either. The funny thing is that there is a puzzle section in many newspapers, often with crossword puzzles and Sudoku. Usually they're called things like "divertimientos," "acertijos" or other things. "Acertijo" does not mean "puzzle," either. It means "riddle."

Quote:

Intenté resolver el rompecabezas Eternidad II para meses, pero yo falté. = I tried to solve the Enternity II puzzle for months, but I failed.



Meaning aside: "...Eternidad II POR meses, pero yo FALLÉ."
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pacomartin
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May 30th, 2012 at 9:06:47 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That's right. There's no noun for "puzzle" in Spanish either. The funny thing is that there is a puzzle section in many newspapers, often with crossword puzzles and Sudoku. Usually they're called things like "divertimientos," "acertijos" or other things. "Acertijo" does not mean "puzzle," either. It means "riddle."



The word "puzzle" is from an archaic sense meaning "high frequency".

If a puppy is "nuzzling" you, he is sticking his nose in your side repeatedly.
If someone is "puzzling" you, he is repeatedly posing many questions.
If you "guzzle" a drink you pour it repeatedly down your gullet.
If you "dazzle" someone you repeatedly put him in a daze.

The Old French word poser "put, place, propose," was a term used in debating, from Late Latin pausare "to halt, rest, pause". The word seems to have been influenced by Latin ponere which means "to place, to put, to lay".

So puzzle is related to Spanish pausar, and poner . But since the "-zzle" version of words is not from Latin, they were never used in Spanish.

------------
nuzzle was originally spelled as "nose +‎ -le"= nosle
puzzle was originally spelled as "pose +‎ -le" = pusle

I imagine the whole set of words can be a challenge to translate to Spanish. In English "grizzled" means having a lot of gray (gris is archaic)

puzzle
nuzzle
guzzle
dazzle
bedazzle
drizzle
embezzle
fizzle
frazzle
frizzle
grizzled
muzzle
nozzle
sizzle
swizzle
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 30th, 2012 at 9:07:03 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Close. It means "jigsaw puzzle," specifically. I can be used colloquially to mean "puzzle," but that's rather rare.



According to Reverso, that is correct, but it can also mean a general puzzle.

Quote:

Whats' the plural for "analysis"?



Analyses.

Please don't ask what is the plural of data, or data is the plural of what? I'll come right out and say that I'm referring to the word "datum," which is a word only perfectionists use when trying to correct people saying "data." Maybe it is different in Australia, South Africa, and England, but in the US nobody ever says "datum," except to pick arguments over semantics. If you were to ask me what English word I hate the most, offhand I can't think of anything I detest more than that one.

Quote:

FALLÉ."



What was wrong with falté? Which verb tense is fallé?
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Nareed
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May 30th, 2012 at 9:13:29 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Analyses.



Show-off ;P

Quote:

What was wrong with falté? Which verb tense is fallé?



"Falté" comes from "faltar" which means "to miss" as in when you miss an appointment. Then you'd say "falté a la cita." It also means you're missing something, for example "me hace falta jengibre para completar la receta."

"Fallé" comes from "fallar," which does mean "to fail."
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pacomartin
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May 30th, 2012 at 9:20:58 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'll come right out and say that I'm referring to the word "datum," which is a word only perfectionists use when trying to correct people saying "data." Maybe it is different in Australia, South Africa, and England, but in the US nobody ever says "datum," except to pick arguments over semantics.



We used to use "datum" in the sense of geodesy, where we were referring to coordinates of an enemy target. The dark humor phrase "flaming datum" was commonly used in WWII for the position of an German submarine determined because one of our ships was going down in flames.
Wizard
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May 31st, 2012 at 6:15:46 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

We used to use "datum" in the sense of geodesy, where we were referring to coordinates of an enemy target.



This is the first legitimate usage of the word I've ever heard. Still, I would have just said "coordinates."

So, what is the story behind calling a puzzle, or a crossword, a head breaker?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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