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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 26th, 2012 at 7:51:16 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The sign reads "This Way To The EGRESS".
A sign wouldn't say that. Instead you'd see a sign saying "Salida" with an arrow pointing the way.





You missed my point. The story was that PT Barnum was offering admission to his museum of oddities without a time limit. But the problem is that once people paid the admission they would linger for long periods of time crowding the place and he was losing money. So he had the bright idea of putting up the sign. He knew that many people would not recognize the word, and would follow the sign looking for the next display. They would find themselves outside the museum.


It's a well-known bit of Americana, and is often used as a metaphor for schemes that take advantage of general ignorance to make money.

Another famous quote, that is often mistakenly attributed to PT Barnum is below

NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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May 26th, 2012 at 8:25:08 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In that poster above they drew the die on the right incorrectly. The dots on the 2 should be in the other two corners.

Fecha: 26-05-12
Palabra: Rezar


Today's SWD means to pray. It can also mean to read, go, or grumble. A related word is rezo, which means a prayer.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast rezar y orar.

Ejemplo time.

¿Qué es la diferencia entre la rezar en la iglesia y la rezar en un casino?

Please answer in Spanish.



Rezar es repetir una frase una linea, de memoria o de un libro de pregas; Orar es hablar con Dios casi por una conversacion.
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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May 26th, 2012 at 8:30:02 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Word play just doesn't travel well.



Except with mun2 for "mundos".
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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May 26th, 2012 at 8:33:11 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Quote: Nareed

The sign reads "This Way To The EGRESS".
A sign wouldn't say that. Instead you'd see a sign saying "Salida" with an arrow pointing the way.





You missed my point. The story was that PT Barnum was offering admission to his museum of oddities without a time limit. But the problem is that once people paid the admission they would linger for long periods of time crowding the place and he was losing money. So he had the bright idea of putting up the sign. He knew that many people would not recognize the word, and would follow the sign looking for the next display. They would find themselves outside the museum.


It's a well-known bit of Americana, and is often used as a metaphor for schemes that take advantage of general ignorance to make money.

Another famous quote, that is often mistakenly attributed to PT Barnum is below



Another one is, "There's a sucker born every minute!", although I no longer remember who it was exactly who said it first. Maybe De Toqueville? (LOL).
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 26th, 2012 at 9:13:33 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

Years ago, my wife and older son, who was barely two years old at the time, had been visiting my in-laws for a few days ahead of my arrival. The in-laws had a sign with their name on it hanging from a couple of rusty eye hooks under their mailbox out at the street. When I got there, my son, who was building his vocabulary, pointed to it and said, "Sign!" I replied, "Yes, and do you know what the sign says?" His reply: "Squeek, squeek, squeek."

It's a real pain being shown up by a two year old.



English is almost unique of all languages in the world in that the word for "understanding the meaning of written symbols" is derived from an Anglo Saxon word that means " to explain or to advise", i.e. rædan.

Most languages (including Romance languages) use a word rooted in the idea of "gather up" as their word for the concept of the English word "read" . The Latin word lego which means to "gather up, to collect, to bring together" is the ancestor of Spanish leer and French lire. A related Greek word is λέγω. The same word is at the root of the name of the childrens toy blocks.

I think that is the core of the conflict between an English speaker casually going back and forth between the "sign says" or the "sign reads". Whereas the speaker of a Romance language would never use "leer" (Spanish) or "lire" (French) or "leggere" (Italian) or "ler" (Portuguese). They would always use "dice".
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 26th, 2012 at 9:57:15 AM permalink
Quote: NowTheSerpent

Rezar es repetir una frase una linea, de memoria o de un libro de pregas; Orar es hablar con Dios casi por una conversacion.



Thanks! I suppose one would reza in a Catholic church, and ora in a Protestant one (except the Lutherans).
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 26th, 2012 at 10:31:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Quote: NowTheSerpent

Rezar es repetir una frase una linea, de memoria o de un libro de pregas; Orar es hablar con Dios casi por una conversacion.



Thanks! I suppose one would reza in a Catholic church, and ora in a Protestant one (except the Lutherans).



A lot of Protestant religions (including boy scouts) use responsive readings where the entire conversation is scripted.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 26th, 2012 at 10:36:06 AM permalink
Quote: NowTheSerpent

Another one is, "There's a sucker born every minute!", although I no longer remember who it was exactly who said it first. Maybe De Toqueville? (LOL).



No one knows who said that phrase first. It was credited to PT Barnum, but there is no evidence that it was accurate. Barnum himself never denied the quote, as it got him a lot of publicity.

Tocqueville jokes are not widely understood, so most people won't LOL.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 26th, 2012 at 6:05:48 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

You missed my point. The story was that PT Barnum was offering admission to his museum of oddities without a time limit.



Oh, yes. I am familiar with the story. I just didn't remember it.

You could put up a sign that said "Egreso por aquí," with an arrow pointing the way.

But chances are most people will know what it means. When you refer to the school someone graduated from, a common way is to say "Es egresada del Tec de Monterrey." It's as common as saying "Es graduada del Tec..." or "Se graduó del Tec.."

Then again, "No one ever went broke underestimating the ignorance of humanity," Nareed, 2012 :P
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 27th, 2012 at 6:24:12 AM permalink
Fecha: 27-05-12
Palabra: Arrastrar


Today's SWD means to drag, as in to pull or tow. It can also have mean to take something along not necessarily intended/wanted.

Arrastrar should not be confused with dragar, which means to dredge.

The question for the advanced readers is whether there is a connection between arrastrar and the English "arrest," which might be like dragging someone to jail.

Ejemplo time.

La última 1.6 kilómetros del maratón tuve que arrastrarme a la línea de terminar. = The last mile of the marathon I had to drag myself to the finish line.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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