Thread Rating:

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1398
  • Posts: 23612
May 9th, 2012 at 4:36:08 PM permalink
Qué interesante. However, in every auction I've been to that used a hammer it was used only to close the bidding for an item. Once the hammer hit the podium the item was sold. Yet in the cheap auctions I tend to attend the auctioneer is holding whatever is being bid on, so he doesn't have a spare hand for a hammer, in which case he just says "sold."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1398
  • Posts: 23612
May 11th, 2012 at 6:22:58 AM permalink
Yesterday I had dinner at the Mexican restaurant at the Palms. They were running a happy your with $0.99 tacos and margaritas. The signage for this promotion said Me gusta tacos y margaritas. The hostess looked like she spoke Spanish, which she did. So I told her that it should be Me gustAN tacos y margaritas, because gustar is conjugated based on what is being liked, not who is liking it.

She disagreed, saying gusta is correct. After some debate I asked, "How would I say "I like tables" in Spanish? She said Me gustan las mesas. I said "I agree, so why it gusta if I like tacos?" She said "It just is."

Is she right? If so, can anyone explain the rule of grammar at play?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
aluisio
aluisio
Joined: Sep 15, 2010
  • Threads: 19
  • Posts: 293
May 11th, 2012 at 6:43:34 AM permalink
I must go with you on this one Mike. You are right, the verb gustar always is conjugated in accordance to the object. In this case, when there is more than one object, the verb changes to gustan.
In another example: Me gusta comer tacos y burritos. Now you have one object, comer.
Got it?
No bounce, no play.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1398
  • Posts: 23612
May 11th, 2012 at 8:18:45 AM permalink
Thanks, aluisio. I'll also ask Nareed about this on Saturday. I wonder if the hostess thinks that it is gusta because the comer is implied. Another possibility is that nobody ever buys/eats just one taco, and they always come in groups. For example, how would you say "I like beans."?

A) Me gusta los frijoles.
B) Me gustan los frijoles.

For what it is worth, translate.google.com went with A.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 11th, 2012 at 10:53:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks, aluisio. I'll also ask Nareed about this on Saturday. I wonder if the hostess thinks that it is gusta because the comer is implied.



It's a good question.

I received this opinion on the Spanish language forums.
  • The ad is bilingual; the only thing in Spanish is the phrase "me gusta".
  • In this context, one can think of "the situation" (having inexpensive food and drink) as the subject, and "the situation" is naturally singular.

    Another native speaker said that possibly in the context the advertisement should be read "I like that!". Then the rest is in English.



    I don't know why this picture would be singular, unless it was not written by a native speaker.


    With regard to your question about google and the beans, I have no idea why that would be singular.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1398
  • Posts: 23612
May 11th, 2012 at 8:45:02 PM permalink
Progress report on the taco question.

I went to Lowes today and the cashier spoke Spanish, so I asked her about it. She said Me gusta tacos. She may have included a los; I don't remember. So I proceeded to lecture her on gustar and why it should be gustan. She seemed easy to persuade because she easily agreed with me, and switch to gustan. I think she was just trying to get rid of me, and would have said anything. So I don't put a lot of stock in her opinion.

Later I went to the Red Rock buffet and my server also spoke Spanish. I asked the same question and he also said gusta. So we went back and forth for a while. To make a long story short, I think his position was that if you're not referring to specific tacos, but the idea of tacos in general, then people would tend to say gusta. I asked him for a rule of Spanish to justify that but basically said, "That is just how people talk." Of course, that answer is so unsatisfying.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1398
  • Posts: 23612
May 12th, 2012 at 5:49:40 PM permalink
Yet another progress report. Both Nareed and my tutor say that gustan is correct.

Nareed suggested the Palms ad may have referred to the restaurant, and my tutor suggested it might have referred to the girl.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
jmurillo74
jmurillo74
Joined: Mar 8, 2011
  • Threads: 5
  • Posts: 23
May 12th, 2012 at 5:58:08 PM permalink
How do you say marshmellows in spanish? Guys at work told me "pedos de monja" or "farts from a nun". Thought that one was funny.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 12th, 2012 at 6:20:34 PM permalink
Quote: jmurillo74

How do you say marshmellows in spanish? Guys at work told me "pedos de monja" or "farts from a nun". Thought that one was funny.





Malvavisco or bombón is also common. In English a bonbon is simply a way of saying "good good" in French. Usually it is associated with chocolate in English.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 13th, 2012 at 7:15:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Is she right? If so, can anyone explain the rule of grammar at play?



I looked through some examples on the Spanish corpus, and it is my best guess that it is just sloppy grammar. The phrase me gusta is listed in the urban dictionary as a slang phrase, similar to me like in English. If it is vague about what you like, "the girl", "the situation", "to eat", etc. the singular is often used.

Since "Me gustan el café y la leche" and "Me gusta café con leche" are both proper Spanish, I think people just run them together.

The "me gusta" moon

  • Jump to: