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Wizard
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Wizard 
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May 2nd, 2012 at 8:12:11 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

When ordering someone to sit down, you'd say "¡sientate!"



Thanks. When I worked in the Huntington Park Social Security office (99% Hispanic) I overheard the service representatives says sientase all day long. However, I always thought it was two words, sienta se.

However, what is wrong with my espabile? Since Paco is the go-to hombre for verb tenses I'll hit that ball into his court.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 2nd, 2012 at 8:14:52 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I can't remember how to google search for a specific page. Someone showed us how at one point, but I can't remember. The Search engine on the WOV site only find the thread.



It's ahrder than it used to be, as Google no longer has a link for "advanced searh" in its home apge.

So what you do is enter a search term and hit enter. Ignore the results and go to the bottom of the page to look for the "advanced search" link. Click it. The terms of the search remain, then look for the square to input a domain name. Type www.wizardofvegas.com, and click on the "Advanced Search" button.

That's all there is to it.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
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May 2nd, 2012 at 8:22:05 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks. When I worked in the Huntington Park Social Security office (99% Hispanic) I overheard the service representatives says sientase all day long. However, I always thought it was two words, sienta se.



Most likely you heard "siéntEse." Becasue "siéntAse" would mean "fell yourself," rather than "sit down"

Quote:

However, what is wrong with my espabile? Since Paco is the go-to hombre for verb tenses I'll hit that ball into his court.



I'm not so sure it's wrong, but I wouldn't use it that way in an imperative mode.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard 
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May 2nd, 2012 at 8:24:32 AM permalink
Here is how you would do it. Just do a normal search and put in: site:wizardofvegas.com espabilar

It will give you a link to the exact post. In this case it goes to the one today and the one two months ago.

I swear I tried to do this, but probably put in wizardofodds in error. My fingers are faster than my brain sometimes. Many times I have not posted duplicate words because this method of searching turned up the fact that we already covered the word. However, it is only the times you screw up that anyone notices.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 2nd, 2012 at 8:32:29 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Dico" is the name of a furniture store, "Mmuebles Dico." "DiGo" means "I say." "Hablo" means "I talk," or "I speak"
It's done all the time: Cállate, Siéntate, Déjame, Suéltame, etc etc.



Pretty stupid of me. I am starting to forget things from my classwork.

Does "Suéltame" mean "let go of me" or does it mean "loosen up"? I think the accent changes the meaning.

For instance the title of this song :Sueltame Las Riendas is translated as "Let go of my reins".
Nareed
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May 2nd, 2012 at 8:39:55 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Does "Suéltame" mean "let go of me" or does it mean "loosen up"? I think the accent changes the meaning.



Let go of me, or let me go.

Quote:

For instance the title of this song :Sueltame Las Riendas is translated as "Let go of my reins".



In this case it may mean "let me have the reins," it depends on the song's context. But the word used by itself means "let me go"
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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May 2nd, 2012 at 11:06:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I swear I tried to do this, but probably put in wizardofodds in error. My fingers are faster than my brain sometimes. Many times I have not posted duplicate words because this method of searching turned up the fact that we already covered the word. However, it is only the times you screw up that anyone notices.



Well your selection of words is eclectic. It would be like choosing English words out the following list. The list was chosen because the words are evocative, not because they are common or even particularly useful. Some are so obscure that most people that are not SCRABBLE fiends would have to look them up.

Chatoyant, Diffuse, Effervescent, Encomium, Ephemeral, Epiphany, Evanescent, Gossamer, Halcyon, Languor, Lassitude, Lilt, Luxuriate, Nebulous, Panacea, Penumbra, Peregrination, Petrichor, Plethora, Scintillate, Serendipity, Susurrus, Symbiosis, Terpsichorean. Tintinnabulation
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 2nd, 2012 at 11:29:58 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote: Wizard

Thanks. When I worked in the Huntington Park Social Security office (99% Hispanic) I overheard the service representatives says sientase all day long. However, I always thought it was two words, sienta se.



Most likely you heard "siéntEse." Becasue "siéntAse" would mean "fell yourself," rather than "sit down"





One is the imperative conjugation of sentir (to feel). In this advertisement, the woman's doctor is saying Feel better!

The verb, "to sit down" is sentarse
============

I have always found these common verbs somewhat confusing. Their conjugated forms tend to look like each other.
The usual English translations are:
sentar: to sit | sentarse: to sit down
sentir: to feel |sentirse: to feel (well, ill)
Wizard
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Wizard 
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May 2nd, 2012 at 11:23:14 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Well your selection of words is eclectic. It would be like choosing English words out the following list ...
Chatoyant, Diffuse, Effervescent, Encomium, Ephemeral, Epiphany, Evanescent, Gossamer, Halcyon, Languor, Lassitude, Lilt, Luxuriate, Nebulous, Panacea, Penumbra, Peregrination, Petrichor, Plethora, Scintillate, Serendipity, Susurrus, Symbiosis, Terpsichorean. Tintinnabulation



There are some useful English words in that list. I'm all in favor of adding useful words to my English. Some of those on your list that I like to use when the opportunity comes up are: Effervescent, Epiphany, and Panacea. A word my father liked, that I never hear anyone else ever say, is perfunctory. He liked to use it in situations where somebody was doing something for appearances only, and not putting in a good effort. Perhaps an "English word of the day" would be a useful thread, but I'm not going to initiate it.

Anyway, back to Español. I'd like to think my choice of Spanish words is more down to earth than those above. They are just words I come across that I didn't previously know, and I think are either interesting and/or useful.

Fecha: 3-5-12
Palabra: Tiritar


Today's SWD means shiver (verb). A related word is tiritón, which is shiver as a noun. Another word for shiver (noun) is escalofrío.

I think the difference is that tiritón means to shiver with cold, and escalofrío with fear. That is odd because the latter has frío in it. Perhaps the advanced readers can clarify.

Ejemplo time.

No acaparas la manta; estoy tiritando. = Don't hog the blanket, I'm shivering.

I really wanted to try to use the imperative again, but my attempt evidently crashed and burned yesterday, so I'll play it safe and go with the present tense.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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May 3rd, 2012 at 4:52:42 AM permalink
I think a Misused English Word of the Day might be interesting.

As for "tiritón means to shiver with cold, and escalofrío with fear", it looks correct, but I can't explain why the latter word has frío.
BTW, frío also means "I fry".

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