Thread Rating:

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
April 27th, 2012 at 12:41:31 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"ME empapé en Splash Mountain en DisneylandIA." Disney land does ahve a Spanish translation, of sorts. the rides themselves don't.



I don't do this often on you, but I'm going to have throw the challenge flag, gently. I'm referring to DisneylandIA.

Check out the Spanish version of the Disneyland web site. It just says "Parque Disneyland."

The prosecution rests.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 27th, 2012 at 1:23:11 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I don't do this often on you, but I'm going to have throw the challenge flag, gently. I'm referring to DisneylandIA.

Check out the Spanish version of the Disneyland web site. It just says "Parque Disneyland."

The prosecution rests.



No doubt. But I'm talking about popular usage. Down here, all Disneyland parks are known as DisneylandIA. It's only natural, given such types of names already exist, for example "Finlandia." I know people who claim "fuimos a Disneylandia en Orlando," for instance, when that park isn't even named "Disneyland."

So the charges are summarily dismissed with prejudice. You cannot refile ;)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 27th, 2012 at 1:56:08 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I know people who claim "fuimos a Disneylandia en Orlando," for instance, when that park isn't even named "Disneyland."




It looks like the don't translate the name on their website at all.

In Oaxaca they had a park that was labelled Parque Juárez on all the maps and guidebooks. But the localls all call it El Llano and many don't even know it has another name.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
April 27th, 2012 at 2:40:27 PM permalink
In case anyone else is wondering, faire la nouba is French for "to live it up." I have no idea what the Nouba means by itself. Who is the board's go-to person on French?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 27th, 2012 at 3:25:15 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In case anyone else is wondering, faire la nouba is French for "to live it up." I have no idea what the Nouba means by itself. Who is the board's go-to person on French?



Not me.

But by context and sound similarities, I'm guessing it either means "cloud" or "new." I'm guessing I'm wrong, too, as French is really weird.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
April 28th, 2012 at 4:29:22 AM permalink
Fecha: 28-04-12
Palabra: adjudicar


Today's SWD means to award or win (a prize). A related word is premio, which mean an award (noun).

It seems to me that adjudicar is a nice clean word, with just the one meaning, and no sinónimos that I know of. So the advanced readers are off the hook today.

Ejemplo time.

Los Jueces le adjudicé a Eli Manning el premio Jugador Mas Valioso en el Tazón Grande de nuevo. = The judges awarded Eli Manning the Most Valuable Player award in the Super Bowl again.

I'm about 99.54% sure that I'm supposed to say "Super Bowl," but after Disneylandia I'm going with Tazón Grande anyway. Actually, on Univision and Telemundo I know they say "Super Bowl," so I'm just being bad.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 28th, 2012 at 5:06:46 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to award or win. A related word is premio, which mean an award (noun).



Kind of. The meaning is closer to the English "adjudicate." It doesn't mean to win, but to award a win, prize, settlement, etc.

Quote:

Los Jueces le adjudicé a Eli Manning el premio Jugador Mas Valioso en el Tazón Grande de nuevo. = The judges awarded Eli Manning the Most Valuable Player award in the Super Bowl again.



"los jueces le adjudiCARON a Eli Mannin el premio DE Jugador...."

Quote:

I'm about 99.54% sure that I'm supposed to say "Super Bowl," but after Disneylandia I'm going with Tazón Grande anyway.



Close. If you want a translation, and some Football broadcasters and writers use it, it's Super Tazón.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
April 28th, 2012 at 8:21:25 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

adjudiCARON



Uh. I should have got that. Originally I had "the judge," but then thought there is probably more than one person show judges MVP, so made it plural. I forgot to change the verb. Nevertheless, please add 10 push-ups to my balance.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 28th, 2012 at 10:10:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Uh. I should have got that. Originally I had "the judge," but then thought there is probably more than one person show judges MVP, so made it plural. I forgot to change the verb. Nevertheless, please add 10 push-ups to my balance.



If it had been one judge, then it would be "El juez adjudiCÓ a Eli...."

I forgot to remind you that when you a "c" precedes "e" or "i", it sounds like an "s" (quirk of the language). So the past tense of "adjudicar" in first person is "adjudiquÉ."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 28th, 2012 at 8:10:41 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I forgot to remind you that when you a "c" precedes "e" or "i", it sounds like an "s" (quirk of the language). So the past tense of "adjudicar" in first person is "adjudiquÉ."



In Castillian it sounds closer to a 'z'.

In general when you do a spelling change to preserve standard pronounciation it is called an orthographic irregularity.

Like replacing a "c" with a "qu" to keep the hard sound.
Like adding a "z" in the first person present indicative of conocer to get "conozco" (instead of simply removing the two letter ending and adding an "o")

There are at least a dozen "orthographic irregularities".

Saying "frito" instead of "friendo" is clearly not just an orthographic change.

  • Jump to: