Thread Rating:

miplet
miplet
Joined: Dec 1, 2009
  • Threads: 5
  • Posts: 1974
April 22nd, 2012 at 8:45:34 AM permalink
Quote: Doc


How do you say "Quaaaaaack!" in Spanish with a Gilbert Gottfried accent?


¡Cuac cuac!
“Man Babes” #AxelFabulous
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 22nd, 2012 at 8:59:25 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

regarding "kick the can": I thought it meant to procrastinate. In other words, put off dealing with a problem until later. You know you have to pick up the can eventually, but as long as you have to walk down the road, you can keep kicking it until you get to where your destination.



Actually, you are correct. I gave a bad definition for the idiom. The idiom "carry the can", may have come from "carry the keg" or an unwanted military duty of having to both carry the full kegs to the party, and carry the empty ones back after everyone is drunk.

It is possible that the closest English idiom to "pagar el pato" is to "be left holding the bag", as one person takes the blame and the punishment for the entire group's behavior.

But I still can't figure out where the Spanish idiom came from.

In English the duck goes into a store and buys a bunch of things, and says "put it on my bill". But that doesn't work in Spanish since there is not the word for a bar bill is "la cuenta" and the word for a duck bill is "pico de pato".
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 22nd, 2012 at 1:07:16 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for your help. Nice of you to give Nareed the day off.



Almost.

I went shopping. I can't believe how hard it is to find three different skirts...

Anyway, "traicionar" means "to betray." "Delatar" means to tell on someone. The latter is not necessarily a betrayal. And betrayal is not confined to giving up a partner in crime, broadly speaking. Someone who betrays his country is a "traidor."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
April 22nd, 2012 at 8:13:33 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Anyway, "traicionar" means "to betray." "Delatar" means to tell on someone. The latter is not necessarily a betrayal. And betrayal is not confined to giving up a partner in crime, broadly speaking. Someone who betrays his country is a "traidor."



Thanks. Good stuff!

Quick question. How would you translate this, El libro me trae por la calle de la amargura.?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 22nd, 2012 at 8:27:01 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks. Good stuff!



You're welcome

Quote:

Quick question. How would you translate this, El libro me trae por la calle de la amargura.?



Not easily. :)

It means the book is causing you to feel anguish. The literal translation is "the street of bitterness," but as you can see that's not what it's supposed to mean. I can't think of an equivalent English expression offhand.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
April 22nd, 2012 at 8:33:50 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

RE: El libro me trae por la calle de la amargura.?

It means the book is causing you to feel anguish. The literal translation is "the street of bitterness," but as you can see that's not what it's supposed to mean. I can't think of an equivalent English expression offhand.



Is there only a street of bitterness, or can the figure of speech be applied to any emotion?

I submit something similar in English is "memory lane." For example, if two long-lost friends meet, and talk about old times, it might be referred to as "taking a trip down memory lane." There are no other lanes, just memory lane.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
WongBo
WongBo
Joined: Feb 3, 2012
  • Threads: 62
  • Posts: 2126
April 22nd, 2012 at 8:48:51 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

There are no other lanes, just memory lane.


What about life in the fast lane...

la vida en el carril rápido o
la vida en el carril de alta velocidad ?
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
April 22nd, 2012 at 9:34:31 PM permalink
Quote: WongBo

What about life in the fast lane...



Well, I guess that is a lane too.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
April 22nd, 2012 at 10:11:27 PM permalink
Fecha: 04-23-12
Palabra: Aparcamiento


Today's SWD means "parking lot."

My previous tutor never missed an opportunity to complain about how terribly Spanish is spoken in Las Vegas. She would never refer to it as "Spanglish," because I think she would say it was not deserving of a term. Probably for the same reason most people, including me, refer to "ebonics" only in a mocking way.

One word that annoyed her in particular was aparcamiento. She said this was an Anglified Spanish word meaning "parking lot." Note the "parc" in the middle of it. She said the proper Spanish word was estacionamiento. You would be warned that if you ever meet her, never say aparcamiento, lest she lose all respect for your command of the language.

So, in the book I'm reading I just came across the word aparcamiento. I was quite shocked! The translated version is by oceano.mx, which looks like a respectable publishing company out of Mexico City.

So, the question for the native speakers is which term do you prefer, and why.

Ejemplo time.

Encontré mi jardinero en aparcamiento de el Almacén de Casa. = I found my landscaper in the parking lot of the Home Depot.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 23rd, 2012 at 1:38:42 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The Wizard asked me to take over these daily posts for a while.

Fecha: 28 de Mayo
Palbara del día: Estacionamiento


English makes a distinction between parking lots and parking garages. Spanish does not. Any structure, lot or space meant for the purposes of parking cars, buses and/or trucks is called "Estacionamiento."

Examples:

"El restaurante no tiene estacionamiento" = "The restaurant doesn't provide parking facilities."

"El periferico del DF es el estacionamiento más grande del mundo" = "Mexico City's freeway is the world's biggest parking lot."

I'll try something more complicated tomorrow.



Nareed brought up this word in May while you were away. We had a long discussion about it.

Quote: Doc

All riiiiight! If you come up with enough words like this, I might actually learn a little bit of "Spanish". One of the few words I remember from my French lessons many years ago is "le parking", meaning a spot in los estacionamiento.





Quote: Wizard

Well, I guess that is a lane too.


Don't forget about the primrose path from Hamlet.

  • Jump to: