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Nareed
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April 18th, 2012 at 2:14:28 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Is this sentence correct?
Me aloca cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos.



That one's fine.
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Wizard
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April 19th, 2012 at 6:19:00 AM permalink
Fecha: 04-19-12
Palabra: plis-plas


It was hard to find a dictionary that had this one, but wordreference.com says it means "instant" or "moment."

The question for the advanced readers is how does plis-plas differ from instante y momento?

Ejemplo time.

Dije "¿Quieres tomar algo?," pero ella dijo "no" en un plis-plas. = I said "Would you like something to drink?," but she said "no" in an instant.
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Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 6:24:20 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It was hard to find a dictionary that had this one, but wordreference.com says it means "instant" or "moment."



I think that's a non-word, like "plop-plop, fizz-fizz." It means something, but it isn't formally part of the language.

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is how does plis-plas differ from instante y momento?



Well, "instante" means "instant" and "momento" means "moment." They mean pretty much the same thing as they do in English.

Quote:

Dije "¿Quieres tomar algo?," pero ella dijo "no" en un plis-plas. = I said "Would you like something to drink?," but she said "no" in an instant.



Seems all ok to me.
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Wizard
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April 19th, 2012 at 6:32:13 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I think that's a non-word, like "plop-plop, fizz-fizz." It means something, but it isn't formally part of the language.



Oh what a relief it is! I doubt anyone under the age of 40 in the U.S. is familiar with that expression, and everyone over 40 can never forget it.

We all know where that comes from, but how about plis-plas? Paco, I think this one is for you.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 7:08:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Oh what a relief it is! I doubt anyone under the age of 40 in the U.S. is familiar with that expression, and everyone over 40 can never forget it.

We all know where that comes from, but how about plis-plas? Paco, I think this one is for you.



Onomatopoeia is the use of words that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to such as: hiss, murmur,buzz, beep, whirr, click, clack, clunk, clatter, clink, boing, varoom/vroom, whoosh, swish, swoosh, zap, zing, zip, and zoom.

The following list shows the sounds made by various "Spanish-speaking" animals. Special verb forms, where they exist, are in parenthesis following the word(s) for the sound. English forms follow the dash:

abeja (bee): bzzz (zumbar) buzz
búho (owl): uu uu (ulular) who, hoo, hoot
burro (donkey): iii-aah (rebuznar) heehaw
caballo (horse): jiiiiiii, iiiiou (relinchar) neigh, n-a-a-a-y
cabra (goat): bee bee (balar) b-a-a-a-a
cerdo (pig): oink-oink, oinc-oinc (grunir) oink
cuco (cuckoo): cúcu-cúcu cuckoo
cuervo (crow): cruaaac-cruaaac caw
gallina (hen): coc co co coc (cacarear), kara-kara-kara-kara cluck
gallo (rooster): kikirikí, ki-kiri-ki (cantar) cock-a-doodle-doo
gato (cat): miau (maullar) meow
león (lion): grrrr, grgrgr (rugir) roar, growl
oveja (sheep): bee, mee (balar) b-a-a-a-h
mono (monkey): i-i-i
paloma (dove): cu-curru-cu-cú (arrullar)) coo
pato (duck): cuac cuac quack
pavo (turkey): gluglú gobble
perro (dog): guau guau, guau (ladrar) bark, bow-wow, arf, ruff
pollito (chick): pío pío chirp
rana (frog): cruá cruá, berp, croac (croar) ribbit, croak
tigre (tiger): ggggrrrr, grgrgr (rugir) roar, growl
vaca (cow): mu, muuu (mugir) moo

The phrase "en un plis plas" figuratively means the same as "in the blink of an eye".

Frankly, the etymology of such words is difficult too trace in any language. Words like "moo" are first recorded almost 5 centuries ago, but etymologists simply say they are imitative.


[
Wizard
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April 19th, 2012 at 7:31:36 AM permalink
So, I assume because one could say "plis-plas" fast that it refers to as long as it takes to say it. Kind of like how every Jib Jab video starts with them saying "jib jab" quickly.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 8:52:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, I assume because one could say "plis-plas" fast that it refers to as long as it takes to say it.



It sound reasonable, but I can't confirm.

In English yum yum
In Spanish, ñam ñam

In English, thump thump
In Spanish, bum bum bum

In English hush, shh
In Spanish chitón cht

In English: mwah, smooch
In Spanish, mua or muac, chuik (South America)

In English, hahah, heh heh, hohoho, (tee)heehee
In Spanish, jajaja, jejeje

In English, honk honk, beep beep, toot toot
In Spanish, pi pi, pip pip

In English, knock knock
In Spanish, toc toc


God be with ye (late 14c.)
godbwye (1570s)
good-bye (1590s)
bye ?
bye-bye (1790)
buh-bye ?
Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 9:59:41 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Oh what a relief it is! I doubt anyone under the age of 40 in the U.S. is familiar with that expression, and everyone over 40 can never forget it.



Remind me to use "ka ching" next time :)

Seriously, I don't know where I got that from. I take it there was an ad, but I don't recall seeing it.

Quote:

We all know where that comes from, but how about plis-plas? Paco, I think this one is for you.



I don't think it's onomatopeia. I'd never come across it before.
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pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 10:18:57 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I don't think it's onomatopeia. I'd never come across it before.



Onomatopeia is a subclass of the concept of ideophone. Onomatopeia is designed to imitate the sound of something (mechanical, animal, or natural) .But ideophones are words used by speakers to evoke an impression, not necessarily limited to mimicry.

In English bling-bling, badonkadonk, hippetyhop, and 'jib jab' would be ideaphones. They don't necessarily imitate a sound, but they give a strong impression.
Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 10:26:05 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Onomatopeia is a subclass of the concept of ideophone.



Sorry. I do know what onomatopeia is.

I meant I don't think "plis-plas" is onomatopeia of anything,a nd I've never come across the term before.

BTW "yum yum" in Mexico is "yom yom." There was an ice cream chain with that trademark (long, long gone).
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