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Nareed
Nareed
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April 12th, 2012 at 6:38:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

  • The communist liberators knocked down the capitalist oppressors in the war.


  • Ok, political considerations aside, I think the term "knocked down" is wrong in this context. In any case, in Spanish the verb you'd want would be "derrocar," which means "to overthrow"

    Quote:

  • When she dumped me she knocked down all my self confidence.


  • This one is still problematic. In Spanish I would say "Cuando me dejó me quitó toda mi confianza en mi mismo" but even that is a poor translation.
    Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
    pacomartin
    pacomartin
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    April 12th, 2012 at 6:43:15 AM permalink
    Quote: Wizard

    Fecha: 12 de Abril, 2012
    Palabra: Rentabilizar


    Today's SWD means to cash in on, or make more profitable.

    A question for the advanced readers is how does rentabilizar differ from aprovechar. I think that aprovechar is more common and probably a safer choice for most situations. Based on very little information, its seems rentabilizar might be better for taking advantage of somebody else's situation. My degree of confidence on that is very low.

    Ejemplo time.

    Doné mucho dinero a su campaña, así despues El ganó la elección intenté rentabilizar el favor. = I donated a lot of money to his campaign, so after he wins I intend to cash in on the favor.



    rentable is an adjective with the same definition in English or Spanish (different pronunciations) - "that is fit be rented"

    renta in Spanish is a little broader than the English definition. English is pretty much combined to leasing property, including real estate, cars or tools. In Spanish it could mean the same as English, but it also could mean "aumento de la riqueza de una persona", or the increasing riches of a person.

    rentabilizar is a Spanish transitive verb which has the base meaning of making something more rentable. But it is referring to the broader definition of "rent".

    While "rentabilizer" is only a transitive verb, "approvechar" could be transitive, intranstive or reflexive.
    As a transitive verb it includes the meaning of "rentabilizer" plus the idea of proteger & favorecer; "to protect" and "to promote".
    As an intransitive verb a definition is "Adelantar en virtud, estudios, artes, etc." or to increase in virtue, studies, arts, etc.
    As a reflexive verb it means to "exploit your position"
    pacomartin
    pacomartin
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    April 12th, 2012 at 7:09:36 AM permalink
    Quote: Nareed

    Quote: Wizard

    When she dumped me she knocked down all my self confidence.



    This one is still problematic. In Spanish I would say "Cuando me dejó me quitó toda mi confianza en mi mismo" but even that is a poor translation.



    I would say that it is a somewhat unusual phrase in English as well. I think one of these sentences is more likely.

    "When she dumped me she took away all my self confidence."
    "When she dumped me she took my self confidence."
    "When she dumped me she stole my self confidence."
    "When she dumped me I lost my self confidence."
    "When she dumped me, my self esteem was knocked down."
    Wizard
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    Wizard
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    April 12th, 2012 at 7:23:13 AM permalink
    Quote: Nareed

    in Spanish the verb you'd want would be "derrocar," which means "to overthrow"



    I thought echar abajo meant to overthrow. It is on one of my flash cards. I happen to remember because it was in my rotation yesterday at the gimnasio.

    Quote: pacomartin

    renta in Spanish is a little broader than the English definition. English is pretty much combined to leasing property, including real estate, cars or tools. In Spanish it could mean the same as English, but it also could mean "aumento de la riqueza de una persona", or the increasing riches of a person.



    I thought the word for rent in Spanish was alquilar. Not to be confused with prestar, which means to borrow (without having to pay).
    It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
    pacomartin
    pacomartin
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    April 12th, 2012 at 7:44:27 AM permalink
    Quote: Wizard

    I thought the word for rent in Spanish was alquilar. Not to be confused with prestar, which means to borrow (without having to pay)



    Quote: DRAE

    rentar.
    1. tr. Dicho de una cosa: Producir o rendir beneficio o utilidad anualmente.

    alquilar. (De alquilé).
    1. tr. Dar a alguien algo, especialmente una finca urbana, un animal o un mueble, para que use de ello por el tiempo que se determine y mediante el pago de la cantidad convenida.
    2. tr. Tomar de alguien algo para este fin y con tal condición.
    3. prnl. Dicho de una persona: Ponerse a servir a otra por cierto estipendio.







    I am not sure that I understand the subtle differences.
    Nareed
    Nareed
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    April 12th, 2012 at 8:44:20 AM permalink
    Quote: Wizard

    I thought echar abajo meant to overthrow. It is on one of my flash cards. I happen to remember because it was in my rotation yesterday at the gimnasio.



    You can use both, but "derrocar" is the more common.

    Quote:

    I thought the word for rent in Spanish was alquilar. Not to be confused with prestar, which means to borrow (without having to pay).



    Rent as a noun, "renta," means the money paid monthly for rent with or without a lease, but it also mens income. no one uses "renta" to mean income frequently, except the tax collection agency, which calls the income tax "impuesto sobre la renta."

    As a verb, "rentar," means to rent or to lease. "Alquilar" means the same thing.

    "Prestar" means both to lend and to borrow. It does imply the thing or money borrowed will be given or paid back. A bank loan is also called "prestamo" and you'd better pay it back ;)
    Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
    Wizard
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    Wizard
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    April 12th, 2012 at 11:45:03 PM permalink
    Fecha: 13 de Abril, 2012
    Palabra: Largar


    Today's SWD is a tough one. Much like echar, there seem to be a whole host of usages. They mostly seem to be negative in nature. Such as a forceful leave (as in "get out of here"), be beat up, to hand over, to release (something bad). In the context I found the word it was a translation of "go away."

    I should probably leave the advanced readers to explain it better.

    Ejemplo time.

    Ella siempre me largó su trabjo sucio, y yo siempre lo hico, porque ella esta bonita. = She always gives me her dirty work, and I always do it because she is pretty.
    It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
    pacomartin
    pacomartin
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    April 13th, 2012 at 12:19:56 AM permalink
    Quote: Wizard

    Fecha: 13 de Abril, 2012 Palabra: Largar



    There isn't a verb in English with the exact same meaning. Probably the closest would be to set something "at large" where "at large" is the English idiom that is used rarely.

    • At noon, the day after the robbery, the thieves were still at large.
    • Truck drivers at large don't like the new speed restriction on the highway.
    • He ran for representative at large.
      I have only ever heard the third use when discussing the United States House of Representatives, and the 7 states with a single "at large" congressional district.

      In Spanish you can use the verb "largar" reflexively, where it literally means "I set myself at large", but you might be translating "I beat it out of here".

      The colloquial use is to "let go a slap".

      --------------------
      You misspelled "trabajo" in your translation, and the word "hico" is a cord in a hammock. Present indicative of "hacer" is "hago", and past preterite is "hice".


      --------------------
      BTW: In English "large" is a Latin word, and "long" is an Anglo Saxon word. In Spanish the adjective "largo" primarily is the same as English "large" , but it also includes some of the meanings of the English word "length"
    pacomartin
    pacomartin
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    April 13th, 2012 at 1:32:30 AM permalink

    Sofia Vergara did a funny routine about this animal (which she can't remember it's English name). What is the name in Spanish?
    Wizard
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    Wizard
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    April 13th, 2012 at 6:15:47 AM permalink
    Quote: pacomartin


    Sofia Vergara did a funny routine about this animal (which she can't remember it's English name). What is the name in Spanish?



    That looks like an English red squirrel. According to the dictionary the word for squirrel is ardilla, which also the word for other large rodents like chipmunks and gophers.

    I saw something on TV about how American grey squirrels somehow made it to the UK, and are crowding out the reds.
    It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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