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Wizard
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Wizard
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April 11th, 2012 at 6:46:04 AM permalink
Fecha: 11 de April, 2012
Palabra: Derribar


Today's SWD means to knock down, pull down, bring down, etc..

It should not be confused with demoler, which means to demolish. However, I have a harder time distinguishing derribar from atropellar. I think derribar is more for intentional actions, and atropellar unintentional. For example, I think if you were trying to knock down bottles with baseballs in a carnival game you would use derribar, which if you hit a pedestrian accidentally with your car you would use atropellar. Hopefully the advanced readers can provide better clarification.

Ejemplo time.

Traté de la impresionar con un castillo de arena, pero a ella se impresionó sólamente con el matón que lo derribó. = I tried to impress her by building a sand castle, but she was only impressed with the bully who knocked it down.
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Nareed
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April 11th, 2012 at 7:06:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It should not be confused with demoler, which means to demolish. However, I have a harder time distinguishing derribar from atropellar.



I understand "atropellar" as "to run over someone or something," as running over someone with a car. The word is almost used exclusively in the sense of a pedestrian being hit or run over by a car, whether on purpose or not (of course, most such incidents are accidents).

However, one definition in the dictionary is "Derribar o empujar violentamente a alguien para abrirse paso." So... :)

The related word "atropello" means being run over or stomped on metaphorically. For example, if a government official capriciously clsoes down your business, you'd say in outrage "¡Esto es un atropello!"

Quote:

Traté de la impresionar con un castillo de arena, pero a ella se impresionó sólamente con el matón que lo derribó. = I tried to impress her by building a sand castle, but she was only impressed with the bully who knocked it down.



"Traté de impresionarLA con un castillo de arena, pero ella se impresionó solamente..."
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pacomartin
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April 11th, 2012 at 7:17:18 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, I have a harder time distinguishing derribar from atropellar. I think derribar is more for intentional actions, and atropellar unintentional.



atropellar has as it's root word tropa or "troops", and implies a group of troops taking over a city. The verbs are complex with multiple definitions, but atropellar implies you were run over by a car, invaded by droves of something like an animal, a moving crowd, or in a figurative sense by a political movement.

There is a sense of unintentional in the word atropellar , because you are doing something hastily and without due consideration (like an invading army). But it is not "unintentional" necessarily in the sense of "innocent". It's like invading troops that accidentally blow up the church.
Wizard
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Wizard
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April 11th, 2012 at 4:19:15 PM permalink
Thanks. Good responses. Which word would you use for these situations? I'm not asking for a translation of the whole sentence, just the appropriate "knock down" word.

  1. The wind was so strong it knocked me over.
  2. The communist liberators knocked down the capitalist oppressors in the war.
  3. If you knock down the stack of bottles with the baseball you win a teddy bear.
  4. When she dumped me she knocked down all my self confidence.
  5. Knock down this domino and they all will fall.
  6. The police had to knock down the door to get in.
  7. The earthquake knocked down all the cans from the shelves.
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Nareed
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April 11th, 2012 at 4:38:31 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Which word would you use for these situations? I'm not asking for a translation of the whole sentence, just the appropriate "knock down" word.



1. me derribó
2. let me get back to you on that
3. si derribas
4. later
5. derriba
6. derribar
7. tiró todas las latas.

I hope it's clear.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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April 11th, 2012 at 7:29:02 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

7. tiró todas las latas.

I hope it's clear.



Not quite. I was going to say that I thought tirar meant to throw, but I see it also can mean knock down, to add to the confusion. Here are two examples at reverso:

¡abre, o tiro la puerta abajo! = open up, or I'll break the door down!
el viento ha tirado la valla = the wind has knocked the fence down

That said, why didn't you use tirar for #1 and #6 below:

1. The wind was so strong it knocked me over.
6. The police had to knock down the door to get in.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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April 11th, 2012 at 7:40:22 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That said, why didn't you use tirar for #1 and #6 below:

1. The wind was so strong it knocked me over.
6. The police had to knock down the door to get in.



Poetic license :P

Seriously, it's usage, mostly. You can appropriately use "tirar" in both the above examples, but my first impulse is "derribar."
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pacomartin
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April 11th, 2012 at 9:00:08 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Seriously, it's usage, mostly. You can appropriately use "tirar" in both the above examples, but my first impulse is "derribar."



Difficult thing about language is that people often make thousands of these arbitrary choices. But without them you always sound foreign.

I was wondering if the following word is used frequently in newspapers in Mexico city:
hegemonía (Del gr. ἡγεμονία, dirección, jefatura).Supremacía que un Estado ejerce sobre otros.
Wizard
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Wizard
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April 12th, 2012 at 6:15:01 AM permalink
Fecha: 12 de Abril, 2012
Palabra: Rentabilizar


Today's SWD means to cash in on, or make more profitable.

A question for the advanced readers is how does rentabilizar differ from aprovechar. I think that aprovechar is more common and probably a safer choice for most situations. Based on very little information, its seems rentabilizar might be better for taking advantage of somebody else's situation. My degree of confidence on that is very low.

Ejemplo time.

Doné mucho dinero a su campaña, así despues El ganó la elección intenté rentabilizar el favor. = I donated a lot of money to his campaign, so after he wins I intend to cash in on the favor.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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April 12th, 2012 at 6:34:53 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how does rentabilizar differ from aprovechar.



I don't see a relation between the two words. "Aprovechar" means "to make us of" or "to take advantage of." It's the opposite of "desperdiciar" = "to waste."

The word you chose is not very common. It's the kind of word most people do know, but woulndn't be able to use in a sentence. I can't quite figure it out myself. I'd say you encounter it, if at all, int he financial section of the newspaper and nowhere else.

Quote:

Doné mucho dinero a su campaña, así despues El ganó la elección intenté rentabilizar el favor. = I donated a lot of money to his campaign, so after he wins I intend to cash in on the favor.



Ok, I just can't figure out if your sue of the word is right or not. I'd ditch it and use somethign else, something clearer. So:

"Doné mucho dinero a su campaña. Así que cuando el ganE la elección, pienso pasarle la factura."

This maans what you said in English, except "factura" means "bill" in this context. So the second sentence means "So after he wins the election I intend to pass him the bill."

Back to Spanish, you coudl have said "...pienso cobrarle," meaning "I intend to collect."
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